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□ EDO? 1501715 H 

California State Library 



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PANORAMIC SERIES, PLATE 68. 



WITH S. F. NEWS LETTER, JULY 3, 1897, 




PICTURESQUE CALIFORNIA. na* Photo, s. r. 

fOSEMITE VALLEY-Viev/ from Franklin Rock, Showing Vernal Falls ; height 336 feet. 



I 12284 



Price per Copy. 10 I 



Annual Subscription, 




8 *N rRANClSe* 




i&txlii omxtnibtotxtx sjer. 




KoJ.IK. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 3, 1897. 



Number 1. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by the proprietor, FRED MARR10T1 
5H Kearny street, San FrancUco. Knttrtd at San FraneUco Post- 
ojlee at Second-elate Matter. 

The ofice of the AEWS LETTER in New York City is at Temple Court; 
and at Chicago, 903 Boyce Building, (Frank E Morrison, Eastern 
Representative), where information may be obtained regarding subscrip- 
tion and advertising rates. 

FIGEL is behind the bars charged with the murder of 
Isaac Hoffman. He voluntarily gave himself up — 
presumably to save the super-sensitive feelings of the 
Chief of Police, who otherwise would have been called 
upon to arrest him. 



THE Mayor's veto of the ordinance prohibiting the use 
of aspbahum in certain districts, in its turn has been 
vetoed by the Supervisors. The position of the Mayor was 
and is the just one, and can be maintained upon all reason- 
able ground. Insurance companies, the fire department, his 
Honor the Mayor, and common sense are opposed to the 
action of the Supervisors — who, however, may be able to 
satisfy themselves for causes not within the public view. 



GOLDEN Gate Park, always well cared for, beauti- 
ful, and the pride of our city, is being made especially 
attractive in honor of the Christian Endeavorers, who will 
soon be here. Superintendent McLaren and his fellow 
commissioners deserve especial credit for the perfect order 
and increasing charm of this delightful spot. Our Eastern 
friends will find the most pleasant of memory's pictures 
that they will carry away with them taken from the Park, 
which the generosity of the people and the labors of the 
Commissioners have made an enduring and fragrant fact. 



BRADBURY, the young millionaire, has had a wor«e 
fate befall him than to be imprisoned for spitting in a 
street car. The two years of his connubial bliss has come 
to a sudden end, and the handsome wife of his bosom has 
eloped with an Englishman. She is now seeking a divorce 
on the ground that the Britisher could play the better 
game of polo. Being a woman she will get what she 
wants. There is no denying a woman in California when 
she desires another fellow. It is a case of the survival — if 
not of the fittest — at least of the newest— in such cases. 



THE city is gaily decorating for the ceremonies and 
splendid memories of Independence Day and the com- 
ing of the Endeavorers. The Fourth — which in San Fran- 
cisco comes this year on the fifth — will be celebrated with 
the usual parades, oratory, fire-crackers, confusion and 
evening illuminations, all of which will be escaped by those 
who can get away, and endured with fortitude by others 
less fortunate. Hail to the Glorious Fourth; and hail to 
all the sacred traditions and blessings for which it stands. 
May its fire-crackers never grow less, nor its patriotic 
shadow diminish. 

THE scandal in the Internal Revenue office in this city has 
taken a new turn within the past few days. Follow- 
ing the defalcation and death of Cashier Norton, it tran- 
spires that Collector Welburn was himself going the pace 
that kills, and as a result he is to-day a fugitive from jus- 
tice. Now that the spell has been broken, the wild ex- 
cesses of the Collector, which should have been long ago 
known by his superiors, are shown to have been public 
property. One of the darkest stains upon^the_character 
of this man lies in the fact that he endeayor^p^ES^slear 
himself from suspicion by charging his own dis¥«\)iUj;8tr ,J " 

acts to the account of the dead cashier. " • 

fE... 



" /CALIFORNIA; the Land of Promise," has just been 
W published by the State Board of Trade, and is a 
most interesting and valuable book of 128 pages. It was 
published in part for the Christian Endeavorers, who will 
visit the city next week. The book is filled with articles 
touching all the principal industries of the State, written 
and signed by men prominent in the various lines treated. 
It answers questions that would naturally be asked by 
those unacquainted with the material resources of the 
State. The introduction is the finished work of Mr. Wil- 
liam H. Mills, and to that gentleman is very largely due 
the idea and admirable character of the book, which is 
really a valuable contribution to the immigration litera- 
ture of the State. 



THE Manufacturers' and Producers' Association has 
done much for the suppression of impure and adulter- 
ated foods; and its officers have the confidence of the 
public in the fight that has been made. That there 
is dissatisfaction in certain quarters because the Associa- 
tion is to be prominently identified with the Mechanics' 
Institute Exposition, was to have been expected. Adul- 
terated goods have obtained in California to an alarming 
extent, and anything that tends to single them out and 
prevent their sale will be resisted by those who have 
profited by their sale. The Association and Mechanics' 
Institute should not be diverted from their commendable 
object by threats or promises. The people pay for pure 
food, and they are entitled to it. Let the adulterators 
kick. Their own shins will be barked. 



THE Dairymen's Union, which does a produce and com- 
mission business at 113 to 119 Davis street, has been 
fined $75 for selling adulterated currant jelly. Professor 
Wenzell upon its analysis, declared that the "jelly" was 
impure, and the fine followed with refreshing promptness 
upon his report. The manager of the Union has filed an 
appeal to the Superior Court ' and hopes to reverse Judge 
Campbell upon the ground that Wenzell is not an expert. 
Much of the stuff that was sold here as currant jelly needed 
no expert testimony to establish the fact that it was im- 
pure; but it would require several specialists to determine 
the exact formula of its manufacture. The Dairymen's 
Union evidently has no appreciation of the true value of 
advertising; for the evidence on which convictions are ob- 
tained, shows that the stuff sold was the worst sort of a 
fraud. By the time Manager Dutton gets all these facts 
before the people of San Francisco the currant season will 
be over and his jelly trade will be knocked into the year 1900. 



SUDITOR Broderick has revised the estimates of ex- 
penses for the next municipal year. It is agreeable 
to note that there is some one on the salary roll at the 
City Hall who is willing to admit the existence of the tax- 
payers. Broderick has cut wisely, with the possible ex- 
ception of the Health Department. His estimate of $10,- 
000 is clearly insufficient to carry on the work undertaken 
by the Board, and which is necessary to the efficiency of 
that department and the safety of the public. His biggest 
cut is in the school department. Three quarters of a mil- 
lion is a great sum, but the Auditor says that the schools 
can get along with that much less than the estimate. 
When the frills and scallops are trimmed off that depart- 
ment, and our children are educated for the practical 
struggles of life, rather than forced to waste their time in 
getting a smattering of drawing, music, pastry, embroid- 
ery, painting, and all the rest of it, the value of the public 
schools will be greatly enlarged and their cost materially 
lessened. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 3, 1897. 



WHAT DO WE WANT WITH HAWAII? 

ALL the really great newspapers of the country are 
making a strenuous opposition to the annexation of 
Hawaii. Tbey see in it a new and evil departure from 
the advice of the early fathers, and from the traditional 
of our nation. They fail to recognize one sound ar- 
gument in its favor, or a single advantage to be gained by 
its accomplishment. Taking this high ground, they are 
dealing with the subject with something more than ordi- 
nary earnestness and ability. If the politicians of the 
period are amenable to reasons presented in downright 
earnestness, and in language that permits of no doubt of 
the sincerity and fulness of knowledge of the writers, the 
annexation of these outlying islands is doomed to defeat. 
On all sides the question is being asked: What do we want 
with Hawaii, anyhow? Can anybody tell? Is it to obtain 
cheap sugar that we desire them? The cheapening of the 
workingmun's breakfast would be an object worth striving 
after, but it is not our people who profit by the rebated 
sugar duties. The planters have always managed to exact 
Eastern prices, and to add thereto the railroad charges 
that Eastern sugar would have to pay. In the matter of 
cheapness we gain absolutely nothing by free trade in 
sugar with the Islands, but, on the contrary, we pay on 
an average about $4,000,000 a year for the poor privilege 
of trading with Hawaii at all. She takes goods from us 
to about that amount, and no more. We make her a 
present of all she needs virtually, and the quid pro quo we 
receive in return is the beggarly right to buy her sugar 
at the highest prices known in this market. Monstrous 
as this view of the subject is. there is a still worse phase 
to it. We are living under an administration and Congress 
pledged above all other things to extend protection to all 
home industries. We have a new and struggling industry 
in California, over the brilliant prospects of which we have 
all been congratulating ourselves for some time past. To 
the growing of sugar beets in this climate and soil there 
is no end. The business of growing and manufacturing 
these has assumed considerable proportions within the 
past two or three years. It is asserted by experts that 
California could in time produce all the sugar consumed in 
the United States. Why should this most promising in- 
dustry be the only one in all the country subjected to free 
trade? They are traitors to their country, and especially 
to California, who would wipe out a grand interest capable 
of indefinite expansion, for no other reason than to please 
a few hungry planters, and to help the sugar trust of New 
York to kill beet growing in the far West. Mr. Oxnard. 
of Chino, has just declared in an interview that "if either 
reciprocity is renewed or the Islands annexed, his Factory 
must close, and the beet sugar industry die. If he must 
grow sugar he would have to go to the Islands to do it. " 
What are the Islanders to us that we should make such 
enormous sacrifices in their behalf? Nine-tenths of them 
are coolie contract laborers, the poorest paid and most 
degraded on earth. Is it for them that such harsh meas- 
ures are to be taken towards our own farmers who are 
making a success of growing beets? Is this Melvnleyism, 
or what? lioth Sherman and McKinley stand pledged in 
the strongest terms to resist annexation. Yet suddenly, 
without public discussion, or apparent cause, they have 
lent their sanction to the very thing they vowed they 
would never favor. What does* it all mean? The safest 
guides in the Eastern press say that it is a trick; a de- 
vice intended to cover an ulterior purpose. It is a matter 
of public notoriety that for years past no love has been 
lost between the Spreckels family of this Coast and the 
great Sugar Trust of New York. The Trust isobviously in- 
terested in destroying the competition of the beet 
growers, and in wiping out the Spreckels' large interest 
therein. The Trust carries all it wants through Congress, 
and this blow at California is not the least of its sue 
there. It is said that without this concession to the Trust 
the tariff could not pass. This accounts for the milk in 
the cocoanut. It is not because we want a coaling station 
where we have one already, nor because we want an out- 
lying post, which in time of war would be more of a trouble 
to ourselves than to our enem we have an 

overgrown and corrupt trust, thai for personal ends, and 
without regard to the interests of this section of the coun- 
try, desires annexation, and is powerful enough to stop 



the tariff, currency reform, and all the rest of the pro- 
gramme, until its demands are satisfied. That is the con- 
dition that confronts the Nation. We are to set aside all 
precedents, enter upon a new departure in regard to 
foreign relations, acquire dominion not our own, but which 
we helped to steal from an innocent, docile, and friendly 
people — all this at the behests of a corrupt, aud unlawful 
combination or corporation. The N. Y. Journal and the 
San Francisco Kxaminer pretend that annexation is the one 
thing with which to kill the trust. Pshaw' Who but fools 
can be deceived thereby? This "killing" scheme is mak- 
ing its way through a Congress that the Trust owns, and 
the Trust's friends are its friends. Better evidence than 
that, no man Deedeth. 

The Coming The gathering of next week in this city 

Endeavo-ers. will not only be an important occasion in 
the history of the city, but it will as well 
be an important convocation of the world in a religious 
sense. The Christian Endeavorers, twenty thousand 
strong, are now rolling toward the Golden Gate from 
North, East and South. They come from every State and 
territory, and represent every shade of Protestant faith. 
They are worthy, active Christians, and the marvelous 
growth of their organization is the strongest possible evi- 
dence of the broad basis upon which they stand, and an 
unanswerable argument for the simple and practical 
character of their piety. The Endeavorers are represen- 
tative of deeds rather than creeds; and in this they are 
following closely the teachings and life of Him who spake 
as never man spake. To these earnest Christian workers 
San Francisco opens wide her gates, and bids them wel- 
come with a hospitality worthy of the Golden State, of 
themselves, and the pure and elevating principles for 
which they stand. In all the wide stretch of their travels 
they will see no richer fields, more beautiful landscapes, or 
prosperous homes than in this State of gold and grain, 
fruit and of wine. California covets the closest examina- 
tion, and challenges the inevitable contrast between its 
natural claims and accomplished results — its opp'Ttunities 
and solid advantages, and the possibilities of other States. 

The visit of these active men and women from the East 
will be of great value to our State and city. They will 
take home with them a practical knowledge of the climate, 
resources, and products of Califoruia, and many of them 
will return. Their endorsement will carry weight, and the 
information disseminated by them will bear fruit for many 
years. Their expenditures here will aggregate a very 
large sum of money, which will find its way into all the 
channels of commerce and directly benefit all classes of 
trade. 

The gathering of the Kndeavorers here may be credited 
very largely to the persistent and intelligent efforts of 
Mr. Rolla v. Watt. At its inception the undertaking was 
regarded as almost hopeless. The great distance from 
the center of Eastern population, time consumed in the 
journey, and the cost of the trip, added to the rivalry of 
other points, would have discouraged a less able commander 
and defeated a less carefully-matured and well-conducted 
campaign. The proper entertainment of these strangers 
within our gates is being provided for by the generous 
people of San Francisco, who undertake nothing that they 
do not accomplish in a creditable manner. They extend 
a sincere welcome to the coming guests, and will speed 
them homeward with naught but pleasant memories of 
their voyage to this peerless State. 

Some Curiosities The great case, taken altogether, of 
of the the people against Figel, charged with 

Flgel Case. embezzlement, forgery, ami murder, is 

brimful of curiosities that discrimin- 
ating men will find much interest in watching from this time 
on. In the lirst and foremost place, there is the attitude 
of the venerable old gentleman who presides over the 
Police Department. The friend of Figel, his theory of the 
taking off of Isaac Hotlman was by the suicide route. He 
is not known to have changed that opinion, although all 
the known facts are against it. When the jury found that 
it was murder at the hands of somebody unknown, the old 
gentleman blurted out that that was what he had said 
from the beginning, which, of course, was a lapse of mem- 



July 3. 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



ory, tolerable in one who has long passed the ace of retire- 
ment from active usefulness. Then warrants are sworn 
out against the offender, not by the people through their 
regular officers, but by private citiiens who would gladly 

have avoided the unpleasant duty. Crimes that have 

startled the whole community and ory aloud to be avenged 

are,not thought subjects for the proper prosecuting offi- 

10 deal with, but private counsel are made to take 

the plaeejof the District Attorney and his Strong array 
of Lieutenants. The counsel on both sides are curiosities 
in themselves. D. .1. .Murphy is for the prosecution, and 
Lloyd and Louderback for the defense. For more years 
than we can recall, those three attorneys and the police 
department have been asone. Why this apparent division 
now '.' He would be a wise man who could tell the reason 
why. Certain, however, it is that there is more in it than 
meets the eye. Now comes the announcement that .lud^ie 
Murphy, the ostensible public prosecutor, has selected 
Detective Hogan to assist him in representing the people 
and the majesty of the law. The Chief has joined to his 
own services, apparently devoted to the other side, those 
of bis old chum, Captain Boban. Why this division of the 
city's detective force in the face of the law's common 
enemy ? As there had to be such a division, we think the 
prosecution has the best of it. Hogan possesses superior 
ability, but that fact excited the enmity of those above 
him, and, in consequence, he has for years been relegated 
to a position as bailiff in the Grand Jury room, where he 
could neither be seen nor heard. Judge Murphy knows 
this, and has done the very best available thing to coun- 
teract Figel's aiders and abetters. It is a marvelous case 
as it stands, and, if the daily press were as alert as in the 
matter of poor Currant, the developments would surpass 
the record. 



As to the English 

Stockholders of 

The Central Pacific. 



It is, of course, always to be re- 
gretted when foreign investors in 
American enterprises, especially 
iD those of a semi-public nature, do 
not come by their own. Every case of default or loss 
cripples our credit, and does us incalculable harm. It is 
but fair to say that on this side of the water jealous re- 
gard is had for our credit, and greater regret is invariably 
felt when our creditors abroad are likely to be out and in- 
jured, than when the same thing is threatened to our own 
people at home. That is how it comes that our credit 
abroad stands so high. The way in which we have re- 
duced our national debt has surprised all Europe. But 
with changed and changing times, and diversions of trade 
and traffic from one route to another, our railroads have 
not all met their obligations as fully and as promptly 
as could be wished. Some of them present as good 
securities as are to be found in the world, whilst 
some others are not so good. But with the present rate 
of development of the country, all in due time may be 
relied upon to yield fair returns. There will be no loss 
ultimately to anybody. But, meanwhile, there are cases 
in which it will be wise to bear and forbear. It quite often 
pays to ride a waiting race in order to win in the end. 
We have the case of the Central Pacific railroad of Cali- 
fornia in mind. It forms part of our first great trans- 
continental road. It was aided in part by the Govern- 
ment in the shape of guaranteed bonds, which will begin 
to fall due at the end of the year. Proposals have been 
before the last two Congresses, looking to the renewal of 
these bonds for a lengthened period, but though stubborn 
contests were waged in favor of a refunding measure, it 
lacked a few votes of adoption. It is admittedly hard to 
expect a road, out of its net earnings, to pay off its cap- 
ital cost within the first quarter of a century of its exist- 
ence. There are probably no roads in the world, and cer- 
tainly none in the United States, that could carry such an 
undertaking. Moreover, the Central Pacific has equitable 
claims for at least leniency at the hands of the Govern- 
ment. In the first place, it was undertaken as a neces- 
sary war measure, was pushed through regardless of cost, 
and at a time when both labor and material were ab- 
normally high. It has more than subserved the purposes 
expected of it. It has opened the entire width of the con- 
tinent to settlement, brought the whole nation together, 
as it were, and coutinues to be one of the great enter- 
prises of the world, and certainly one in which Americans 



enough pride to sec that it finally pays all it owes, 
That will certainly be done sooner or later. Everybody 
hereabouts admits that, and hence the folly of at present 
pushing matters to extremes. < >f the five great men who 
built the road and operated it, only one survives, bul he is 
a tower of strength in himself. In his trained hands the 

road is safer and better in every way than in those of a 
receiver, No man alive today could probably occupy Mr. 
Huntington's shoes or bring this railroad problem to an 
end with more satisfactory results to all concerned. We 
ara aware that an objection is made to his action in build- 
ing the Southern Pacific road, as an apparent competitor 
to the Central. But the facts have to be taken into con- 
sideration. There was simply nothing else left for him to 
do. The late Thomas A, Scott, one of the most noted 
railroad kings iu the country, with all the power of the 
great Pennsylvania road at his back, was alreadj before 
Congress with a scheme to build the Southern Pacific 
road. In his hands it was certaio of adoption. The Cen- 
tral Pacific could not afford to see such a rival come into 
the field. What was it to do? What it did do was to send 
Mr. Huntington to Washington, who quickly pushed Scott 
from his coigne of vantage, and carried off the prize. In- 
stead of a ruinous competition ensuing, a friendly road was 
built that depends largely upon way-side traffic, and inter- 
feres but little with the business that of right belongs to 
the Ceutral Pacific. No fair-minded man will dispute the 
fact that nothing better could have been done in the then 
existing situation. The general consensus of opinion is 
that Congress will yet come to the relief of this road, and 
that thereafter it will be in a position to discharge all its 
obligations, and pay fair dividends to its stockholders. If 
these gentlemen prefer to put the road into the hands of 
a receiver, they can doubtless do it, but they had better 
take pause and learn what they would gain thereby. 



Does The Grand Every one, of course, knows the story 
Jury of the desperate highwayman who was 

Mean Business? on trial before a Texan judge. He 
stormed like one mad at the crowd in 
the Court room, but when the Judge slowly arose, drew a 
weapon, and ordered the criminal to take his seat, the 
latter obeyed. When asked why he feared the Judge and 
not the crowd, he replied that "he had looked all of them 
squarely in the eyes, and had seen that the old man was 
the only one who meant shoot." The existing Grand In- 
quest of this city and county has taken in hand two deli- 
cate and most serious questions in regard to which all 
good citizens would like to know if they are in dead earnest. 
Their weapons are, or can be, well charged — do they mean 
to fire? We hope, rather than expect that they will. 
We think a majority of them honest men, and are disposed 
to give them credit for good intentions until the contrary 
appears.. They have moved in the direction of certain 
growing and awful evils in Chinatown, and against the ex 
ceedingly numerous gambling devices that are being open- 
ly played in this city. The Grand Jury that cannot bring 
both of these evils within a measurable degree of subjec- 
tion are impotent for good. And that is just what they 
will prove to be, unless they dispense with the so-called 
services of the Police Department, and give cheerful aid 
and comfort to experts from without. Their readiness, or 
failure to do that means the parting of the ways to evil 
or to good, and may be taken to be the test of the jury's 
virility. It is true as the police well know, and as some 
of them have confessed, that hundreds of white girls of 
our own race have been lured to Chinatown, made opium 
fiends, and then debauched to the everlasting ruin of both 
their bodies and souls. If this be true and susceptible of 
proof, as it is, grand jui'ymen ought not to be able to sleep 
in their beds at night, whilst failing to use the power en- 
trusted to them by the people for the suppression of evils 
so vile that they do not bear telliDg off, and that are at 
this moment crying aloud to both God and man for relief. 
The gambling attractions make a sad showing in both the 
Figel and Norton cases, and the jury needs go no further 
for information to determine what to do. A word to the 
wise is enough. We will watch the movements of the jury 
with interest, ready, at all times, to render it assistance 
in well doing. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 3, 1897. 



A Better Way Within the next year San Francisco 
Than is going to have much worry, spend a 

Charter Making. good deal of money and in the end fail 
of its object, i. e. the passage of a 
satisfactory charter. There is no use in blinking the fact. 
Those who favor purer, more economical, and better 
government have not votes enough to carry a charter cal- 
( ulated to give this greatly misgoverned city those benefi- 
cent results. We have tried it five times without success. 
The instrument defeated last November could hardly be 
improved upon, it had the vigorous advocacy of the entire 
press, and the support of about all of our ratepayingcitizens, 
yet the politicians gave it its quietus as easily and as 
effectually as they could dispose of a drink of whiskey. 
On the other hand, the forces in its favor were well organ- 
ized, and no effort was spared to poll a majority vote. 
Yet they failed, as they had done on four previous occa- 
sions. No charter can pass that ought to pass. The ex- 
isting consolidated act is what the Bosses, operating 
through the legislature, have made it. They know it in all 
its parts, and how to make it do the most good to them. 
They have from time to time amended it to suit their own 
corrupt purposes, and, very naturally, are unwilling to 
part with it. Nothing has occurred to change that condi- 
tion of affairs. Another proposed charter would be beaten 
by a much larger majority than the last was. That is the 
condition which undoubtedly confronts us. How are we to 
remedy it? Keep San Francisco's boundaries as they are 
and it cannot be remedied. Take in new voters, made up 
mainly of the taxpaying class, and the difficulty would 
vanish. That is the only way in sight for bringing this 
city into line with the municipal reforms of the age. We 
want, in short, A Gkkatkk San FBANCI81 0. 

Results From It is clear that the internal revenue de- 
The partment of the United States, located 

Spoils System, in this city, has been going altogether 
to the bad for some time past. When 
Senator White recommended Welburn for collector, he no 
doubt believed that his nominee would not disgrace himself 
or his backer. Yet there could have been precious little 
evidence before him that Welburn would make a really cap- 
able officer, or that he would surround himself with good 
official company. Considerations of that kind never, 
probably, entered into the reckoning. It was a political 
appointment, pure and simple. Senator White had the 
chief office placed at his disposition and he paid a political 
debt with it. The deputyships were allotted to other 
politicians, and Welburn was but a mere figure head, with- 
out power to enforce discipline within his own office. 
Deputies with more of a pull than he, did just about as they 
liked, and he could not so much as command an accounting 
from them of the money in their hands. We now know 
something of the ugly inside facts. His chief deputy, 
Norton, is a defaulter in at least the sum of slo 000 and is 
a suicide. The life he was living was in part known to the 
collector, and yet his accounts do not appear to have been 
effectually checked up. Welburn himself passed more of 
his time on the outside than on the inside. All hands ap- 
peared to depend more upon their political "pulls" than 
upon the efficiency of their services. As a consequence, 
the internal revenue office of Uncle Sam has been out- 
rageously looted, and is now in a state of chaos. Good 
men who were induced to go upon the bonds of the rascals 
are liable to pay for the fun the latter have been having. 
It is a sorry business all round. When men are appointed 
because of acquired merit, and are retained during good 
behavior, the public offices will not be the dens of iniquity 
that some of them are, as the natural consequences of the 
spoils system. 

ON" next Saturday, the 10th inst., the contractors who 
have done the work on the City Hall dome will give a 
banquet to their friends in the rotunda of the buildin 
which there will be music, a speech by the Mayor, and 
other exercises. The dome of the hall is a beautiful piece of 
work, and its completion a proper cause for congratula- 
tion and pride. The Nbws LetteH, with its accustomed 
enterprise, will present a handsome picture of the interior 
of the dome, which will be accompanied by an interesting 
description of the work, on that lav. 

All sensible people drink Jackson'- Napa Soda. 



* C ST _> * 

?& dan Jrancisco ana ».»-. 

S. Tforth {Pacific Sftaiiivay ^. 



rjj 



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*U The Picturesque Route of California. •£• 






I ytmv I^flTES 






FOR THE 






4S OF JULY 

tj>f On Sunday and Monday, July 4th and 5th, *U 

| ONE SINGLE FARE | 

jU For the round trip to all points NORTH of «*- 

f$» SAN RAFAEL ^ 

*& <$f 

* Return limit, Tuesday, Julu 6, 1897. * 

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-V- Round Trip Tickets wilt be sold from _r» 

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Inclusive. Return Limit Tuesday, July 6th, at the following 
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8EB IS TO POL ... 2 70 
QUERNEVILLE . ■ 76 
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July 3, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



FREEDOM IS FOR THE FREE. 



Til IS is our day of days, on which we burn 
Our hearts best incense at our country's shrine; 
It is the season when we love to turn 
Time's dv> to read in every line 

On one immortal page, of deeds that shine 
In deathless glory there for us to see 

The righteous road our fathers did define, 
When the oppressor's yoke of tyranny. 
They flung aside to tread the pathway of the free. 

Now though we look with pride upon the past, 

And with fond faith its splendid story tell; 
Let not security about us cast 

Peace-born indifference, until we dwell 

Within the fancied safety of a spell, 
From which it meaneth naught but death to wake; 

That bard were base as he whose cold kiss fell 
Upon the Saviour's cheek, did he forsake 
The truth for fictioned phrase, or with false fingers take 

From out the treasured past one grain of gold, 
To gild with flattering pen a present pride; 

Nay, for the truth, let him be overbold, 
And chart the crafty currents of that tide, 
On which great nations have been known to glide 

Along seductive summer seas to where 
Corruption's black and stealthy waters hide 

The seething circles of an unseen snare, 
To drag them down to death in revolution's lair. 

O'er nations founded on a faith as great 

As that whose altar fires alive we keep, 
Time's overwhelming waters, soon or late, 

Have rolled the requiem of a lasting sleep; 

From out the surges that above them weep, 
Comes there no voice that we can understand? 

Yea, all the wailing winds that o'er them sweep, 
Tell that the fairest fabrics ever planned. 
Were by corruption's breath first to destruction fanned. 

But we are in our swaddling clothes as yet, 

What is a century when we come to scan 
The lives of nations; let us not forget 

That some a thousand years their courses ran, 

Before their glory faded in the van 
Of conquering hosts whose prowess laid them low; 

But ere they fell within themselves began 
Corruption's secret seeds to thrive and grow. 
Till sappedof strength and power they yielded to the foe. 

There is no treason in the righteous ery 
Of those who long some galling load have borne; 

An answering echo comes from out the sky, 
When multitudes with patience long outworn, 
Rise to redeem a country's faith foresworn; 

And yet corruption in our very eyes 

Flaunts the foul wreaths which her bold brows adorn, 

Until we worship when we should despise, 
And Freedom's but a name our slavery to disguise. 

Or has the soft insidious chain we wear, 

Grown so familiar, that we cease to feel 
Its binding links, or with a caitiff fear, 

Do we within our hearts our shame conceal? 

Shall cold indifference to our country's weal, 
Teach us from out the patriot path to stray? 

Till at corruption's venal shrine we kneel, 
Obedient to her honor-killing sway? 
Methinks our valiant dead point out another way. 

Better a thousand times our sleeping coasts 
Should wake to action, and some foreign foe, 

In open warfare, come with all his hosts, 
For then the saving strength of long ago 
Would leap to life, and with new courage glow. 

And purge us of this life-destroying stain; 

But now corruption's sick'ning currents flow, 

And send their poisoned floods through every vein, 
And as we lie asleep, our strength and valor drain. 

Freedom is for the free, not they alone 
Are slaves, who cringe beneath a despots frown, 

Or shrink within the shadow of a throne, 
Where some empurpled puppet wears a crown; 



Nay, they have often torn bucb tyrants down, 
E'en if again they did their crowns resti 
For in her owi . ■ • 1 1 1 Freedom drown 

Her faithless suns, and her red vials pour 
On them when in her name some monster they adore. 

Oh! if there be a liturgy of shame, 
"1'is that which Liberty doth often hear. 

When thronging to her altars, in her name, 

Come faithless Followers, who alleciance swear; 

Foul priests of Baal, who would downward tear 
And trample Freedom's temple in the mire. 

How long, O Lord! how long must freemen wear 
The livery of slaves? Send down thy fire, 
And blast these traitors dead upon corruption's pyre. 

The Truth shall make us free. O Thou Supreme, 

And never failing Guide, on whom we rest, 
Pour the clear waters of Truth's cleansing stream 

On all our thirsting land from East to West; 

Corruption with her hydra-headed crest, 
Which all too long with patience we have borne, 

Now let us fling forever from our breast, 
Ere we like Samson of our strength be shorn, 
And left a world's reproach, a thing of shame and scorn. 

Louis A. Robertson. 
San Francisco, July 3, 1897. 

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SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 3, 1897. 








We obey no wand but pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 

*HE first act of .4 Social Highwayman 
was half over when I reached the 
Columbia Tuesday night; the entire play 
was over when I left. You may be famil- 
~~" " iar with Miss Train's story, be able to pre- 
dict the scheme and climaxes of Miss Mary 
T. Stone's dramatization, and youmayhold the pickpocket 
hero to be a degenerate sensation already too highly pop- 
ularized by the Sunday newspaper, but you are in a splen- 
did state of suspense nevertheless until the last curtain is 
down. The piece is a study rather than a story; the in- 
terest is single and compact; and the inevitable end — 
obvious as it is from the very start — is reached by an un- 
deviating crescendo that swells your interest at every ex- 
pansion. And this is accomplished mostly by incident, 
pure and simple. There is little of the psychological— un- 
less it be in the character of Hanby, the valet— that is 
not furnished by the auditor. The man Courtice Jaffrey 
is a thief, as many another stage person has been, with 
the manners, taste, and many of the instincts of a gentle- 
man. He has no wide philosophy, no anarchistic excuses, 
no remorse. He steals the jewels from a woman's throat, 
and his only anxiety is what the attitude of the world would 
be if his crimes were known. He loves a good woman, loves 
her dearly, but he gives way to another man. because that 
man is his friend; or what is more probable, because he 
loves the woman, and, even though she is rich enough for 
two, he dare not risk her against the chance of being brought 
to justice. Yet he has the gamester's nerve, and early in 
the game he trifles with his own security. This is con- 
sistent. His confession is quiet and to the point: his valet 
pleads guilty to the thefts — this is not true and he will not 
have it so. This is consistent, too. You may reason it 
out as much as you please, for you are the spectator, the 
author gives the incidents and the atmosphere, but makes 

no deductions. 

# * » 

I like Jaffrey's character, for it is not needlessly 
hero' zed, and plausible evil-doers are rare tothestage; but 
I like the valet's character more, because it is wonderful, 
simple and mystical, and his dignity is superb 

Mr. Frank Worthing plays Jaffrey more surfacially than 
is vital to the part; he makes a greater exposure of the 
man's inner consciousness than there is cue for, and the 
result is a type and a temperament that are enthusias- 
tically in excess of what the character should represent. 
Moreover, I regret that Mr. Worthing is encouraging in 
himself a system of articulation and intonation that would 
be difficult to corroborate in man or dictionary. 

The sensation of the cast was Mr. Frederick Perry, of 
whom nobody in the theatre seemed to know anything be- 
yond the fact that he came from Denver, which is in Colo- 
rado. L'nless Mr. Perry, like Miss Moretti, should turn 
out to be a wonder of one part, he is a good man to ex- 
pect character from. And he seems to be of the bless- 
edly different. Hanby would not survive a single actor- 
ism: the part is uncompromising: it is keyed down to the 
deeper subtleties. Over the poignant individuality of the 
man is stretched the ambiguous mask of the servant. The 
adjustment is a matter of fine suggestion and magnetism. 
That was the way Mr. Perry played the part. 

# • * 

The tendency of the costume play is to hold the mirror 
up to the stage. It builds on the petty tricks of the 
theatre, and by comparison makes the ordinary world of 
to-day seem a remarkably vivid and dramatic place to live 
in. lam thinking particularly of Tin Firs/ Gentleman of 
Europe, in which Mrs. Frances Hodgson Burnett attempts 
to deodorize the fragrant George of Wales. The more I 
see of such plays the better I like men and women. Mis. 
Burnett's play is no worse than many others, no better 
than the Lyceum players act it: yet I feel it is not the 
work to bring out in me anything like the sympathy, 
benevolence, and appreciation of which I am really capa- 



ble. Taking it from the least human of standpoints— mere 
construction and plot — it is not admirable; and in the mat- 
ter of exploiting old stage tricks it is palpably inexpert. 

* • * 

In this drama of Mrs. Burnett's you are asked to believe 
in the bard luck story of a young man of the name of 
George Carteret, who, up to almost the last minute of the 
last act. wallows and sozzles in ill-fate and uncheerful- 
ness. George is an unpublished man of letters, who refused 
to marry an heiress and whose father turned him out on 
the tender mercies of Grub street. Be3'ond sundry poems, 
whose existence are only insinuated, his available assets 
consist of a Vesuvian eulogy on Charles Fox, which he 
sighs to read before the Prince of Wales. 

The first act finds George Carteret the garret lodger 
in a poor household. He is falling dismally in love with 
his landlord's daughter, who meets him a tearful half way. 
To this humble dwelling comes the naughty Prince, mas- 
querading as a lodger under title of Captain Ffolliott; for 
he, too, lias fallen in love with the girl Daphne. He 
saves her father from the press gang and the debtors' 
prison and receives in return the family's bounding grat- 
itude, while poor George eats his heart that the oppor- 
tunity and gold with which to play the hero were not given 
him instead. Safe in his disguise the Prince offers Daphne 
marriage, but her love is all for the lesser George. 

The Prince's mistress, Lady Stark, discovers the royal 
infatuation, and, with artful femininity, upsets the royal 
temper. She tells the Prince the world is laughing at a cer- 
tain Captain Ffolliott. who went courting an humble gold- 
smith's daughter, only to be beaten from the field by a 
beggarly poetaster. On top of this she amiably arranges 
an interview between the poet and the Prince, to which 
George Carteret comes beaming, armed with his panegy- 
ric and his pride. He meets the princely George, recog- 
nizes in him the perfidious Captain, and roasts him where 
he staods, as only Clyde Fitch has roasted royal Georges 
before — and, in consequence, is gently led away to jail. 

The Prince now renews his warm addresses to Daphne, 
first with a caress in his tone, then a command. He tears 
aside his mantle, exposes the costly garments of the Court 
and says: " 1 am the Prince of Wales ! " Even this does 
not dazzle Daphne; she wants her George, and onlyGeorge. 
But he is in prison for assaulting His Highness; greater 
troubles are threatening him. " It is my life against his," 
she says, and she bids farewell to father, mother, and the 
world, and agrees to sacrifice her pale, tearful purity. 

It is at this juncture that Mrs. Burnett puts her halo on 
the Prince. 

Daphne has ever been a loyal little subject of the throne, 
and has adored her Prince as one beyond the sins of mor- 
tal man; his portrait hangs over the fireplace, a thing to 
worship and to bless. Now she takes the picture from its 
altar as the idol from her heart, throws it on the floor — 
and nothing, she says, no one, can ever put it back. His 
highness lifts it tenderly: 

" Xo one," he says, " but the Prince of Wales." Daphne 
is saved. The unlucky George enters at this very minute, 
and the Prince forgives him and himself with regal good 
nature. 

Sentimental young girls and old men of soft literary 
tastes may enjoy this play, but not you and I who delight 
in cerebral pursuits, and hold the theatre to be something 
better than the seaside novelette. Mrs. Burnett's one 
clever dramatic touch is in Act II., where Lady Stark 
twits the Prince about Captain Ffolliott's defeat. And I 
never saw a clever idea more grossly abused: in the next 
act the same scene, line for line in substance, is repeated. 
This is a crime. The illusion of the whole is crudely 
managed. Mrs. Burnett asks her audience to believe in a 
great many impracticable things — particularly in the mat- 
ter of the Prince's disguise — without taking any special 
pains herself to make these things dramatically plausible, 
coherent, or stimulating to the tension of the story. One 
loses patience with The First Gentleman of Europe, and 
that is good-bye to sport in the theatre. 

# ♦ * 

Mr. Daniel Frobman's Lyceum stock consists largely of 
costumes this season. Mr. Hackett is very effulgent as 
the silk-mounted His Highness; he exalts the Prince to all 
the splendid attributes of the leading playactor of a cos- 



July 3. 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



tume company, and enters into the part with what seems 
to be corpulent satisfaction to himself. 1 could not hope 
to cope with Mr. Sackett in this admiration. Bar a few 
mannerisms— such as the wiltlos shoulders, the iliooped 
head, and the disposition to address himself more to the 
audience than to the Btage — and Mr. Edward Morgan is as 
wholly pleasing as any man has a right to be in the de- 
ng character of George Carteret. Mr. Morgan's 
voice is beautiful and sane, and he speaks the English 
language with tine accomplishment. Daphne is better 
than Miss Mannering's Flavia, and still the acting is a bit 
untidy. Miss Mannering needs concentration, her emo- 
tionalism is too scattering to have definite significance. 
And I wish she would not mode her work after Mr. 
Hackett's. Mr. Haekett has a large 3mount of bumptious 
personality, and very often his magnetism is congenial, but 
he has no art. Mr. Charles Walcot is the one established 
man-artist in this colored edition of the Lyceum company, 
and there is no excuse for his interpretation of Sir Christo- 
pher Carteret, stage-manager author or anybody else to 
the contrary. Mr. Frohman thinks enough of Mr. Wal- 
cot to permit him to kill a stage manager or an author at 
least once in every season, and this deed were better done 
than to have Mr. Walcot exposed to public view as I saw 
him Monday night. He capped a low comedy convulsion 
by wrenching off his wig and brandishing it at everybody 
in the theatre. Horrible ! Lady Stark is voluminously 
acted by Miss Maude Odel; and that adorable woman, Mrs. 
Whiffen, is visible, that is all, in the uucircumstantial role 
of Daphne's mother. Asuton Stevens. 

Next week will be the last of Francis Powers's Chinese 
melodrama at the Alcazar. New York, even London and 
Paris, it is said, are waitiug for this uuostentatious bit of 
realism. The original cast will probably be used in the 
New York production, which comes off this winter under 
David Belasco's auspices. The Biucicault play, Andy 
Blukr. is pleasantly filling out the first part of the 
Alcazar programme. Next week Miss Selina Johnston 
and Mr. George Trader, players of reputation, will appear 
in the cast of a popular adaptation from the French, A 
Victim of Circumstances, which precedes The First Born. 

On Wednesday night the Orpheum celebrated its tenth 
birthday by presenting a handsome souvenir — an illus- 
trated history of the Orpheum — to its patrons. There 
was a banquet afterwards on the stage, where the vaude- 
ville, its managers, devotees and critics, were brilliantly 
represented. Smith and Fuller are the novelties of this 
week's bill. They lure considerable quaint music from 
their bamboo instruments, but Lew Dockstader is still 
the lion of the show. His act is immense. Next week 
Miss Imogene Comer will sing barytone songs, Harry St. 
Clair will warble birdily a soprano aria, and T. W. Eckert 
and Emma Berg will sing from the Italian operas. 

Monday afternoon and evening The Prisoner of Zenda 
will be presented at the Baldwin by the Lyceum Company. 
Tuesday night and the rest of the week will be devoted to 
The Mayflower, a Pilgrim romance by Louis N. Parker, the 
author of Rosemary. The scenes embraced are Holland, 
England, and Massachusetts Bay. In The Mayflower Miss 
Tyree will make her first appearance with the company 
here. 

The Frawleys will celebrate Monday at the Columbia 
with two performances of Shenandoah. For the rest of 
the week that delightful comedy, The. Two Escutcheons. 
Theodore Hamilton will play the Baron, Miss Bates will be 
the pretty Widow, and Frank Worthing will have his old 
part — the one that introduced him to San Francisco, and 
one of the happiest bits of modern comedy acting we ever 
have seen. 

The Tivoli's Wang is up for a good run. Edwin Stevens 
and the Tivoli company are giving the best light opera 
show the town has enjoyed in many a day. The Isle of Cham- 
pagne follows. 

EL Campo is still the popular Sunday resort for those 
who want to get out of the city for a few hours. Four 
boats each way; round trip 25 cents. 

Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 
cures Poison Oak and all skin diseases. The oldest and best remedy, 
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Proprietors. 



Tivoli Opera Mouse. 



Baldwin Theatre 

Wt <•>, ,if Monday, July Mil. Third woek of Daniel Frohmau's 

LYCEUM THEATRE STOCK CO. 

s^vifti -Two hoiuinv performance*. Monday, July 5ih, mat Inoe 
iiud iiU.-ht. THE PRISONER OF ZEND A; matinee *1 popular 
holiday prior-. OommeDOl >g Tuesday, July mu, »nd for remain- 
der of week -First tirce hi-re. THE MaYFLOWKK. the 
lova htory. by Louts N Parker, eo author of "Rosomary." 

G| 1 ' TL 1 The" Gem" Theatre of the Coast. 

OlUmDia I heatre- Frledlandor, Gottlob&Co., Lessees 
and Managers. 
Monday afternoon and evening, Firth of .July Special Holiday 
Performances, SHENANDOAH. Tuesday evening, July 6th, 
and balance of week, 

THE FRAWLEY COMPANY, 

in Augustin Daly's comedy. THE TWO ESCUTCHEONS. 

. Ernestine Krelinq, 

Proprietor and Manager 

Every evening this week; the hit of the season; the eminent 
comedian, MR. EDiVIN STEVENS, in the regal production of 

WANG. 

Written by J CheeverGoodwin; musio by Woolson Morse The 
g eatest of all comic operas. Splendid cast; correct costumes; 
beautiful scenery. 

Next— First time in this city, THE ISLE OF CHAMPAGNE. 
A comedy opera in three acts. 
PopularPrices 25cand50o 

01 San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrel; 

rpnCU rn . street, between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Commencing Monday evening, July 5th. Special matinee Mon- 
day at 2 p. M. 

IMOGENE COMER, 

Queen Regent of descriptive singers; T. W. Eckert & Emma 
Berg, operatio stars: Harry Le Clair, burlesque artist; Lew 
Dockstader, America'^ greatest minstrel; Smith & Fuller, Caron 
& Herbert, Alexander Heindl, and Canfleld & Carlton. 
Reserved seats, 25c ; balcony 10c ; opera chairs and box seats 50c. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. Matinee Priees: 
Parquet, any seat, 25c; balcony any seat, 10c; children. 10c, 
any part. 

r\ 1 T*L J_ Belasco & La Faille, Lessees and Man- 

MlCaZar I neat.re. agers; Mark Thall, Director. 

Fourth of July week; extra matinee Monday. Thefarcecomedy, 

A VICTIM OF CIRCUMSTANCES. 

First appoarance of Miss Helere Johnson and Mr. Geo Trader. 
LAST VVEEK of Powers' classical Chinese drama 

THE FIRST BORN. 
Regular matinee Saturday. 

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A. W. FOSTER, Pres. and Gen'l Mgr. R X. RYAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 



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SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 3, 1897. 



" His Fortunate Once," by Gertrude Atherton. Published by D. 
Appleton .V Company, New York. 1897. 

la her most recent story Mrs. Atherton expresses much 
the same views of New York "society" as in "Patience 
Sparhawk and Her Times"; indeed, Patience herself re- 
appears casually and momentarily in this little book. His 
G race is an English Duke, who comes over to New York 
to renew his acquaintance with and propose to an Amer- 
ican girl, named Mabel Creighton. Of course, the Duke is 
in need of money, and Mabel is dying to be a Duchess. 
But Miss Creighton's "popper" suffers a serious loss in 
stocks, and is unable to " put up " the necessary amount 
of "stuff"; so the Duke, not unwisely or unnaturally, 
sheers off to Miss Forbes, the only daughter of a solidly 
wealthy man. This conduct on the part of the Duke is 
represented as mean on his part, but, for our lives, we 
cannot see why. Suppose that an American heiress dis- 
covered that the rank and title of her Jinnee were assumed, 
and that he owned no castles, ruinous or in good repair, 
would she not feel justified in breaking her engagement '. 
Would not her heart undergo a subtle change ? So, in 
common fairness, if the European nobleman finds the sup- 
posed heiress penniless and her fortune a myth, is he not 
justified (especially as ninety-nine out of every hundred 
heiresses on the continent are eagerly awaiting a chance 
to fling themselves at his head) in seeking a real fortune 
and a genuine heiress ? Why should a man who detests 
shams like a sham heiress? Would Miss Vanderbilt, or 
any rich American girl, have been quite so keen to marry 
the young Duke of Marlborough if he had turned out to be 
merely Mr. Spencer-Churchill, the Rector of Woodstock ? 
We trow not. His Grace has not far to seek: Miss Forbes 
and her mother, a very beautiful and ambitious woman, 
jump at the ducal coronet, though Ml. Forbes is violently 
opposed to international marriages, and is rash enough to 
express his dissatisfaction strongly. It is needless to say 
that the poor devil's remonstrances are entirely unheeded 
by his wife and daughter. After vainly trying to shake 
Mr. Forbes's determination, his amiable wife, who has been 
idolized by her husband, leaves him and takes her daugh- 
ter away with her, her intention being to sell her own 
houses and possessions to dower her daughter, if her hus- 
band cannot be forced to capitulate. Mr. Forbes holds 
out for so long that it is hard to see how the struggle will 
end: but Mrs. Atherton furnishes a rather startlin 
noutmmt. Though Mr. and Mrs. Forbes have been twenty- 
two years married, and have had but one child, she gives 
birth in London to another, and the news of the arrival 
of this pledge of her affection brings her husband across 
the Atlantic at once, and a reconciliation is effected. 
Though Mrs. Atherton's story is well-written, and is, we 
do not doubt, a true enough account of the feelings and 
sentiments of many of the "society people" of New York, 
it is a somewhat provoking tale. There is not a single 
character that we quite like: Mrs. Forbes is a spoilt 
beauty, ready to sacrifice, without any compunction, to 
any whim of her own, a husband who has treated her only 
too well: her daughter, Augusta, is a cold-blooded crea- 
ture, well knowing what she wants, and determined to get 
it at any cost (to others); and the Duke is almost color- 
though not without intelligence and frankness. Mr. 
Forbes is the only person we care for. and even he 
gives in at last, and "pungles up" five millions of good 
American dollars to gratify his wife, who would have met 
with her deserts if she had received a few dozen sound 
spanks with a wooden fives-racquet. Not that we think 
a British ducal coronet at all dear at live millions of 
dollars, if it must be purchased: but we would rather that 
Mr. Forbes had stood his ground to the end, not for the 
reasons that he would have given for doing so, but as a 
protest against the feminine tyranny that is so common in 
these United States. The women in this country have 
been 30 pampered, petted, spoiled, flattered, and adu- 
lated that they have forgotten whose sweat and grimy 



toil have purchased the glittering gems they so proudly 
wear: and we think that a few good, strong reminders of 
the source whence come the means of gratifying their 
luxurious tastes would do no harm. We don't at all agree 
with the doctrine that a man of power and distinction 
should be cowed by two for two score) "determined women." 
Mr. Forbes should have allowed his darling wife to sell her 
houses, yacht, and jewels to furnish her daughter's <h>< . 
she would ere long have come back to him for more, for 
she could not have lived without the appanages of wealth 
Then he would have won a victory for which she would 
have respected him more than ever in her life before. 



"A Man's Privilege," by Dora Russell. No. 257 of the Globe Library, 
published by Rand, MeNally A Co., Chicago and New York. 

This is a really quite readable and interesting tale of 
English life. The principal characters are Florence Dane, 
an heiress, Nora Ford, her companion, Stephen Wilde and 
George Herbert, young men of education. Minor charac- 
ters are Helen Pocock and her lover, Arthur Gibson, the 
curate of a London parish. Wilde and Nora Ford are the 
adventurers and villains of the story: the former, after a 
good deal of scheming, marries the heiress, murders Nora, 
and then poisons one Marsden, who had possessed himself 
of the stick with which Wilde struck Nora down. Wilde 
shoots himself just as he is being arrested for the murder 
of Marsden, and George Herbert and Florence, who bad 
loved each other all along, but had been kept apart by the 
machinations of Nora and Stephen Wilde, marry. While 
there is no subtle character-drawing, the plot is well con- 
structed, and the interest of the tale is sustained to the 
end. 

The complications and confusions resulting from the con- 
flicting divorce laws of the various States of the Union 
furnish the material for "A Questionable Marriage," a 
story by A. Shackelford Sullivan, recently published by 
Messrs. Rand, McNallv\v. Co., of Chicago. If the Supreme 
Court of the United States should decide that divorces 
granted by the courts of Oklahoma and the two Dakotas 
are invalid, hundreds of women will find themselves de- 
clared to be courtesans, and thousands of children will be 
rendered illegitimate. The question of a Federal divorce 
law is thus a highly important one. 

The National Magazine, which has hitherto been issued 
by the Bostonian Publishing Compan_v, of Boston, has been 
taken over by the Potter Publishing Company, which has 
purchased all the rights of the publication. The new pro- 
prietors will endeavor to make The National one of the 
1 best of the popular ten-cent periodicals in the market. 
The National offers a trip to Europe, extending over 
thirty-two days, and including visits to London, Paris, 
and Brussels, to any one who will secure three hundred 
subscribers at one dollar each. The National is edited by 
Mr. A. W. Tarbell. 



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July J, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 





[OW Intense); Hritisb, 
'don't ye know," the 
Sausalito Colony has become ! It always had a leaning 
that way, no doubt on account of the many English people 
in the little place: but the Anglo-Ameiican sees his Brit- 
ish brother and goes several better. TLe dwellers in that 
hilly burgh dress simply, take long tramps, go out boat- 
ing, and do a lot of quiet spooning. Music reigns in the 
homes of Osgood Hooker and Charlie Mcintosh. Claude 
Terry Hamilton does the bachelor luncheon act most 
gracefully at the " Hutch." and when Al Bowie joins the 
musical circle with Ed Sheldon as a second, the sounds 
that issue from the cottage on the hillside are said to be 
entrancing, especially if it be a lovely moonlight or star- 
light night. 

* # * 

A rumor is afloat that Mrs. J. D. Fry is about to dupli- 
cate the great success of the charity tea given at her 
beautiful house some years ago, this time to help along the 
church of her great friends, the Hemphills. Although 
nothing definite is reported, the impression prevails in 
society circles that the affair will assume reliable shape 
after the national holiday doings are over. The fact that 
so large a number ot the swim is at convenient distance 
from the city to enable an afternoon attendance, is looked 
upon as a great inducement for it materializing at this 

time. 

* * * 

What an indefatigable matron Mrs. Monroe Salisbury 
seems in getting up pleasure for her daughters and their 
young friends, and something new all the time as well. 
Her entertainment over at Haywards is said by the lucky 
folks who participated in it to have been one continuous 
delight from start to finish. No wonder Miss Kate is 
so popular a girl in society, with such an amiable mother 
to guide her. Mrs. Gordon Blanding is another lady of 
the same Southern hospitality, and her dinners are con- 
sidered some of the best in society. 

* * * 

Gossip declares that a new Richmond is in the field, 
wherein roams the elderly capitalist who evidently is look- 
ing out for a head for his handsome red-stone dwelling re- 
cently finished. The widow on the Avenue — goes the story 
— is supposed to be superseded in the old gentleman's 
affections by a widow from the country, who is so well 
known as a most hospitable chatelaine in her own house. 
It goes without saying that she would be a shining light in 
presiding over the new residence. 

* * # 

The numerous friends and admirers of our esteemed 
fellow-townsmen, George Marye and Wintield Jones, are 
jubilant to find these popular beaux returned from their 
Eastern trip unaccompanied by wives from the other side, 
as rumor so persistently affirmed their intention to wed 
while absent from their Californian homes. 

* * * 

Since the arrival of the Hagers at San Rafael, things 
have gone with a swing; even the old ladies' card parties 
have had fresh life put into them, although stakes are on 
debatable ground. However, people can do as they like 
on that point; the parlor is big enough for tables to suit 

all tastes. 

* # * 

The ladies are coaxing Colonel Fred Crocker to give an 
excursion to Castle Crags, a sort of gala picnic winding up 
with a dance at the Tavern, and promise to be forever 
grateful, etc. 

Pure Cosmetics— Professor Wenzell, the Pure Food Chemist, says of 
Mme. Marchand's Preparations Use Creme de la Creme. Positively pre- 
vents sunburn and poison oak. Price, 50 ots. 107 Geary street. 



Christian Endeavor souvenirs, official medals, pins and badges. 
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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




July 3, 1897. 



DRT4f 



IDRH M&/^CHF\M STR08R1D6ET 




THE hills are green with growing joung grass and the 
live oaks. The long, beautiful valley is sweet with 
falling petals from the fruit trees of a thousand orchards 
in bloom. And everywhere — everywhere are vineyards. 
It is the fairest and loveliest vallev of the fairest and rich- 
est of our own California. 

Overhead is the sky — sweetly, delicately blue. Not the 
blue of the turquoise, for that suggests a green tint, but 
the blue one seldom sees save in the cup of a freshly opened 
nemophile growing on the foothills, or the tender eyes of a 
little child — both dewy in their loveliness. 

And across the blue vault floats the clouds. White as 
carded wool, these great billows of slow-drifting purity 
are directed by winds that come in from the near salt sea. 

Everywhere is plenty and peace; everywhere the ex- 
quisite loveliness of Nature when she gives of herself the 
best. 

Against the foothills, seen through a faint purple haze, 
Stands a great edifice — massive, imposing, magnificent! 
In all the country 'round there is no other to compare with 
it. It is surrounded by acres of green turf and brightened 
by numberless beds of brilliant-hued flowers, through 
which run graveled walks. Rare trees from every clime 
have been planted here, and the care and improvements 
of the grounds give evidence to a lavish expenditure of 
money as well as great taste. 

If you approach near to the great dark building or walk 
about the grounds, you will always bear the murmur of 
conversation or the echo of a laugh. It is not a place of 
silence or of solitude. To-day there are people scattered 
about the grounds in the warmth of the balmy spring sun- 
shine. It is a scene fair and'good to look upon. 

Apart from the others is a young woman whose face will 
attract you more by its plaintive smile and the wistful ex- 
pression of her great eyes than by any charm of feature or 
coloring. 

If you should talk with her — she is shy and does not 
readily make acquaintance; but the time may come when 
you can learn the way to friendship, and so win her to 
speech — she may tell you of the one thought that is ever 
uppermost in her mind : 

"I am the happiest girl in all the wide, wide world; be- 
cause," and over her face will spread a rapt look, trans- 
figuring it as the gray eyes gaze, with dilated pupils, at 
the far hills beyond, and her voice sinks to a whisper, '"I 
am to marry Robert Wade next week. I, Aldyth Barton!" 

A scene that is one of unsurpassed loveliness. A heart 
that seems filled with unalloyed joy. 

But, oh ! the pity and the pathos of it all ! For the 
great building standing in its grandeur, silhouetted against 
the soft violet hills, is the Insane Asylum of the State; the 
people grouped about on the shaven lawns are those among 
the inmates who are the most docile; and the gray-eyed 
girl, too, is mad. 

***** 

STes, 1 am Mrs. Robert Blair. Please be seated." As 
she replied she herself sank slowly into one of the luxuri- 
ous chairs of the exquisitely appointed room, and looked 
inquiringly at her visitor. 

A little old lady, with a strained, frightened look on her 
face, peering out of an old-fashioned bonnet, began fum- 
bling under the folds of her shawl as she dropped into a 
chair opposite the beautiful stately woman. Her tn-m- 
bling fingers brought forth a cabiuet photograph — the 
photograph of a handsome man of perhaps forty-five. On 
the back was written, "To Aldyth from Robert Wade." 

" Do you know that man'.' She asked the question 
eagerly, yet fearfully. 

" I do. He is my husband.' Then, as she turned it 
over and read the inscripti. .n the back, she added, 
"Robert Wade Blair," while a burning blush rose to her 



temples. A cry of pain burst from the little old lady in 
the garb of a bygone date. 

"Oh, how could he be so base — how could any man be so 
cruel to my little Aldyth, my poor child? Oh, how am I — 
her mother — to tell her ? " 

Tears welled, to fall on the wrinkled cheeks, while t'ue 
mouth quivered piteously. 

The other woman flushed as though a half-expected blow 
was being directed toward her. "Tell me all," she said. 
"It is better that I should know." The color had receded, 
leaving her very pale but calm, as they are who have 
borne much and have learned to look for still other crosses 
to bear. 

" You are his wife ! How can I tell you of the way he 
has wrecked my child's life? But I must — I must ! She 
is all I have; how am I to go home to her and say, 'Put 
away this sewing— you will never wear it — there will be 
no marriage — he is already a married man ! ' 

" She has been stenographer for Danforth, Dane & Bay- 
lor, the attorneys; and what she earned was our sole sup- 
port, When the elevator fell there last year she was hurt, 
though not, badly, and Mr. Wade (he told us his name was 
Wade — Robert Wade) saw it happen and brought her home 
in a carriage. Then he called to inquire after, and was 
kind and thoughtful for her, and got to coming often; and 
soon we counted him a friend. Then — oh, I don't know 
how it happened, for he was so much older, but it seemed 
to make no difference — Aldyth loved him. 

"First, it was only flowers he brought her; flowers, and 
books, or a box of bonbons. But soon he began offering 
beautiful and expensive presents which she would not take; 
she would have none of these except the betrothal ring 
when he asked her to be his wife. ' When we are married 
I will take them,' she would tell him; ' not now.' And he 
would have given her everything. And she was shy about 
showing her love. 'Wait till we are married,' she would 
say; and it made him all the more eager. He said they 
must be married soon; but no day was set until yesterday, 
when he came to the house for a moment, and said they 
would be married next week very quietly, and go away to 
Europe for a year. The engagement had been secret — 
he wished it so; for he said his widowed sister, with whom 
he lived, was opposed to his marrying at all. And she told 
no one-*she always obeyed him, she loved him so! To-day 
while she was out buying some of the things for her simple 
wedding finery (he had wanted to provide it all for her, 
such beautiful things, liut she would not listen to him) a 
friend called, and saw this photograph on the mantel where 
Aldyth had left it — forgetting; for he had always cautioned 
her not to show it, or ever say she knew him. 

" ' Do you know Mr. Blair ? ' my friend asked, taking it 
up. And forgetting caution, I answered: 

' ' That is not his name; it is Mr. Wade — the man whom 
Aldyth is soon to marry.' 

"'Marry!' she cried, 'why, he has a wife now. That 
is Robert W. Blair, one of the richest men in the city (and 
some say one of the gayest). There must be some mis- 
take ! ' 

"But just then she turned the picture over and saw on 
the back the name 'Robert Wade,' and she cried, 'Oh, 
dear Mrs. Barton, I hope — oh, I hope he has not been de- 
ceiving Aldyth; but what I tell you is true. He lives in 
that beautiful house opposite the Van Benthuysings on 
Pacific Avenue, and is a'married man, I know.' 

"I could not believe ber. I prayed it was not so. Then 
I came here to know the truth. I have told you all there 
is to tell, and you have said he is your husband; but, what 
am I to tell my child? " 

She held her hands out supplicatingly toward her hearer 
as if she could give her help, and peace. Mrs. Blair's 
eyes were filled with infinite sorrow for the woman whose 



July 3, 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



miserable grief was for the daughter at borne stitching 
happy thoughts in with the threads she sewed Into her 
wedding gown. Layiog her soft white hand on the 
wrinkled ones that trembled so under her touch, she said 
gently— compassionately. 

"My heart aches for you and your injured daughter. 
God knows I wish I could" spare you, but it is best that 
you know the truth from me. His part will be to make 
excuses for something that nothing ever can excuse. 
This is his house — his home. I am his wife." And as she 
caught a glimpse of a youug girl crossing the broad hall, 
she raised her voice slightly: 

"Muriel, dear, come here a moment; I want you." 

A tall, sweet looking girl of twelve or thirteen walked 
into the room and stood by her mother. 

"This is my daughter, Muriel, Mrs. Barton. My child, 
will you go up to my room and get papa's photograph 
that is in the filagree silver frame, and send it down to me 
by Stanley? It is on my table." 

A few minutes after, a bright-faced pretty boy of, per- 
haps ten years of age entered the reception room, bring- 
ing the silver framed photograph. "Here is papa's pic- 
ture, mama," he said. 

"Thank you, Stanley," she answered. "This is my son," 
said she, turning to the elder woman. Then she handed 
her the picture. 

The photograph in the frame was identical with the one 
she held in her hand. 

***** 

A month later a group of five people were seated to- 
gether on the sunlighted veranda of the Hotel del Monte 
at Monterey. A handsome, middle aged man was listen- 
ing to two children — a girl of twelve, and a boy a year or 
two younger — dilate upon the wonderful adventures of the 
morning while awheel. A woman of marked refinement 
of feature, but whose expression was that of one not 
quite happy, was seated near; listening to a pretty, 
vivacious girl who was reading aloud extracts from the 
letters she held in her hand, occasionally interpolating re- 
marks of her own. 

"And to think that brother Will must be annoyed now 
by losing his stenographer, just when he and Mr. Dane 
and Mr. Baylor are all so rushed with business. Miss 
Barton was an expert stenographer, and so competent in 
every way, and understood the business of the office so 
well, that it will be a horrid nuisance not having her. 

"It seems she was engaged to be married to a Mr. 
Wade, or some such name, and he jilted her. At first, 
they thought she didn't care — that she hadn't been very 
much in love with him, after all, for she took his treat- 
ment so quietly, almost indifferently, they say. But sud- 
denly she went raving insane, and had to be taken to the 
Napa Insane Asylum, incurable. Dreadful, is n't it?" 

The woman who listened looked across at the man who 
was listening, too. His face flushed darkly; otherwise he 
gave no sign that he heard. But her eyes were filled with 
a scorn, utter and immeasurable; and her face went white 
with pity for the girl whose life story was done. 

The story of Aldyth. A tale that is sadder than the 
story of Youth touched by the hand of Death; yet is it 
for the young girl you would sorrow? The fate that bereft 
her of reason left her Hope and Joy, where she wanders 
through the lanes and byways of a strange vale that to us 
is ever unknown. Not for her shall we grieve; but rather 
give of pity to the woman whose everlasting shame and 
humiliation is that she is the wife of Robert Blair. 



The Argonauts of old were gallant and brave adventurers; hence, 
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without a superior and has rarely an equal. Once tasted, its flavor 
is never forgotten. All connoisseurs drink Argonaut. E. Martin & 
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Quaint, ample, refined, Swain's restaurant, at 213 Sutter street, 
sets a splendid dinner every day between the hours of 5 and 8 o'clock, 
which is especially patronized by ladies who may happen to find 
themselves down town between those honrs. The cooking is of the 
best and the service perfect. 

Look in Carmany's Window for the most stylish gentlemen's tur- 
nishing goods. 25 Kearny street. 

Indigestion dies where Jackson's Napa Soda lives. 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 3, 1897. 




The State 

Mining Bureau 

mining industry. 



The New York management of the 
Speculative Standard Consolidated will, with their 
Values Killed, knowledge of a market for mining invest- 
ment, be surprised possibly at the dull 
inquiry at this end for shares in the new combination com- 
pany. The argument probably will be that under an 
honest and efficient management the public are safe in 
their investment, and that therefore they should the more 
readily place their money in the scheme. Unfortunately, 
however, this community on the Pacific Coast is not built 
up on the Sunday-school plan, when it comes down to min- 
ing investments. What they like is an active market 
which will permit the indulgence of a gambling propensity 
as strong now as it ever was in pioneer days. Dividend- 
paying stocks were never popular in the local mining 
market. They might suit a few old fogies who didn't 
know any better, but a rattle out of the box on Lady 
Bryan, Pictou, and other 'cats'' of infamous memory, 
always captured the crowd, and always will for many a 
decade to come, until the leaven of righteousness working 
in gradually from the East acts the oracle. Uncle Bill 
Lent made Bodie hum in his day. and could again up to 
the time it dropped into the Standard control, had he 
chosen to emerge from bis shell. Bulwer and Mono al! 
were likely stocks on the Exchange until the same change 
was made, and the curtain dropped on the scene of many 
a lively mining deal. That tne plans of the Standard 
rieople are the more honorable, it must be admitted, but 
as for being correct from the speculative standpoint, is 
another question apt to provoke a discussion as to whether, 
after all, honesty is the best policy in this particular field 
of industry. 

State Mineralogist Cooper has conceived 
an idea of preparing a register of Cali- 
fornia mines in a form which must com- 
mend itself to all connected with the 
Ft is the most sensible proposition 
which has emanated from this quarter for some years 
past, tending, as it does, to prove the practical utility of 
an institution which, had it continued under a regime like 
the last, would have served the public better by its total 
abolishment. The new scheme will give everyone a fair 
show. The poor miner, as well as the rich, will be repre- 
sented, and "class" will not be a distinguishing feature of 
reports published at the expense of taxpayers. It will 
also obliterate a suggestion of advertising which must 
arise in the most unbiased mind when columus and maps 
are devoted to certain properties and districts, while 
others equally valuable, if not more so, are dismissed with 
bare notice. Some recent reports are anything but cred- 
itable to their compilers if they only but knew it, and the 
more one studies the matter dished up, the less surprise 
there is that a 'kick was coming." The only wonder is 
that there was not more complaint, this being avoided no 
doubt by recent changes for the better, with every possi- 
bility for an improvement in the fuluie. The superin- 
tendents and owners of mines should do all in the ir uower 
to assist Mr. Cooper in his new work, which will be, when 
completed, of great benefit in advancing the interests of 
California mining. 

Sierra Nevada has not only puzzled, but 
The Pine annoyed the shorts during the week, the 
Street Market, price climbing until it got above 90 cents, 
threatening at one time to touch the dol- 
lar mark. The advance is based on the efforts of bear 
operators to fill on the strength of an improvement in the 
mine fraught with more than ordinary significance in its 
bearing on the future of the mine. The activity in this 
quarter has made itself felt in all directions, and brokers 
have been kept busier than for months past. At the 
south end Jacket had a lively upward turn, and people 
who had bought at low figures g jt a chance to double their 
money. Most of the north and south end stocks were 
higher during the week, and the market closes for the 
holidays with a healthier tone than it has had for many a 
day. 



Now that there is talk of the sale of the Es- 
Esperanza peranza, Mine of Mexico, which has so sud- 
of Mexico, denly loomed up above the horizon, people 
will naturally be anxious to know something 
about the property. It is located on what is known as the 
El Oro district, in the State of Mexico, and is owned by A. 
Sahlberg, who located the ground some few years ago, with 
Messrs. Mendez, and Requenna, all residents of the City of 
Mexico. It is a gold mine, well-developed, and is now 
looked upon as one of the most promising properties in the 
Republic. The mine is worked by tunnels, and the aver- 
age value of the ore is placed at $30 per ton. An electric 
plant has just been put in. Mr. Lane's connection with 
the property has been announced. He holds a four months' 
option on it, for which he put up $100,000 in Mexican 
money with the Esperanza y Anexas Mining Company. 
Should the sale not be consummated, this sum is to be for- 
feited. The Directors of the Company have no power to 
close the deal, although a general meeting of the stockhold- 
ers can do so, but this is a mere formality of law. The stock 
has, so far, been quoted at $1,500 per share, but it has 
jumped to $1,850 on a prospect of a sale. There is some 
talk of an offer from the English of £450,000 having been 
already refused. The Lane proposition is about $3,000,- 
000 in American money or £000,000 sterling. 

State Mineralogist Cooper has issued a bul- 
CaMfonia's letin, showing the mineral productions of 
Gold Yield. California for 1896 by counties and compar- 
ing them with the productions of 1895. The 
table shows Nevada County to be away in the lead, with a 
mineral production for the" year 1890" of $2,392, ICO. In 
1895 the mineral production of Nevada County was $1,795.- 
391. Hi, showing a gain of $596,709.26. The next greatest 
producer of precious metals is Placer County, with an out- 
put valued at $1,735,7511 55, an increase over the preced- 
ing year of over $100,000. Amador County is third in the 
scale, with an output of $1.593, 021, an increase of $150,000. 
Fourth in the scale is Calaveras, with an output valued at 
II .555.888.85. This is a falling off from 1895 of nearly 
$200,000. Trinity County shows an output oi $1,435,365, 
$130.11110 ineiease over the preceding year. The total 
mineral production of the State for 1896 is stated to be 
$24,291,298, an increase of $1,446,734 over 1895. 

The mining industry in this State keeps 
Gold Mining picking up quietly all the time, with active 
In California development work progressing in every 
direction. The promoter has made a 
rank failure of nearly everything which he has backed so 
far. A few London jobbers have put a few pounds here 
and there to hold an option upon property until circum- 
stances favored working the dragnet process all over 
Great Britain. The fall may see tbem successful, and it 
may not, for the reason that offices of this description in 
London are looked upon with more or less suspicion by the 
better class of investors, and very likely so. California 
has suffered in reputation in the past by just such 
schemers, and with such examples before them as the 
Ilex, Josephine, Union Gold, and a dozen other rascally 
conceptions of the prom Her, can it be wondered that for- 
eign investors are inclined to fight shy of ventures from 
this end which may end in a similar manner ? 

Can any of our readers in the California 
An Unknown mining world locate that particular circle 
Bonanza. of industry in which the "Quartz and 
Tailing Mining Company," of Amador 
County, moves and has had its being? A shareholder who 
owns stock in the concern, but who never yet has been in 
a position to locate the site of his investment, would be 
benefited by the information. We must confess that in 
this case it has been found impossible to assist this new 
seeker after light in any way. No one seems to know 
anything of this concern, which, while in full bloom in Lon- 
don, was, until now, apparently "born to blush unseen" 
in the fastnesses of Amador. Any information on the 
subject will be appreciated. 

THE gold exports from Western Australia during last 
month amounted to 59,111 oz., against 39,660 oz. for 
April and 22,266 oz. in May last year. This is a record 
which should give a fillip to the revival in the market. The 
total for 1892 was 59,548 oz.— only a few hundred ounces 
more than the exports last month. 



July 3, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«3 




•• 






■Hear the Crlcrr" "Wkn the devil art thouf 
'One thai will pl»v the Jcvil.ilr. wllh rem." 



IT is do easy matter to get competent ushers for the 
theatres as few young men have the requisite know- 
ledge of millinery. Until an ordinance is passed compelling 
anyone who wishes to qualify as an usher to serve an ap- 
prenticeship in a reputable millinery establishment it 
would be well if Dr. Rottanzi or some enterprising milliner 
would issue a small technical handbook dealing with the 
intricate question of the constitutional differences between 
a hat and a bonnet and so put an end to the arguments 
which these distracted young gentlemen at present hold 
in the lobbies to the disturbance of play-goers. 

SOME men never know when they are well off. Abner 
Forsythe, the San Francisco septuagenarian who has 
just been bunkoed while visiting in the wilds of Portland, 
Oregon, says that he thinks Providence has cursed him by 
taking from him consecutively his nine wives, whose loss 
he still mourns. Of course it must consume a good deal of 
a man's time to see that nine graves are kept green, but 
Abner does not appraise the favoritism of Providence at 
its real value. Suppose the whole nine were alive and 
kicking about his last will and testament, or trying to 
claim alimony from their dear hubby? 

MISS ROWENA REED, a California girl of brain and 
muscle, has distinguished herself at Vassar as a 
sprinter and high jumper. Aside from the refreshing fact 
that Miss Reed has gone in for physical feats, in prefer- 
ence to stage notoriety or any old thing that will keep her 
in the public eye, it is gratifying to see the healthful ex- 
ample she has set for her sex hereabouts. Too many of 
them, in a mad desire to "enjoy" life, confine their sprint- 
ing powers to a down gradej aided by tete-a-tete French 
dinners and cold bots. 

JU[ ARY YELLIN' LEASE'S twelve-year-old daughter 
"\_ is described as a political prodigy, qualified to give 
the President himself any tips necessary as to the running 
, of the administration machine, and fears are already en- 
tertained that, escaping from Popper Lease's apron 
strings, this awful child, cradled in suffrage and nourished 
on Populism in lieu of the maternal fount, will come West 
on a lecturing tour. Nit! We draw the line at this Kan- 
sas grasshopper. A Girl Orator? Zounds! A Boy 
Orator is trouble enough. 

»<TMS well that Dr. David Starr Jordan's scientific hand 
1 is not required to operate upon the Cliff House seals, 
whose value consists not in their hides but in their bark. 
Sutro, Duke of the rocky Heights, would raise a howl 
sufficient to drown out his entire marine band, should the 
learned emissary of the Administration essay to use upon 
the animals the government brand, instead of a bas re- 
lief of the ex-Mayor. 

WITH praiseworthy zeal the Grand Jury is trying to 
prod the political epidermis that encases the Police 
Department officials, in order that they may get a move 
on concerning the bogus lottery companies that are now 
flourishing here and robbing the credulous. It is dollars to 
peanuts, however, that the bogus lottery vampire will con- 
tinue to gather in its prey under Police Department 
surveillance. 

THE increase of suicide in Chicago is alarming. Nearly 
forty cases were reported in twenty-five days of June 
and the authorities say they do not know the cause. Not 
yet perhaps but they soon will, when he has been with 
them a little longer. The ministrations of Dr. C. O. 
Brown are death on any place. 

CHARLES FROHMAN is evidently turning his back on 
America as he has announced his intention of having 
his headquarters in London, and though he will still have 
quarters in New York, they can only be his hindquarters. 

AMERICA has sent her Ministering Angel to Turkey. 
He has gone by way of Paris, but it is to be hoped he 
will not think he hBs got back to heaven and take up a 
permanent abode there. 



CAR conductors are most certainly looming up on the 
local horizon with meteoric brilliancy Conductor 
McManus, who was bounced from his platform and de- 
prived of his job for playing the races, is now a famous 
sport with a .lay Gould-Astorbilt reputation for wealth; 
and a festive bell-puncher was recently arrested for im- 
printing fervent kisses upon the wrinkled brow of a 
spinster passenger. To the Chief's discriminating taste 
the latter savors of lunacy. 

IT is said that several thousand tramps are headed for 
this State, and that they are reminded of the attrac- 
tions of California by the convention of the Christian En- 
deavorers that is to be held here. Possibly Weary Wag- 
gles and his friends hope to subsist, on their long tramp 
over the desert and through the mountain passes, upon 
•the remnants of cold lunches, Boston baked beans, and 
other fragments which will probably bestrew the route 
chosen by the abstemious and enthusiastic Endeavorers. 

THE Mormons are going to have a jubilee in Salt Lake 
City, and have invited several of our leading citizens 
to attend it in recognition of their allegiance to Mormon- 
ism. These gentlemen, though never parading their re- 
ligion before us, for obvious reasons, have yet adhered 
steadfastly to the practical side of the Mormon faith; some 
have even suffered persecution for it, and it is expected 
will be received with high honors at the forthcoming fes- 
tival. 

JACKSON, the car conductor, whose ambition to do 
amateur detective work, in trailing a suspected 
shover of the queer resulted in his arraignment for robbery, 
has set a glowing example for professional sleuths. The 
latter can apparently follow a clew for a lifetime without 
running it down, while the former secured his object on a 
trial trip and without the stimulus of a regular salary. 

MISAPPREHENSION has been caused by the state- 
ment that Corbett claims a seat from Oregon in the 
Senate, it being inferred that Pomp. Jim aspired to the 
toga, whereas it is another Corbett altogether. Besides, 
Jim was seated from Nevada some time ago, and seated 
so hard that his contact with mother earth caused a vio- 
lent seismic disturbance in the pugilistic world. 

THE burning words which men in moments of madness 
write to the objects of their adoration, do not by any 
means appear to cool with the passing of time or the 
change of their sentiments. Indeed, they may at any 
period be produced in court with power not only to roast 
the hapless writer but to keep him in hot water indefin- 
itely. Vide the court calendar. 

" ^T\HE quality of mercy is not strained," except when 
1 it is made to perform the functions of Justice. The 
suit brought against Middlekauf of Stockton by Miss Alice 
Owens, whom he punched in the ribs, was dismissed from 
Judge Campbell's court, because in the Judge's opinion the 
gentleman didn't mean any barm. Middlekauf is reported 
to have considerable money ! 

LIL, the adipose nuisance now obstructing the Washing- 
ton sidewalks and exhibiting her hula hula curves to 
the non-admiring gaze of the Senators, is a rank failure as 
a lobbyist but an undoubted success as a Hawaiian hoodoo. 
The only objection to annexation is the possible prospect 
that Her Obese Highness will be included in the goods. 

THE Examiner is ever ready to succor the oppressed 
just as the Town Crier is ever ready to oppress the 
sucker. Recognizing how many forms of entertainment 
are only fit for men, it magnanimously issues a weekly 
publication which is only fit for women and children. 

ftNOTHER queer story comes from Chicago. They say 
that wild birds may be seen in the very heart of the 
city, on vacant lots and along the water front. We were 
surprised to hear about the quail and the shrike, though 
we all knew about the jays. 

DR. CLIFFORD, who disturbed the slumber of the 
Kellys with his piano-playing scorned their threats 
and said he had a pull with Judge Campbell. So he had, 
but not the kind he meant, for Whiskerandos pulled his 
leg for forty dollars. 

A MAN who robs a grave is called a ghoul. By what 
name shall we designate him whose crime is a thou- 
sand times more odious — that of robbing the defenceless 
dead of their reputation? 



'4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 3, 1897. 







THE KING IS DYING— james kenyon, the gate of dheams. (moulton) 

Fool, stand back, the king is dying, 
him what little air remains; 
-t thou not how his pulse is Hying? 
Hear'st thou not how he gasps and strains 
To catch one other stertorous breath ? 
<iod! how he labors! yes, this is death ! 

Blow up the (ire— bis feet are cold ; 
Ay. though a king, he cannot buy 

liriefest moment with all his gold; 
His hour has come, and he must die ; 
tered and wrinkled, and old and gray. 
The king fares out on the common way. 

Light the tapers; he's almost gone; 

^iir. thoo fool, 'tis past the hour 
To cower and cringe, and flatter and fawn— 

The thing lying there is shorn of power; 
Henceforth the lips of the king are dumb; 
Bring up thy ghostly viaticum. 

Absolve his soul; need enough, God wot! 

Mumble and sprinkle and do thy shriving; 
Yet. metbinks, here and there shall be left a blot, 

Hideously fool, despite thy striving; 
Nor pur Ned quilts, nor pillows of lace. 
Can relieve the guilt in that grim old face. 
Bofl ! stand back— it is his last : 

Gel hence, thy priestly craft is o'er; 
1 or him the pomp of the world is past— 

The king that was, is king no more ; 
Let the hells be rung, let the mass be said. 
And the king's heir know that the king is dead. 

MAKING B'LIEVE — annie Hamilton donnell. is youth's companion. 

I've maked bTieve I was mamma, 

And been to the bargain store. 
But the bargain (the baby) wiggled so 
I couldn't ptay that any more. 
1 've maked b'lieve I wa3 C'lumbus, 

And discovered the world all over, 
The rug was the 'Lantic ocean, 

And 1 sailed on the nursery sofa. 
I've maked b'lieve f was an Indian, 

And scalped Polyphemia twice, 
And I played be a big polar bear, 

With the looking-glass for ice. 
I've maked bTieve I was the doctor, 

With pearl tapioca pills. 
Bat 1 was 'bliged to give up practice, 

'< '..me I couldn't c'lect my bills. 
Two times I've b'lieved to be a circus, 

Ami two times the coal man, too. 
And once I was R ibiosoo Crusoe, 

And once I was III tie Boy Blue. 
Oh, I've maked b'lieve and I've maked b'lieve, 

Till there's nothing else to be! 
And now— I'm so hungry, mamma— 

Let's make b'lieve I was me. 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

RESTAURANTS. 
Bergez's Restaurant, Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street, below Mont- 
gomery. Rooms for ladies and families; private entrance. John Bergez 
Proprietor. 
Malson Tortoni, French Rotisserie, 111 O'Farrell street. Private dining 

rooms and banquet hall. S. Constantinl, Proprietor. 
Poodle Dog Restaurant, S. E. cor. Grant ave. and Bush st. Private 

dining and banquet rooms. Tel. 429. A. B.Blanco &B Brpn, 

DENTISTS. 
Dr. Franklin Pancoast removed to 20 O'Farrell street, rooms 16, 17 & 26 
Dr. R. Cutlar, 81 8 Sutter street. 

MEDICAL. 
Dr. Hall, 14 McAllister St.. near Jones. Diseases of women and children. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
Selections on approval: any place In world. W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan 
The W. H. Hollls Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105 O'Farrell St.,S. F. 

BOILER MAKERS. 
P. F. Dundon's San Francisco Iron Works, 314, 316, and 318 Main street. 
Iron Work of every description designed and constructed. 

CANDIES. 
Maillard's Chocolates in 'i and Mb boxes. Roberts', Polk and Bush. 

LADIES' HAIR DRESSING. 
Hermann Schwarze (known as Hermann at Strozynski's) has opened 
Ladies' Hair Dressing Parlors at 211 Powell st. Telephone Main 5b20 



THE OLD, OLD STORY-row* topics. 

They met last nigbt at a crowded hall, 
ll was ten years since they parted; 

itfa remembered that anguished time 
When they thought they were broken-hearted. 
' You haven't changed in the least I" he said, 
As he noted the gray in her hair, 
And the rouge that took the place of the blush 
' rn her cheek, that had been so fair. 
' Nor you!" she answered, with a smile, 
e wondered how she ever 
1 have cared (or a man so commonplace, 
She could understand it 

And they talked to each other a little while, 

And both were intensely bored, 
And he thanked tbi La sweet young wife. 

And she for her presen 



BANKING. 



Bank of British Columbia. 

SODTBEAST COR. BCSH AND SANSOHE STS. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

Capital Paid Up S3,000,0C0 

Reserve Fund * suu.uuu 

HEAD OFFICE 60 Lombard Street, London 

Branches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster. Kamloops, Nan- 
iimo, Nelson, Sandon, and Kaslo, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available In all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada ; Cbicago— First National Bank ; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company 01 
Sydney, Ld ; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

The flnglo-Galilornian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized 16.000.000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 

Paid Up l,50U,uuu 

Reserve Fund 700.000 

N. E. Cob. Pise and Sansome Sts 
Head OrricE— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. ION. STEINHART | M 

P. N. LILIENTRAL f Managers 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

No. 626 California Street. San Francisco 

Guarantee capital and surplus $2 040 201 66 

Capital actually paid up In cash. 1000 000 00 

Deposils December 81, 1896 27,7 217 45 

OFFICERS: President, B A. Becker; First Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer: Second Vice-Presldeijt, H. Horslmau; Cashier, A. H. R Schmidt: 
Assistant Cat bier. William Herrmann: Secretary. George Touroy ; Assist- 
ant Secretary. A. H. Muller: Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: B A Becker. Daniel Meyer H Horst- 
raann. Ign. Steiohart, N. Van Bergen, E. Ronte, H B. Russ, D. N. 
Walter and N. Ohlandt 

Wells Fargo & Go.'s Bank. 

N. E. CORNER SANSOME & SUTTER STREETS 

John J. Valentine President 

Homer S.King Manager 

H. Wadswor i h Cashier 

F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

Cash Capital and Surplus 16,250,000 

BRANCHES. 
NY. City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldrldge, Henry 
E Huntington. Homer S. King, George E.Gray, John J. McCook, Charles 
F. Crocker, Dudley Evann. 

Security Savings Bank. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 

interest paid on deposits. 

LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 
William Alvord S. L. Abbott, Jr. H.H.Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O D Baldwin E J. McCutchen 

Adam Grant W.S.Jones J.B.Lincoln 



July 3. 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'5 






BANKING. 



■ » 



A certain five-year-old boy who, in his earliest trousers, 
could only thrust his hands Ihrough his belt for want of 
pockets, had his heart rejoiced at last with a pair of 
trousers which had real pockets in them. His first act 
was to come down to a male relative with his hands stuck 
proudly in these pockets and to exclaim: "Look! I've 
got pockets with floors iu 'em'" — Boston Transcript. 

It was past midnight and Mr. Ivremort was fumbling 
about in the hall and mumbling angrily to himself. 
"What's the matter?" called out Mme. Ivremort from the 
floor above. "There's two hatracks here," he answered, 
"an' I don't know which one to hang my hat on." "Oh, 
bang one on each and come to bed." — Petit Journal Pour 
Rire. 

"I guess," said the bank cashier, "that the rumor of the 
engagement of Miss Cumrox to a member of the European 
nobility must have some foundation." "What makes you 
think so?" inquired the president. "Mr. Cumrox was just 
here to see whether we wouldn't let him sign checks with a 
rubber stamp hereafter. — Washington Star. 

"Young man," said Senator Sorghum, "be sure to lay 
by something for a rainy day." "I intend to save some- 
thing every year." "That's right. Only, if you ever get 
to be a United States Senator, don't boast of laying by 
too much, all in the same year, as itmay create comment. " 
— Washington Star. 

A near-sighted girl happened to pass a furnishing store 
and glanced at .the show window. She checked a scream 
and said to her companion: "Oh, please come here and 
relieve my suspense." "How?" "Tell me what I am 
looking at, boa constrictors or bicycle stockings?" — Bos- 
ton Transcript. 

"Lem'me see,'' said the studious boarder. ' "It was Una, 
wasn't it, who trimmed the claws of the lion? I wonder 
how she got him to consent?" "My recollection is," said 
Ashbury Peppers, "that she said she wanted to show him 
something new in toe clips." — Detroit Free Press. 

George — Do you know what I've a mind to do? Bessie 
— No. George— I've a mind to kiss you. Bessie— Oh, 
George, I'm so glad it wasn't true! George — Glad what 
wasn't true? Bessie — Why, Nellie Bassett told me that 
you hadn't any mind. — Cleveland Leader. 

"Maud isn't doing very well this year," said the Sweet 
Young Thing. "I told her," said the other Sweet Young 
Thing, "that her '96 model methods of flirtation wouldn't 
do." Meanwhile the sad sea soaked the sands. — Cincinnati 
Enquirer. 

"Will you have me for better or for worse?" he asked. 
"What a foolish question, George," she answered. "How 
can I tell whether it will be for better or for worse? We've 
just got to take chances. That's all." — Chicago Post. 

"Man put up our fly screens this morning." "Yes." 
"He left two flies on the inside, and my wife has been chas- 
ing them so long that she's too tired to speak." — Cleve- 
land Plain Dealer. 

"It takes my wife three days to go to a picnic." "How 
is that?" "She takes a day to get ready; a day to go and 
a day to get over it." — Chicago Record. 



NEW SAFE-DEPOSIT VAULTS. 

Safes $4.00 to $150.00 Per Annum— The Union Trust Com- 
pany's new safety vaults, corner of Market and Montgomery streets, 
are the strongest, best guarded, and best lighted in the city. 
Superior accommodation for its patrons. Ladies will find apart- 
ments for their exclusive use. The company transacts a general 
banking, trust, and savings business, and acts a executor, adminis- 
trator, trustee, and as custodian of wills, and consults as to trust 
matters without charge. 

Valuables of all kinds taken on storage. 

Other waters try— Jac kson's Napa Soda gets th ere. 
When dizzy or drowsy take Beecham's Pills. 



California Sale Deposit and Trust Company. 

Cor. California and Montgomery Sts. 
Capital Fully Paid .... 41,000,000 

Transacts a general hanking business 
and allows Interest on deposits payable oo demand or after notice 

Acts as Executor, Administrator, end Trustee under wills or In any 
other trust capacity. Wills are drawn by the company's attorney 
arc taken care of without charge. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES to rent at prices from $5 per annum up- 
ward acooraine to size, and valuables of all kinds are stored at low rates. 

DlH* inns: J. D Fry, Henry Williams, I. G. Wickersham. Jnoob C. 
Johnson, James Treadwell, F. W. Loupee. Henry I\ Kortmann, R B. Wal- 
lace. R. D. Fry. A. D. Sharon and J. Dalzell Brown. 

Officers: J. D Fry, President; Henry Williams. Vice-President: R. 
D Fry. Second Vice-President; J. Dalzoll Brown, Secretary and Treas- 
urer; E E, Shot-well, Assistant Secretary; Gunnison, Booth & Bartnett, 
Attorneys. 

Mutual Savings Bank ol San Francisco. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, 
Mechanics' Institute Buildino 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000 

Paid-Up Capital 9 300,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President. S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 

JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 
Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James Mofflt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert MoElroy, 
and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks. When opening accounts send signatuie. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits. Deo. 31, 1895 824,402,327 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1,575,631 

ALBERT MILLER, President | E. B. POND, Vice-President 
Directors— Thomas Magee.G. W. Beaver, Philip Barth; Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fremery, George C. Boardman, Rohert Watt: Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility ol this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 
pass-book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9. A. M. to 3 p. M. Saturday even- 
ings, 6:30 to 8. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited. 

N.W. Cor. Sansomb & Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital (2,500,000 

Paid TJp Capital J2.0O0.000 

Reserve Fund 6 850,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard,. Freres 
& Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM) Mana „. a 
C. ALTSCHTJL J- Managers. 

GroGker-Woolworth National Bank of S. F. 

Corner Market, Montgomery, 

and Post Streets. 

Paid-Up Capital (1,000,000 

WM. H.CROCKER.,, President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W.KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Chas. F. Crocker, E. B. Pond, Hy. J.Crocker, Geo. W. Scott 

The Sather Banking Gompanu. 

Successor to Sather & Co. 

Established 1851, San Francisco. 

Capital 11,000,000 

James K, Wilson President. Albert Miller, Vice-President 

L. I. Cowgill. Cashier. F. W. Wolfe, Secretary. 

Directors— C. S. Benedict, E G. Lukens, F. W. Sumner, Albert Mil 
ler Wm. P. Johnson, V. H. Metcalf, James K. Wilson. 

Agents : New York— J. P. Morgan & Co. Boston — National Bank of the 
Commonwealth. Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago — Continental Na- 
tional Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First Na- 
tional Bank. London — Brown, Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co 

Bank of California, San FranGisGO. 

Capital and Surplus, $6,000,000 

WILLIAM ALVORD .President | CHARLES R. BISHOP. .Vice-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith.... Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. Motjlton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston— The Tremont Na- 
tional Bank; Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Union National 
Bank. Philadelphia— National Bank of the Republic. St. Louis— Boat- 
man's Bank. Virginia City (Nev,)— Agency of The Bank of California. 
London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Roths- 
child Freres. Berlin— Direction der Disconto Gesellschaft. China, 
Japan and East Indies— Chartered Bank of India. Australia and China. 
Australia and New Zealand— The Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and 
Bank of New Zealand. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 3, 1897. 



HOME DECORATION- 

TOO much stress cannot be laid upon harmony of colors 
in furnishing. Natural wood finish is a great snare 
in this respect. People who, for the sake of economy, 
have the whole of a house furnished in one kind of wood, 
necessarily narrow the choice of colors for furnishing to 
the ones which will accord with that special wood; and 
either have a house all off one piece, or get some disagree- 
able combinations according as they consider or ignore the 
claims of the woodwork. Painted wood is much more 
easily managed. It can be painted either lighter or 
darker than the walls or a shade of the contrasting color 
may be employed. Timid furnishers desiring to avoid dis- 
pleasing combinations often err on the other side and use 
a group of tones too nearly related. Contrast is needed 
in tones and in colors for a pretty, satisfactory room. 

Wo sometimes enter rooms which seem crowded 
with only one person present; in which it would be impos- 
sible to read or work for any length of time without falling 
a prey to subtle and over-mastering irritation. Space 
and plain surface are what we need, with only enough de- 
coration to relieve, not to tire the eye. Those rooms are 
the most restful which give us harmonious combinations of 
color, accented by a plain surface somewhere — cither 
plain walls, or plain curtains, or a plain carpet. One 
should not forget that the wall is the background f jr the 
pictures and ornaments, the carpet for the rugs, and fur- 
niture are only a background for the people. We are too 
apt to forget the people in our arrangements. 

Colors have some curious individual propert'es. Yel- 
low is an advancing color; yellow rooms seem smaller than 
they are. Blue is a retreating color, but blue rooms look 
larger. Red is stationary, therefore less irritating than 
either of the other colors named. Green is nearly station- 
ary. But blue is also a cold color, and should never be 
used in a room which has only a northern outlook. There 
is an apparent fall of ten degrees of heat upon entering a 
blue room. This is why green requires sunlight to bring 
out the yellow and to make it seem cheerful. These quali- 
ties appear in all compound colors in proportion as red, 
yellow and blue at present. 

Interior curtains may be of any material or color to 
suit the character of the room or the owner's purse. 
Lace curtains should never be used except with the most 
expensive furniture, and then they require additional 
hangings of plush or brocade to give an effect of richness. 
Cheap lace should never be used at all. If the right thing 
cannot be found in the regular drapery materials, 
dress goods can often be obtained which suit exactly the 
room without there being any appreciable increase in ex- 
pense. Not infrequently the dress goods will be cheaper. 
There should, as a rule, be a contrast between the walls 
and the curtains, and the drapery should be made to em- 
phasize the color scheme. 

Long, narrow windows may be treated in two ways. 
Either the apparent height may be diminished oy a small 
casement, the pole and curtains being hung below; or the 
window may be broadened in effect by the use of a pole 
whose ends stretch out beyond ihe casement on each side 
from eight inches to a foot. Against the wall should be 
hung opaque curtains, connected by a narrow valence 
across the top, framing as it were the window, while over 
the sash the drapery must be as transparent as possible. 

$25 Rate to Chicago via the Great Santa Fe Route. 
The low rules made for Christian Kndeavorers will be open to the 
public as well, if they travel via the 1 1 real Santa Fe Route. Ticket 
Office, IM4 Market street, Chronicle Building, Tel. Main 1581, 

George T. Marsh & Co. don't cart how much Japan protests 

against Uncle 8am; they continue to import curios, art goods, tap- 

•,and rare carvings from that -trange, 'juaint land. Well 

worth a visit to see them. 625 Market street, under the Palace Hotel. 

Great Reduction in prices during toe summer months on Art Goods, 
Pictures. Crockery, Glassware, eto S. & <J. Gump, 11.1 Geary street. 

Jackson's Napa Socta lemonade is a luxury. Try it. 



TJhe jCatest TJovelty 




7/fess 

jackets 

All colors, 
regular price 

SI 2. 50 



On special 
Sale at 



£7.45 



MURPHY BUILDING, Market and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

203 to 207 N Spring St. bet. Temple and First St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



EGYPTIAN 
ENAMEL. 



An incomparable beautifler. It defies detection and 
is perfectly harmless. 

50 cents and $1.00 



GP rPCUE A celebrated French preparation. It prevents and 
• U. Ol\D/Y\L> I removes wrinkles. Si 00, Sent to any address on 
| receipt of price. Trial pot 10 cents 

FACE BLEACH. Guaranteed superior to all others, $1 ; trial bottle 15c* 
at office; 26c. by mail. I use only plain wrappers and envelopes. 

ZlirS. /Id. J- DllllCr 11*0 MARKET STREET, 

San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 

Dr. D. R. Dupuis. 

asSSrtSSX'Sr* facial treatment 

Permanently removes Wrinkles, mall-pox 
Scars, and all Facial Disfigurations 

713 POST ST, Near Jones. 



Nelson's rtmuGose. 



Unequalled for Poison Oak, Sunburn, all Irritation of the Skin, 
and for the Toilet generally. 

DR. BYRON" W. HAINES 



14 Grant Avenue 
Rooms 16-17-18-19 



Dentist 



o\rer "City of Paris.' 



DR. ARTHUR T. REGENSBURGER, 

Dentist, 

Office and Residence, 409's Post street, San Francisco 

Orfloe Hours. 9 to 12 a. m .; lto5p. M. Telephone Clay 84 

Dr. F. G. PAGUE 

Dentist 

Rooms 1 and 5, Academy ot hciences Building. 819 Market street 



July j. 1S97 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



SAN RAFAEL. 

nY DEAB SALLIE: Well, here we are, ami here we 
will remain till after the 4lh doings anyway. Is it 
t»ay '.' Gba>tly so. to borrow an expression I heard a girl 
usi-last night. No end of pretty girls and some fine young 
matrons, lots of old women, and oh, so few young men. 
Wardie McAllister is perennial, you know; so is John 
Perry Jr. Sam Boardmau comes to see his ma. and some- 
one else, if appearances are what they seem. Ed Green- 
way strives to be here, there, and everywhere, pleasing 
all; but, like the Biblical parable, "What are they among 
so many ? " The frills that some of the guests put on are 
just too funny — a sort of 'touch me not" air. Fearful, I 
suppose, that civility would entail acquaintance, and until 
Mrs. Hager takes strangers up, they are not much at- 
tended to socially. See ? 

The Hagers have one of the hotel cottages, andean keep 
on their own hunting grounds if so inclined. Actually, as 
I said to Greenway, the hotel dining-room looks like the 
cotillion folks at supper. He didn't see it, but it's true, 
all the same; so many of the same faces and the same 
gathering into little sets; almost the same flirtations. 

In the absence of other diversion, the women have gone 
in a good deal for riding, and that brings me to what I 
started to tell you of — the paper chase — which virtually 
has set the gaiety going, and from now on, for a while at 
least, there will be tennis, paper chasing, and dancing. 

What a blessing that muslins have come to stay. Or- 
gandies, dimities, and Swiss are all favorite wear, and the 
girls look so dainty and fresh in them. The Hager girls, 
the Kip sisters, and Delia Mills, go in for shirt waists more 
or less elaborate and costly, as even a percale can be made 
to be. You should have heard the chorus of welcome that 
greeted Julia Crocker as she ran up the steps the day she 
came over. Bernie Drown was over, too, but just for a 
flyer. Mrs. Ingraham Kip has friends from the city to lunch 
frequently. Some army people from Berkeley are amODg 
the latest. Card playing must be a great resource to the 
old folks, for they are at it all day and every day. The 
paper chase was a good one for a beginning, but the heat 
of the day made it trying to some of the followers of the 
hunt. A pupil of Captain Dilhan's riding class did bravely, 
but there is no use talking, Miss Warburton tops off every 
one in the saddle. She sits like one "native and to the 
manner born," as Shakespeare makes some fellow say. 
There came near being a bad accident from an upset, 
but luckily no one was hurt beyond bruises and a scare. 
The hop was greatly enjoyed by all, although the tennis 
ball is looked for with much anticipation; I will drop you 
a line about it, and the people over for it. Ross Valley 
always sends a big contingent for any gathering at the 
hotel, but does its entertaining to special guests in an ex- 
clusive style. We are hoping for some lovely evening 
frolics. There is an item of gossip among the heap float- 
ing round, that a well-known belle is engaged to an equally 
well-known beau; but of that, more later. Belle. 

Hotel Rafael, June 29, 1897. 



THAT California is not always to remain a new country 
we are reminded every now and then by the death of 
an old citizen. On last Friday E. D. Heatley, a man 
widely known in the community, passed away. He had 
been for a long time engaged in the commission business in 
San Francisco, and had passed a little more than half a 
century in active mercantile life. He was for forty years 
a member of the firm of Dixon, Da Wolf & Co., and enjoyed 
the acquaintance, confidence, and friendship of a great 
many people. His death was caused by heart disease. 



THE missing word contest started by Schilling & Co. is 
attracting a great deal of attention. They have paid 
several $100 prizes, and now announce that they will pay 
$1,000 for the missing word. Money is close in many quar- 
ters, but Schilling & Co. are treating the public in a hand- 
some and generous manner. 



Tub Press Clipping bureau, 510 Montgomery street, S. F. roods all 
papers on tbe Pad tic Coast, and supplies clippings on all topics, business 
and personal. 

Jackson's Napa Soda is a gentle aperient. 



Saved on the cost in 
buying the . . . 

Jxlaaka % 

Refrigerator I 



Per 



Cent 



5 

Per Month 



W. W. MONTAGUE & GO., | 

309 to 317 Market St., San ® 

Francisco, Cal. g 

Cor. N. First and St. John ® 

Sts., San Jose, Cal. || 



SUMMER NOVELTIES 
JUST OPENED 



121 Montgomery St., 

Opposite Occidental Hotel. 



W. H. R AMSEY, 



Merchant 
Tailor. 



Williams Brothers. 
TAILORS. 



( Successors to Thomas 8. Williams ) 

111 Sutter Street, Lick House Block 
San Francisco 




KtAKNY STREET, Near Geary. 



Best and Most Reliable 
Establishment to 

tiftVE, YOUR LYES 
EXAMINED 

and Filted to Glasses 



Seils Burial Lots 
and Graves. 
Perpetual Care, 



LAUREL HILL 

Gemeteru 
Association 



Junction of Bush 
street and 
Central avenue, 
San Francisco. 



The BROOKS=FOLLlS ELECTRIC CO. 



523 Mission St 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Importers and Jobbers of 

Tel. Main 861 



ELECTRICAL 
SUPPLIES 



cJOHN D. SULLIUAM 

Attorney-at-LaW 
Rooms 34-38, 3d Floor Chronicle Building, San Francisco. 



Josepli Gillott's Steel Pens, 



Gold Medals. Paris. 1878-1689. These pens are : " the 
best in the world." Sole agent tor the United States 
MR. Henry HOE, 91 John street, New York. 
Sold by all Stationers . 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Hale & Norcross Silver Mining Company. 

OFFICE OF TBE HALE & NORCROSS SILVER MINING COMPANY, room 11. 
ill Pine street. San Fiuneisco, June'«, 1897. „„„/. nf Directors of 

Notice is hereby given that, at a meeting ot ** ?°?^ "VVnr^ssras 
this company, held this day, the aate of delinquency oi stock for assess 
ment No. 1 1 1 was postponed until 

JULY 28, 1897. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on July 28, 
1897, will be delinquent »nd advertised for sale at fi"" 1 " a r ?°" ^ "^ 
less payment he made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, AUkUst w, 
1897. top ij said delioejuent assessment, together with the costs of ^ er 
Using and expenses o. sale. By order of the Board of Directors, 

- R. R. GRAYSON, Secretary. 



i8 



SAN IRAN'CISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 3, 1897 



THE WHEEL OF FORTUNE. 

No. III. 

WHEN the Mead House occupied the corner of Pine and 
California streets, where the Nevada Bank now 
stands, gambling was at full blast in San Francisco. 
Everybody played, and there was no stigma attached to 
the confession of an all night session at the faro table. 
There were few quarrels in those dens, possibly because it 
was generally assumed that everybody was armed, and 
that a row meant a bullet, with the odds in favor of the 
speedier man. But one quarrel did take place in the 
Mead House with fatal results. 

Jim Dobson was one of the noted desperadoes of the 
sixties. Jim was a straight, angular fellow, of middle 
height, with coal black hair plastered down on each side 
of his face. He had high cheek bones, and showed in all 
unmistakable traces of Indian blood. He had killed sev- 
eral men in the mining districts before he drifted to San 
Francisco. Jim was playing one night at the Mead House, 
and beside him, also betting on the game, was Jack Perrv, 
like Dobson a professional gambler. Jim was [losing, and 
he was half drunk, and decidedly out of temper. When 
full of liquor he was as treacherous and dangerous as a 
tiger. Some dispute arose about the ownership of a bet 
between Perry and himself, and Jim pushed his chair 
back with a murderous look. But before the quick hand 
could reach the back pocket, Perry's pistol was staring 
him in the face. 

"Another move and you are a dead man, Jim," said 
Perry, quietly. There was no excitement in the room. 
With the exception of moving out of the possible range of 
the bullets, the spectators looked silently on. 

"You've got the drop on me, Jack,'' growled Dobson, 
"Do you want this thing to go any further.'' 

"As you please." returned Jack, for there was an audi- 
ence, and both men were jealous of their reputation for 
courage. 

"Then look out for yourself," said Dobson, leaving the 
room. 

Three days afterwards, as Dobson was passing the Safe 
Deposit building, corner of California and Montgomery 
streets, Perry stepped from the doorway anc shot him. 
Dobson, as be reeled, made a futile effort to get his pistol 
out, but Perry's bullet had struck him just below the 
heart, and he fell, saying, "You gave me no show, Jack. 
You have murdered me like a dog." 

He was carried into Burnett's drug store, and laid upon 
a table, while a doctor examined him. 

" Pull off my boots, boys— don't tell my mother," were 
his last words. I.il<e ail men of his class, he did not want 
to have it said that he had died in his boots. As he died a 
woman rushed in and Hung herself upon his heart, weeping 
bitterly. "Hush," said the bystander, "it is Tim's girl! " 
She was led away by some sympathizing friends, but it 
was remarked shortly afterwards that the diamond pin 
which Dobson always wore in his shirt front had disap- 
peared. She had detached and looted it in that last 
agonized embrace. But faro was not the only game that 
was found in the Mead House. There were roulette and 
even rouge et noir tables, push, dice— private rooms for 
poker— every inducement to indulge in the devil's pastime. 
The l,ou hnmnu that existed among the regularly enlisted 
Knights of Fortuna had a fascination that drew many out- 
siders within the pale. Whether in luck or out of luck, 
they always feasted well. They smoked the best cigars 
and had credit at the tailors. Because thev were a sort 
of joint stock company, where the winners always staked 
their less fortunate brethren, not knowing but next night 
their places would be reversed, and the lender would be- 
come the borrower. It was an ideal life for a lazy man, 
an alternation from perfect idleness to intense excitement! 
Pat Robson's game on Post street was the resort of the 
smaller fry, and was particularly affected by those of the 
newspaper profession who gambled. A club of the re- 
porters and some of the printers of an evening paper was 
formed who made what is technically called in the gaming 
business " a cow." Translated, this means that all sub- 
scribed one or two dollars each, ami gave the amouut to 
one of the party to play for the common benefit. If he did 
not succeed the cow was passed to - rue one else until at 



last a fortunate player was found. One or two of the club, 
and sometimes more, would accompany the cattle men, 
but the rule was that they should offer no advice about 
the disposition of the bets. 

Robson's aame was much frequented by people from the 
country, as that worthy gambler always had a good army 
of "steerers " scattered abroad. One night a deaf and 
dumb man was playing white chips at Robson's. A com- 
passionate bystander, who stood closer to the table than 
the afflicted one, obeyed his mute signals, and moved his 
bets for him. Once he forgot a stack, and one of those 
brigands who come under the head of check guerrillas, put 
forth an eager hand and grasped it. Then ensued a 
miracle. 

" Let that go. Drop it quick I " shouted the dumb. 
" I thought you were deaf and dumb," gasped the guer- 
rilla. 

" None of your business whether I am or not," said the 
fakir, and the game went on. 



fl New 
Policy. 



The Guaranteed Cash Value Policy of 
The Equitable Society contains many 
advantages not offered heretofore by in- 
surance companies. This new policy 
provides for all the benefits of life assur- 
ance and also for li r e income and invest- 
ment to the holder at the end of a stipu- 
lated period. In event of death of the 
holder, the face value of policy is pay- 
able immediately or may be converted 
iuto an income for life. Thus, a sure 
provision may be made for protection to 
families, or estates, or incomes, to child- 
ren, or others, in addition to the invest- 
ment for the policy-holder at a later 
period of his life. 



The Equitable 
Lite flssuranGG 
Society 



of the United States is the strongest and 
best company in the world. 

ASSETS. $216,773,947. SURPLUS, $43,277,179. 
A. M. SHIELDS, Manager. EDWItf CRAMER, Cashier. 

Crocker Building, San Francisco, Gal. 



Christian Endeavor Rates 



Opeo to all via 



Chicago and tforth western 
^/railway 



To Chicago - - $25.00 
To St. Paul and Minneapolis, 26.75 
To Milwaukee - - 26.00 



San Francisco 
to Chicago, 
3^ days. 



Through Daily Pullman and Tourist sleeping Cars 
R B RITCHIE. G A. P. C No. •.' New Montgomery St,. Palace Hotel 



July 3. 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»9 



INSURANCE 

THE first and only horseless fire engine in the United 
States has just gone Into commission In Boston. It is 
a (rrcat svi. 

SC Norton, cashier of the United States Internal 
ue, who committed suicide last month (40,000 be- 
hind in his accounts, was bonded in the National Surety 
Company for 120,000. 

Insurance men have just discovered that the kinotoscope 
is a firebug in disguise, and will not insure buildings in 
which the machines are located. 

The licensed local agents in the State of Washington 
have organized. 

Dr. Geo. S. Miller. Superintendent of the Phoenix Mu- 
tual Life, who has been visiting California, left last week 
for Salt Lake City. 

J. J. McDonald, manager of the Continental Fire, is in- 
specting the company's business in this State. 

The local agents in Stockton, Sacramento, San Jose and 
Los Angeles have signed the agreement to accept 15 per 
cent, commission and abide by the rules of the Association. 

The ..Titna Indemnity Company is entering the different 
States for business. 

Insurance Commissioner Clunie has notified the different 
life companies of his intention to strictly enforce the pro- 
visions of Section 450 of the Civil Code, which have been 
generally avoided. 

Okell, Donnell & Co., have accepted the agency of the 
burglary department of the Fidelity and Casualty, the 
New England Burglary, formerly represented by this 
firm, having withdrawn from the Coast. 

The Royal Exchange, of London, Robert Dickson, man- 
ager, has entered the Western Union. 

The Assessment companies that have pulled out of the 
Compact will not resume in this city. 

GEORGE E. MORSE. 



THE appointment of George E. Morse by Judge De 
Haven to the position of Clerk of the United States 
District Court for the Northern District of California, was 
a deserved recognition of that 
gentleman's qualifications. The 
appointment was in no sense a 
political one, for Mr. Morse has 
been a business man, not a poli- 
tician. He has a great many 
friends in this city, where he has 
long resided. He has for the 
past twelve years been an em- 
ployee of the Western Sugar Re- 
finery Company. Mr. Moore is 
a Native Son. His training and 
capacity are in the direction 
of the responsible position to 
which he has been called by 
Judge De Haven. That he will 
make an efficient official of the 
George B. Morse. United States Court is guaran- 

teed by his faithful and honorable business career in this 
city. Mr. Morse took his position on July 1st. 

THE San Francisco and North Pacific Coast railway 
has issued special rates for the Fourth, and good un- 
til the 6th, for all points along that beautiful and pictur- 
esque route of California. The rates are so low that they 
are within the reach of anyone. In addition, special rate 
tickets will be sold up to and including the 5th, good for 
return until the 12th, to all the resorts reached by this 
railway. The San Francisco and North Pacific is one of 
the most popular lines in the State, as it is always doing 
something for the district of country through which it 
runs. Further particulars of their holiday rates may be 
had at the Tiburon ferry, the ticket office in the Chronicle 
building, or the MutualLife building on the corner of Cali- 
fornia and Sansome streets. 




H. M. NEWHALL & CO, 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 

309 and 3M Sansome St. • San Francisco, Ca' 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAY, DURHAM & HKODIE 43 and 48Toreadneedle St.. London 

SIMPSON, MACKIRDY & CO 29 South Castle St., Liverpool 

INSURANCE. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

Firemans Fund 

INSURANCE COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Capital, $1,000,000. 



Assets, $3,500,000. 



PALATINE 



Mothers, besure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup " lor your 
ohildren while teething. 



Drink Jackson's Napa Soda before breakfast. 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager, 439 California St., S. F. 

Fire Insurance. 

Founded A. D. 179?. 

Insurance Gompanu ot Nortn America 

OP PHILADELPHIA, PBNN. 

Paid-up Capital 13,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 5,022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 Calltornia St., S. F. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up 11,000,000 

Assets 3,300.018 

Surplus to Polloy Holders 1,668,332 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager 501 Montgomery St. 
B. J. Smith, Assistant Manager. 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 501 Montgomery St 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Established n 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON NSURANCE CO. incorporated i7»» 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, . 

413 California St., S.F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital J6,70O,O0O 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents, 

No. 316 California St., S. F 

THE THURINGIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Of ERFURT, GERMANY. 
Capital. $2,250,000 Assets, $10,984,248. 
Paclflo Coast Department : 204-208 SANSOME ST,, S. F. 

VOSS. CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 

n D D I ffl R fY Q RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the genu- 
ur\. nivunu O lne— Aspeolflc for Exhausted Vitality, Physical, 
Debility, WaBted Forces. Approved by the Aoademy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the medical oelebritles. Agents for California and the Paclflo States. 
J. G. STEELE & CO., 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Franolsco. 
Sent by mall or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED— Box of 50 pills, »1 25; of 100 pills, »2; of 200plll8, 
J350; of 400 pills, $6; Preparatory Pills (2. Send for circular. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 3, 1897. 



tfefeliSRteQj* 



WARDEN Hale, of San Quentin. has a grim sense of 
humor, but he is considered the most genial keeper 
of convicts in the country. The other day the news editor 
of the Associat rang up the Warden by long- 

distance telephone. 

"Won't you please tell us something about that hanging 
to-day?" came pleading over the wire. 

"What hanging'.'" asked Hale, in surprise. 

' That man Sears, who is to be executed to-day." ex- 
plained the editor. 

"Never heard of him," declared Hale, positively. 

"Well, we have it on our future-event book for to-day," 
persisted the news man. 

"Oh, you have, have you'.'' repeated the Warden, in a 
changed tone. "That's different! If the hanging is down 
on your book, it will have to go ahead. I don't know 
Sears, but I suppose I can sacrifice someone else, so long 
as you have it scheduled!" 

An unintelligible sentence, rapidly spoken, came back 
over the telephone. 

"But, remember," added the Warden, severely, "you 
must really be more careful in future. I can't continue to 
hang men every time the Associated Press makes a mis- 
take in its future-book! It's unreasonable, and the men 
don't like it. Get these functions scheduled accurately! 
Good-bye!" 



Almost every night James F. J. Archibald, leader of 
germans and steeplechases, and charter member of the 
San Rafael Hunt Club, crosses the bay to his Oakland 
home, and there locks himself up for the next ten hours. 
Not long ago, he prepared, as usual, to take the last 
boat, remembering, as he reached East street, that he 
had promised to meet a string of young ladies at the ferry, 
and escort them home. Archibald was early for his ap- 
pointment, so sat down on a bench to rest. The night be- 
ing warm, it was not long before Jim was fast asleep. 

He continued to slumber undisturbed until the girls ap- 
peared on the scene, and, of course, they took in the situa- 
tion at a glance. After some hesitation and several con- 
sultations, they decided to awaken the sleeping beauty, 
but Archibald has a clear conscience and is hard to arouse. 
In vain they called him, first softly, and then louder. He 
continued to snore, until one maiden, not accustomed to 
have her presence disregarded, administered a violent 
shaking. Jim's head wobbled aimlessly for a few seconds, 
and then he s'owly came back to earth. He fancied it was 
morning, and that His Man had awakened him earlier than 
he had ordered. 

, — ," he said, profanely. " ," 

he continued, without opening his eyes. 

A chorus of shocked screams completed his awakening. 
and the unhappy Archibald finally expanded his optics to 
find no valet, but a wrathful trio of girls, who persistently 
refused to hear explanations or apologies. 
* * # 

There is no excuse for a student at Stanford University 
to desist in his struggles for an education. The custom in 
that institution is. when a student in any course fails to 
keep up with the class, to transfer him to some other 
course, where the studies are less difficult and, perhaps, 
more congenial. One bright youth was sent to Palo Alto 
for the arts course by his admiring parents. After a time 
he stated, in answer to an inquiring friend, that he had re- 
linquished arts and was taking a literary course. Several 
other changes followed at intervals of a few months. Then 
one day, he was asked to give another account of his 
studies. 

'"Well," he said, "they cinched me a good deal and I am 
now taking a special course." 

"Indeed! In what line?" 

"Oh, I'm studying carpentering, blacksmithing and The 
Life and Teachings of Christ," answered the youth, 
naively. 



Apropos of the approaching Christian Endeavor Conven- 
tion, the friends of Billy Burr are obtaining some diversion 
by recalling an experience of his during the World's Fair 
at Chicago. Burr had gone East, fresh from a severe 
course of college training as an athlete, with a firm resolve 
to "turn himself loose," — a resolution to which he adhered 
conscientiously. While at the height of his hilarity in 
Jackson Park, he noticed a number of people wearing a 
rather pretty button, with the letters "C. E." The En- 
deavor Societies, which have since sprung up all over the 
country, were not so well known at that time, and Burr 
supposed the letters meant "Columbian Exposition." Ob- 
serving much esprit dt corps among the wearers, he deter- 
mined to be in it too. 

After a long search he found and bought a button in a 
store down town, and returning to the grounds, displayed 
his button at the first bar he struck, and ordered a "C. E. 
cocktail." The barkeeper, not to be disconcerted by any 
non-Chicagoan, concocted some mixture of chain lightning 
and hades, and then Burr went in search of other mem- 
bers of the new Order. He invited the next wearer of a 
C. E. button, whom he met, to have a drink, and was 
much hurt at the latter's unfraternal and discourteous re- 
fusal. This experience was repeated man}' times that day 
and Burr became so insulted that he raised a terrible row, 
during which the Christian Endeavorers denounced him as 
an imposter. Explanations followed and Burr speedily 
discarded his new decoration. 
* * * 

Rather a good story is going the rounds of the banking 
set, about a junior clerk in one of the English banks here. 
He is only seventeen and a wee bit of a chap, but everyone 
is fond of him. He is a manly youngster and considers in 
a perfectly irresistible way that he constitutes the bank 
by which he is employed. Like the Lord Chancellor in 
lolanthe: 

" It has no kind of fault nor flaw, 
" And I, my lords, embody the law." 

One of the customers of the bank is an exceedingly dis- 
agreeable Scotchman, a great, tall, surly bully, of whom 
everyone steers clear, whenever possible. The junior 
clerk was sent to collect some money from him due the 
bank. The Scotchman objected as usual, and said to come 
around some other day: he was busy; and besides, he had 
forgotten the combination of the safe. 

Drawing himself up to his greatest possible height, 
which is really a modest way of expressing it, the junior 
grew very stern and remarked, in bitiug accents: 

"Look here! That won't wash with The Bank. Now 
just give me the money, my good fellow!" 

My good fellow stared in silence for a few seconds, 
seemingly paralyzed, and then meekly surrendered the 
coin. 



In making their preparations for the local celebration of 
"icon's Jubilee, the British residents here expressed 
continual anxiety as to the weather probabilities. In 
s.iite of the multitude of fervent wishes for sunshine, the 
dreaded showers made their unseasonable appearance on 
the first day of the out-of-door jubilations, dampening the 
costumes if not the ardor of the celebrants. An English- 
man, passing through the city, had remained over a few 
days to participate in the local programme. He was in- 
clined to ascribe the down-pour to the poor quality of the 
British patriotism prevalent among his compatriots by 
the Golden Gate. But William Greer Harrison, who was 
a New Zealander before he became a Californian, silenced 
the critic with a ban mot. Harrison declared the wet 
weather demonstrated the very excess of patriotism. 

"A long rain for the longest reign," he commented, 
cleverly. 

* # * 

The home of Jonas Erlanger was brightened, about a 
week ago, by the advent of a little daughter. Jonas was a 
proud and happy man, but his rejoicings were marred by 
the character and date of some of the congratulations he 
received. For as Jonas is one of the most confirmed 
practical jokers on the street, his friends had a great 
many old scores to settle. They laid their plans with 
fiendish cunning and developed them with malignant joy. 
A few days before the notable event occurred, they in- 



July 3, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



dustriously circulated, far and near, a statement to the 
effect that Jonas was the joyful parent of twins. In vain 
Jonas protested, first, that the congratulations were pro 
mature, aud afterwards that his good fortune had not 
come in duplicate. Xo one believed his disavowals, and by 
the time the single baby really arrived, — alone,— Er- 
langer's home was filled with all scrtsof presents suitable 
for twins. Among the numerous y i f t s was a double per- 
ambulater, a bottle, with tubes for two, garments in dupli- 
cate, and even a miniature tandem bicycle, sent by some 
friend who believed "the twins would prove as smart as 
their father." 

• * # 

Severe and sarcastic though he be with attorneys whose 
lack of knowledge or of probity arouses his judicial ire, 
still Judge J. V. Coffey has his amiable lapses, and he is 
invariably both kind and cordial when the venerable 
Judge E. D. Sawyer practises before him. Though 
Sawyer's hair is white and Coffey's reputation for dignity 
is well established, these two old friends chaff each other 
like boys. The other day Judge Sawyer appeared before 
Judge Coffey to file some petition in a probate proceeding. 

"What can I do for you. Judge?" asked Coffey. 

"Well, if your Honor will just wait till I put my 
spectacles on, so I can see to read this ," 

"Tut! Tut!" interrupted Coffey, reprovingly. "What 
business has a young blade like you to wear spectacles?" 

"Well, when Your Honor is seventy-two, you will feel, 
as I do, that you have earned the right " 

"Hush! Hush! man," again interrupted the Court. 
"Don't tell it!" he added, in a stage whisper. Then put- 
ting his hand beside his mouth, he said softly: "There are 
ladies present!" 

Then Sawyer indulged in a joyous cackle, but Coffey 
never smiled. 

* * * 

They have a new story in the swagger set at San Rafael, 
about the terrible speeches children sometimes make. The 
proud mother of a youngster named Beatrice, aged seven, 
had been calling upon a lady, who may be disguised under 
the name of Mrs. Brown-Jones. The latter has recently 
brought into the world another little Brown-Jones, and as 
the caller was leaving she asked, turning to her young 
daughter: 

"Beatrice have you kissed Mrs. Brown-Jones?" 

Beatrice, who had previously been warned not to play 
with certain children, afflicted with measles, because of 
the danger of contagion, looked very unhappy for a few 
minutes and then bravely replied: 

"I should like to very much mother, but I might take the 
disease (sic), and really, mother dear, I am afraid I could 
not take care of a baby properly!" 



THERE is not in all Marin County a more ideal spot for 
a summer outing for a day or a month than Blytbe- 
dale. The hotel and the cottages of an evening present a 
beautifully picturesque appearance, with their bright 
electric lights, drooping foliage, quiet, cool recesses and 
cozy corners. In the daytime it is no less inviting, for the 
tall trees and their spreading branches roof out the sun 
and make it' a most charming spot. Add to these the 
nearness of the place to the city, the regularity of trains, 
the scenic railway at its door, and the careful manage- 
ment of Blythedale, and little indeed is left to be desired 
by those who choose the country for rest and comfort. 

Fih-de-Siecle Champagne. 
It is very rare that a brand of champagne paved its way fmore 
rapidly into favor among the cultured and ultra-fashionable than the 
Moet & Ohandon. The selection of this brand, at some of the most 
prominent gatherings held recently in this country, goes to show 
that Moet & Chandon is now the connoisseur's favorite. It was 
selected to be served at the last Patriarch's ball, the Washington 
Gridiron Club banquet, the O. H. P. Belmont party, the Bradley- 
Martin costume ball, and the New York Reform Club dinner, ten- 
dered toex-President Cleveland and his Cabinet. In San Francisco, 
Moet & Chandon was also in evidence at the Goad-Mackintosh wed- 
ding, Whittier-Weir wedding, and the C. P. Huntington banquet, 
and to judge by this year's importation of 2.G00 cases up to July 1st, 
Messrs. William Wolff & Co., agents for Moet & Chandon, White 
Seal, are bound to bring the brand to the front on the Pacific Coast. 
— Pacific Wine and Spirit Review. 

VTBEN out nights drinking : use Bromo-Kola in the morning. 




Gomel Oolono. 



The oldest and most reliable brand on the 
market. Sold only in 1-3 pound papers at 
20 cents per paper. All grocers keep it. 



@ CY1 /7% 3020-3028 Sixteenth St 

Branch— 3104 Mission 
Tel Mission 161 



I 9f. ffirace, 



JTouse and Sign ^Painting 



% Whitening and Papei Hanging, 
J Dealer in wall paper, etc. 



I Scotch WHisky 1 



Sole agents wanted In San Francisco by 
one of the largest Distillers, command- 
ing five Distilleries in Scotland. Agents 
must be abl« to influence a large Trade 
and will be well supported. Apply con- 
fidentially to "Distillers," care Street 
&Co.,30Cornhill, London, England. 







Jtc 



{Rubber, 
Cotion, 

jCinen. 



ose. 



For Water, Steam, 
Suction, Gas, Air, 
and other purposes 



1 GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY, 

B. H. PEASE. Vice-President and Manager. 

73-75 FIRST ST., 573-575-577-579 MARKET ST. 

Portland, Or. San Francisco. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 3, 1897. 



WEDDING bells still chime, and among the ceremonials 
of the present week were the marriage of Miss 
Agnes Lange and Major Lewis Smith, U. S. A., and of 
Miss Frances Miller, formerly of Hollister, and Herbert 
Younger, which latter took place at the home of the 
groom's sister, Mrs. Burns McDonald, on Scott street, on 
Wednesday evening. It was a very quiet affair; the bride 
was unattended, and the invitations were limited to the 
members of both families. 

Prominent among the weddings to come is that of Miss 
Laura Leigh Gashwiler and S. M. Shortridge, which is to 
be solemnized at the residence of the bride's mother on 
Central avenue on Monday, August 2nd. Recently an- 
nounced engagements include those of Miss Ada Sbarboro 
and Dr. Henri Sartori, and of Miss Annie Lawlor and 
Walter Wells. 

On Thursday, the J7th of June, at high noon, a very 
pretty wedding was solemnized at the home of the bride's 
sister, Mrs. J. F. Schemp, when P. Livingston Dunn, of 
Glasgow, Scotland, and Elizabeth M. Greenham were 
united in marriage in presence of their relatives. Colonel 
Ritchie L. Dunn was best man, and Miss May Greenham 
attended the bride, who is a daughter of the late Freder- 
ick Greenham, one of California's earliest settlers, and is 
a tall, handsome demi-blonde. Mr. Dunn is connected 
with the Institution of Civil Engineers in London, and the 
Institution of Engineers and Shipbuilders in Scotland, rep- 
resents British capitalists, and is also interested in the 
American Biscuit Co. He is a life member of the St. 
Andrew's Society, of which he is Vice President. Among 
the congratulatory messages read at the wedding break- 
fast, were cablegrams from England and Switzerland. 
The wedding trip included a visit to Del Monte and the 
surrounding country. 

The golden wedding celebration of Mr. and Mrs. Adolph 
Godehaux was held at their residence on Webster street 
last Sunday, the festivities continuing during the after- 
noon and evening. The decorations of the house were both 
pretty and elaborate. In the hall there was a forest of 
palms and ferns, and in the parlors foliage was used 
in combination with red blossoms; a bell of golden 
flowers hung suspended in the bay window of the front 
room, beneath which the aged couple received the con- 
gratulations of their friends. Music, both vocal and in- 
strumental, was the order of the evening entertainment, 
which, with the delicious refreshments, was greatly en- 
joyed by a large number of the friends of the Godehaux 
family. There were some very handsome presents re- 
ceived by Mr. and Mrs. Godehaux appropriate to the occa- 
sion. 

Theatre parties are almost the only form of entertain- 
ing indulged in these days, and are not confined to those 
at present in town. From San Rafael, Burlingame, Meulo 
Park, and other near by resorts, they have come, and all 
the places of amusement have had their quota this week. 
Apropos of theatres, the benefit at the California of Sister 
Cora on Thursday afternoon was a gala affair. The pro- 
gramme was good, and the many pretty girls who offi- 
ciated as ushers, candy and flower sellers added greatly 
to the attractiveness of the whole 

There will be an army of strangers here next week in 
the persons of the Christian Endeavorers and those who 
come with them, and for their amusement and entertain- 
ment varied are the devices being made. The city will ap- 
pear in gala dress, as the decorations of the Fourth of 
July will be allowed to remain, and the arch on Market 
street, in honor of the visitors, is quite an imposing struc- 
ture. If now the weather— as it has, unfortunately, a 
habit of doing— does not go back on us and appear at its 
worst, instead of its best! 



No more charming kind of an entertainment can be 
imagined for the summer than a garden party, and the 
pity of it is that on this peninsula, owing to climatic 
vagaries, one can so seldom be given with success. On 
the other side of the bay, however, these influences do not 
seem to obtain, and as a consequence garden parties are 
of frequent occurrence over there during the summer 
months. Several have already been given, and a particu- 
larly pleasant one was that arranged by Mrs. ChaWes 
Moulder, in Fruitvale last Friday, at which Miss Peck of 
Milwaukee was guest of honor. 'Another one on Thurs- 
day of this week, was given by Mrs. Fischer, of Haywards, 
for the benefit of the Haywards Free Library. 

Launch parties, dances at the Pacific Yacht Club 
House, and merry gatherings at each other's houses in 
turn serve to make life pleasant for those who are spend- 
ing the summer at Sausalito. They are a sociable lot over 
on the hillside, and most of the cottagers have friends vis- 
iting them. Miss de Ruyter, who is the guest of her sister- 
in-law, nee Leslie Van Ness, has become very popular, and 
many of the parties given are in her honor. 

There is a large crowd at the Hotel Rafael for the holi- 
days, the tennis tournament, which commenced yesterday, 
being the chief attraction, aud the tennis dance to-night 
promises to be a pretty scene. A goodly portion of soci- 
ety calls Major Warfield host at present, and the indica- 
tions are that the majority of them will do so until the 
season ends. Next Saturday the second of the paper 
chases will be the feature, and the sport promises to be as 
popular as it was last year, which is saying a good deal. 
Among late acquisitions are Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Gwin 
and their lovely daughter, Miss Maybelle Gwin. who spent 
last week at Castle Crags, and they will now remain at 
the Hotel Rafael for several weeks. 

The holiday festivities at the different resorts vary in 
character, but they will nearly all include dances to-night 
and on Monday. There will be a masquerade ball at Hotel 
Mount View to-night, and the guests have entered heartily 
into the spirit of it. Beautiful Del Monte hardly needs 
any other than the place itself, and yet nothing will be 
lacking to make the guests enjoy themselves. Mrs. de 
Santa Marina remains constant to Del Monte, where she has 
passed the summer for many a year past. Mr. and Mrs. 
II. S. Crocker, Mrs. Clinton Worden, Mrs. F. W. Zeila and 
daughters, and Mrs. Towne are among the arrivals of the 
past week. The gayeties at Castle Crags are now in full 
blast, and life at the Tavern is extremely pleasant. Col- 
onel Fred Crocker's family are now there, and among other 
visitors are Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Durbrow, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. M. Pierson, Mrs. W. F. Coleman, Mrs. A. Schilling and 
family, Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Herriu and daughters, Mr. 
and Mrs. George Page, .Mr. and Mrs. Frank Douty, Ward 
McAllister, and Ed. Greenway have been recent guests at 
the Tavern. 

Our congratulations over the anticipated arrival of Mrs. 
Oelrichs and Miss Fair were, it seems, rather premature, 
they having finally elected to spend the summer at New- 
port rather than on the Pacific Coast, and few who know 
anything of the delights of that select abiding place of the 
Atlantic shores can blame them. It is possible, however, 
that we may have the pleasure of seeing them later in the 
season for a brief visit. Mr. Oelrichs has been quite in- 
disposed at Paso Robles, but, for all that, he gave a de- 
ightful picnic to some of his friends there a few days ago. 



$1000.oo 

Schilling's Best tea is full money's worth. 

This $1,000.00 is extra. 

Buy the tea; guess the word; share the money. 



July 3, 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS CETTER. 



tnd family ore at the Pope 
House, Santa Cruz; Mrs. McKioatry and her daughters 

are at the Sea Beacfa; .Mr. and Mrs \\\ p. Hvmlintrton 
will spend the summer at the Pacific Ocean House, Mrs 
James Otis has selected the Hotel Veodome as her sum- 
mer locale, and there. too. Mrs. William Haas will pass 

the month of July. Mr. and Mrs. \V. G. Irwin are ooou- 
r one of the cottages at the Hotel Rafael. Mr. and 

Mrs. l:. IV Schwerine have chosen San Mateo as their 
summer resort, and have taken one of the cottapes of the 
Hotel Mateo for a couple of months. Mr. and Mrs. Dan 
Murphy are at Menlo Park-. Mrs. Curry and Miss Frances 
are at Wawona for the summer. Mrs. Ed Stanley and 
bQss Garber have, as usual, gone to the Napa Soda 
SpriDgs. The I. X. Walters are at Santa Barbara for the 
:. Mrs. Martin and her son Peter have been paying 
a visit to Los Angeles. Lieut, and Mrs. Bent, «»V Cohen, 
have returned from their wedding trip, and are receiving 
their friends at the Presidio. 

Lieut. Smedburg and Lieut, and Mrs. Mclvor are visit- 
ing Colonel and Mrs. Smedburg, who, accompanied by Miss 
Cora, returned from their Eastern trip ?ast week, and 
form a large family party once more. Mrs. Knowles, who 
as Miss Nina Adams will be remembered as a popular 
society belle during the 'SO decade, arrived here last week 
from her Boston home, and will pass several weeks in San 
Francisco as the guest of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. S. 
Adams. Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Everett, nee Estee, have 
returned from their honeymoon trip. Mrs. Phcebe Hearst 
is one of the arrivals of the week, and is domiciled at the 
Palace. 

Mr. and Mrs. Smith-Brown's recent house party at 
their villa in Napa Valley included Mrs. Francis Edger- 
ton, Mrs. Henry Wetberbee and W. F. Whittier. Medical 
Director and Mrs. J. V. D. Middleton will spend the month 
of July at the Presidio, prior to their departure Eastward. 

A very pleasant surprise, party was given to Prof. C. F. 
Graeber, the popular teacher of banjo and guitar, on last 
Saturday night by a number of his pupils. Refreshments, 
interspersed with music, made the occasion a most de- 
lightful one to the professor and all his impromptu guests. 

George T. Marsh, the well-known dealer in Japanese 
goods in this city, will leave for Japan on the fifth of 
August. He is making up a small party for the trip — an 
especially delightful one, by the way, under his chaperon- 
age — and can add one or two more to his company. He is 
familiar with all the points of interest in that country and 
speaks the language like a native. His party is select, 
and this opportunity peculiarly advantageous. Mr. Marsh 
may be found at his store, 625 Market street. 

Mrs. D. D. Colton, Mrs. Crit Thornton, and Miss Helen, 
arrived in New York last week, en route homewards, after 
a long absence abroad. 

Mrs. Chas. J. Simons, the Misses Simons, and Miss 
Bertha Herzog are at Ben Lomond, where they will spend 
a few weeks. 

L. A. Schwabacher is spending a ten days' vacation at 
Highland Springs. 



VICHY Springs, three miles from Ukiah, the terminal 
of the San Francisco and North Pacific Railway, is 
one of the most popular resorts in the State, with its cham- 
pagne baths and unlimited supply of "Vichy." A special 
round-trip rate of $5.00 has been made from the city 
to the Springs, good until July 12th. The accommodations 
at the Springs are first-class in every respect, and the 
comforts and conveniences of home are provided for the 
guests at moderate rates. Miss Allen, the proprietress 
of the Springs, gives personal attention to all details, and 
the Springs, under her management, is deservedly popular. 



June was a busy month for Max Abraham, the well known 
and capable society caterer. June is always the month of marriages; 
and marriage suppers, dinners, luncheons, etc., in San Francisco 
means the constant service of this master of ceremonies in the art of 
catering to cultivated tastes. 428 Geary street. 



Great Reduction in prioes during the summer months on Art Goods, 
Pictures. Crookery, Glassware, etc. S. & G. Gump, 113 Geary street. 

Jackson's Napa Soda kills malaria. 



'-.T.T.T.T.T.' 



PACIFIC 

CONGRESS 
1 SPRINGS 
i HOTEL 




Remodeled and under 
New Management .... 

Onlu two-and-a-half hours 
from San francisco. 

Six miles from Los Gatos. Ten 
miles from Santa Clara. Twolve 
miles from Sun Jose. 
For rates and printed matter address 

JOHN S, MATHESON, 

Manager, 



Santa Cruz Mountains, 

^ Santa Clara County . 



VlGlw Springs, 



Three Miles from 

UKIAH. 



Terminus of S. F. & N. P. Railway 
Mendocino County 

The only place in the United States where Vichy Water is abundant. Only 
natural electric waters. Champagne baths. The only place in the world 
of this class of waters where the bathtubs are supplied by a continuous 
flow of natural warm water direct from the springs. Accommodations 
first, class. 

Miss D. D. Alien. Prop. 



Blytliedate- 



NOW OPEN. Hotel and Cottages 



A pretty California spot on line of Mt. Tamalpais Scenic Railway. 
Carriage meets all trains at Mill Valley. Five minutes 7 drive. 



Mrs. Gregg, 



Under New 
Management 



^BLUE LAKES HOTEL, 



Only 19 miles from Ukiah. 

Finest summer resort in California. 

Good hunting, fishing, boating, and Bathing. 

Finest cuisine and best accommodations. 



(Bertha Postoffice) 
LAKE COUNTY, CAL. 

R. E. WHITEFIELD, 

Manager. 



UNITED STATES 
LAUNDRY. 



Telephone Soutn 420, 



Office. 1004 Market Street. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Lft GRANDE LAUNDRY, 



Tel. Bush 12. 



Principal Office— 23 Powell street, opp. Baldwin Hotel. 

Branch— 11 Taylor street, near Golden Gate avenue. 
Laundry— Fell streets, between Folsom and Howard. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Pacific Towel Gompanu 



No. 9 



Lick Place 



Furnishes clean Towels at the following low rates: Clean hand 
towels each week, $1 per month; 12 clean hand towels each weeks 
SI 50 per month; 4 clean roller towels each week, $1, 6 month; 
6 clean roller towels each week. $1 25 per month. 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples. Freckles, Moth 
Patches, Rash, and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on beauty, and defies de- 
tection It has stood the test of 48 years 
and is so harmless v- e taste it to be sure 
it is properly made Accept no counter- 
feit of similar name. Dr. L. A. Sayre 
said to a lady of the haut-ton (a pa- 
tient): ''As you ladies will use them, I 
recommend 'Gouraud's Cream ' as the 
least harmful of all the Skin prepara- 
tions," For sale by all Druggists and 
Fancy-Goods Dealers in the United 
States, Canadas, and Europe 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r, 

37 Great Jones St ,N.Y. 




24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 3, 1897. 



NOTES OF THE ARMY AND NAWY. 



Secretary of War Alger has announced the engagement 
of his daughter, Miss Frances Alger, to Mr. Charles B. 
Pike, son of Mr. Eugene S. Pike, an attorney anil capital- 
Chicago. 

Hear Admiral G.E.Belknap, U. S. X.. retired, has 
rented a cottage on Gibbs Avenue, Newport, R. I., for the 
season. 

Lieutenant Commander R. I!, l'ngersoll, U. S. N., arrived 
here from Honolulu last Sunday, having been detached 
from the Philadelphia and ordered home. 

General William M. Graham. U. S. A., assumed com- 
mand of the department of Texas last week. 

Brigadier-General Anson Mills, Third Cavalry, U. S. A., 
has been retired from service, on his own application, un- 
der the forty year service clause. He will, however, con- 
tinue to serve as a member of the Mexican Boundary Com- 
mission until the completion of that work. 

Captain George C. Remey, f S. X., has been promoted 
to the rank of Commodore. 

Captain C. V. Gridley, U. S. X"., will sail fromherenext 
Wednesday for Yokohama to take command of the Olym- 
pia, which is the flag-ship of the Asiatic Station. 

Captain C. S. Cotton, U. S. N. , will complete his three 
years of sea service in August, and will then be relieved 
from the command of the flagship Philadelphia, which is 
at Honolulu. He will be ordered home and given two 
months' leave of absence. His successor will be Com- 
mander X. Mayo Dyer, U. S. X., who has been in charge 
of the First Lighthouse District. He has just been ex- 
amined for promotion to the rank of Captain, and will soon 
receive his commission. He will leave here bv steamer on 
July 14th. 

Commander William H. Whiting, U. S. X., has been pro- 
moted to the rank of Captain. He is now in command of 
the Monadnock, which is at Portland, Or. 

Commander B. F. Tilley, [T. S. X., and family are at the 
Wilbour cottage, Newport, R. I. 

Lieutenant-Commander Frederick M. Symonds, U. S. N., 
has been promoted to the rank of Commander. He is in 
command of the Pinta. 

Colonel H. S. Merriam, First Infantry, U. S. A., has 
been advanced to the grade of Brigadier General. He has 
been jumped into promotion, previous to this, by five of 
his juniors in order that they might be enabled to retire 
with the rank and pay of Brigadier-General. General 
Merriam desires to remain in service until retired for age. 

Colonel Marcus P. Miller. Third Artillery. I". S. A. ."is 
expected here daily to take command of his regiment. 

Lieutenant Colonel W. A. Jones, Corps of Engineers, 
U. S. A., arrived here last Monday from St. Paul. Minn., 
and is at the Palace Hotel. 

Major Stephen W. Groesbeck, U. S. A., has been 
granted an extension of one month on his former leave of 
absence. 

Major and Mrs. John A. Darling. V . S. A., retired, are 
at Castle Crags for a month. Miss Ella Hastings and Miss 
Elizabeth Zane are with th< 

Major J. H, Calef. First Artillery, U. S. A., has left 
Key West Barracks, Fla.. on a live months' leave of ab- 
si ice, part of which he will pass in Stockton, Cal. 

Major .lames Chester, Third Artillery. U. S. A., has 
been ordered to the command of Fort Canbv, Wash., re- 
lieving Major David H. Kinzie. Third Artillery. U. S 
who will report to Brigadi I W. R. Shatter. U. 

S. A., for assignment. Major Chester was promoted to 
rank last week. 

Captain Tasker H. Bliss. U. S. A., of the Subsistence 
Department, has been appointed military attache at Ma- 
drid. 

Captain W. A. Thompson, Fourth Cavalry, 1". S. A., has 
been promoted to the rank of M. 

Lieutenant .lames H. Reeves. Fourth Cavalry, I". S. A 
and Lieutenant William M. Croftcn. First Infantry, I . S. 
-fully completed their course of study at 
the 1". S. Infantry and Cavalry school at Fort Leaven- 
worth, Kansas, and will join their proper stations b; 
tember 1st. 

Major-General James W. Forsyth. U. S. A., is makiug 
preparations to go to Washington. D. C. 



Captain J. D. C. Haskins, Third Artillery, U. S. A., who 
has been on duty at Cornell College, Mt. Vernon, Iowa, 
has been assigned to Battery A at Alcatraz Island. He 
was promoted last week. 

Lieutenant E. T. Qualtrough, U. S. N, has been de- 
tached from the Marion, now at Honolulu. The order 
states that he may come home at his own expense. 

Lieutenant Joseph S. Oyster, First Artillery. U, S. A., 
having been found incapacitated for active service, on 
account of disability incident to the service, has been re- 
tired from active service. 

Lieutenant Sydney A. Clomau, Fifteenth Infantry, 
U. S. A., has been granted six weeks' leave of absence. 

Lieutenant John R. Williams, Third Artillery, U. S. A., 
has been appointed military attache at Berne, Switzer- 
land. 

Lieutenant Delamere Skerrett, U. S. A., returned from 
the East last Saturday and is on duty with his new battery 
in the Third Artillery. He was formerly Second Lieuten- 
ant in the Fifth Artillery. 

Lieutenant Lloyd England, Third Artillery, U. S. A., 
will remain on duty at the Presidio until September 1st., 
when be will be sent to fill a vacancy in Battery I, Fifth 
Artillery. 

Lieutenant Archibald Campbell, Third Artillery, U. S. 
A., who has been on duty at Washington Barracks, D. C, 
has been assigned to Battery B., at Fort Monroe, Va. 
He was promoted to the rank of First Lieutenant last 
week. 

Lieutenant George W. Mclver, Seventh Infantry, U. S. 
A., has been granted one month's leave of absence, with 
permission to apply for an extension of one month. He ar- 
rived here last Sunday. 

Lieutenant C. H. McXeill. Fifth Artillery. U. S. A., has 
left Kev West Barracks, Fla., and joined Battery H., at 
Fort Hamilton, X. Y. 

Lieutenant Hugh J. McGrath, Fourth Cavalry, U. S. A., 
has been promoted to the rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant Everett E. Benjamin, First Infantry, U. S. 
A., is now regimental and post adjutant and recruiting 
officer at the Presidio. 

Lieutenant John D. Miley, Fifth Artillery, U. S. A., has 
been appointed acting engineer officer of the Department 
of California. 

Ensign B. W. Wells, U. S. X., has been detached from 
the Thetis and ordered to the Concord. 

The order requiring Chaplain T. A. Gill, U. S. X., to 
report at Mare Island has been revoked. 

Hereafter appointments to the Civil Engineer Corps of 
the Navy will only be made as the result of competitive ex- 
aminations, which will be both physical and mental. 

The cruiser Charleston has left the dry dock and the 
Bennington has taken her place there. The latter is be- 
ing prepared for a cruise to San Diego where she will 
drill the Xaval Reserves during the first week in August 
and give tbem an idea of real life on the ocean wave. 

Early in July the Boston will leave the Asiatic Station 
and come to Mare Is'and for repairs. It is said that her 
boilers are worn out and require renewal. 

The Monterey and the Monadnock arrived at Astoria, 
Or., last Sunday and on Monday a committee of prominent 
citizens called to welcome the officers to Astoria and the 
Columbia River. 

The gun-boat Concord has gone to Puget Sound and will 
participate in the Fourth of July festivities there. 

The Mohican, which has been undergoing repairs at 
Mure Island during the past two years, will be ready for 
sea service late in the summer. She will probably be sent 
to Honolulu to relieve the Marion. 

The Adams, which has arrived at Port Angeles from 
Honolulu, will leave for Seattle on July 8tb. and is ex- 
pected here July 19th. 

Major Lewis Smith, Third Artillery. U. S. A., was 
married hist Wednesday afternoon to Miss Agnes Ruth 
Lange. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lange, at their 
residence near the Presidio. Captain Joseph M. Califf, 
Third Artillery, U, S. A., acted as best man. The newly 
wedded couple left in the evening for Washington Barracks, 
D. C. , where he is stationed. 

Lieutenant James W. Hinkley. Third Artillery, V. S. A., 
now at St. Barrancas. Fla.. will leave there September 
1st for dutv with Light Battery C at the Presidio. 



July 3. 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



25 



By I^ail, Boat ar?d Sta^e. 



Southern Pacific Co. --Pacific System. San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 



Train* L«arc *nd are Due to Arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 



|M 



/>..r« /«/f i. 1»7. 



I Arrir* 



Sao Jorc, and war Muttons 

Atlantic Express, Ogden and East 9:46p 

Hcnlcla. Sacramento. Orovlllo, and Redding, via Davis 5 U 1- 

VacaTllie and Rum^cy - l&p 

Martinez. San Ramon. Vallejo, Napa. Calistoga, Santa Rosa o.m p 
SUes, San Jose, Stockton. lone, Sacramento, Murvsvllle, 

Cblco. Tebama. and Red Bluff 4:I6P 

Peters. MlttOD. and Oakdn1<- *7:15P 

New Orleans Express. Merced. Fresno, Bakersfleld, Santa 
Barbara, Los Angeles, Dealing. El Paso. New Orleans, and 

But 6:15p 

9:00a Vallejo 18:15 P 

Niles, San Jose Llvermore, and Stockton 7:15P 

•1 :00 p Sacramento River steamers *9:0OP 

1 :00 P Niles. San Jose, and Livermore 8:45 A 

1:30 p Martinez and Way Stations 7:45p 

4:00 p Martinez, Sac Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Callstoga, El Verano 

and Santa Rosa 9:16 a 

4:00 p Benlcla. Winttrs Woodland, Knight's Landing, Marys- 

ville. Orovllle. and Sacramento 10:15a 

4 30 p Latbrop. Stockton. Modesto, Merced, Raymond (for Yosem- 

Ite) and Fresno, going via Niles, returning via Martinez.. 12:15 p 
5:00p Los Angeles Express, Tracy. Fresno, Mojave (for Rauds- 

burg), santa Barbara, and Los Angeles 7.45A 

5:00p Santa Fe Route. Atlantic Express, for Mojave and East 8:15p 

6:uu p European mail, Ogden and East 10:15 A 

6:00 P Hay wards, Niles and San Jose 7:45 a 

18 :00p Vallejo t7:45P 

8:00 p Oregon Express, Sacramento, Marys ville, Redding, Port- 
land. Puget Sound and East 7:45 a 

Saw Lbandro and Haywards Local. (Foot of Market St.) 



MOO Al 


MELROSE, 


[ 7:15 A 


8:U0a 


Seminary Pabk, 


'9:45 A 


9:00 a 


FITCBB0RG, 


10:45 A 


Kki.J A 


ELMBORST. 


11:45 A 


f 1 1 .1 >1 A 


San Leandro. 


12:45 P 


112:00 H 


Pouth San Leandro, 


(1:45 P 


2:00 P 


ESTUDILLO, 


J2:45 P 


t3:00 p 


Lorenzo, 


4:45 P 


4:00 p 


Cherry, 


(5:45 P 


5:00 p 


and 


6:15 P 


5:30 p 


Haywahds. 


7:45 P 


7:00 P 




8:45 P 


8:00 P 


i Runs through to Niles. 


9:45 P 


9:00 P 


t From Niles 


10:50 P 


ttll:15 P 




Lt+12:00 p 



Santa Cbtjz Division (Narrow Gauge). (F oot of Market St .) 

J7:45 A Santa Cruz Excursion, Santa Cruz & principal way stations +.8:05 p 

8:15 A Newark, Centerville, San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 5 :50 p 

•2:15 p Newark, Centervllle, San Jose. New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations *10:5Ua 

4 :15 p San Jose and Glenwood 9 :2 ) > 

1(4:15 p Felton and Sanra Cruz §9;20A 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street rSlip 8).— *7:15, 9:00, and 
11:00 a. m .ti:ou. *SS:00, 18:00. *4:00,J5:00 and *6:00p. m. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— *6:00,8:00, 10:00 A. M.; J12;00, *1:00, 
J2:00,*3:00,X4:00 *5:00p. m. 

Coast Division (Third and Townsend streets). 



*7:00a 
17:30 A 



10:40 A 

11:30 a 



♦3:30 p 
•4:30 P 



San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesdays only) 1 :30 p 
Sunday excursion for San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, 

and principal way stations t8;35 P 

San Jose, Tres Pinos. Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Paso Robles 

SaD Luis Obispo, Guadalupe, Surf and prlncipalway stations 4:15 p 

San Jose and way stations 9:45 A 

Palo Alto and way stations 5:«5p 

San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Santa Clara, San Jose, 
Gllroy, Hollister, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, Pacific 

Grove .... *10:30A 

San Jose, Santi Cruz, Pacific Grove and way stations *7:3UP 

SanJoseand Way Stations *8:05A 

San Jose and principal way stations *8:45A 

6 :30p San Jose and way stations.. 6:35 a 

tll:45p San Jose and way stations J7:30 P 

A for Morning, p for Atternoon. *3undays excepted. tSaturdays only. 

JSundays only. tt Monday, Thursday, and Saturday nights only. 

^Saturdays and Sundays. ^Sundays and Mondays. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other Information. 

Tho r*\><*x\i\ Do/Mfi/* 306 Stockton St. San Francisco. 
I lit) UldllU rdblllO, MRS. ELLA CORBETT. Proprietress 
Furnished rooms by the day. week, or month Telephone: Grant. *u7. 



SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tibckun Kbhht- Foot of Market Struct. 
WEEK DAYS-7:3u. V:UU, 11 UU a m; 12:35, 3:5U 6:10, 6:30 P M. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11:30 p m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :50 and 11 :nu P M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00,9:.'*). II :!Xi a m; 1:30 8:31). 6:00. 6:20 P M. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN Ft ANCISC0, 
WEEK DAYS— 0:1O,7:fiO.B:9ii. 11:10 AM; 12:45, 3:40, 5:10 P M. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1:5* and 6:86 P M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40. 11:10 am; 1:40,3:40.5:00.6:25 P M. 

Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave S. F. 


In Eflecl Jum- 13, 1897 


ARRIVE INS. F. 


Week Days. 


Sundays. 


Destination. 


Sundays 

10:40 AH 
6:10pm 
7:35 pm 


Week Days 


7:30 AM 
3:30 PM 
5:10PM 


8:00am 
9:30 am 
5:00pm 


Novato, 
Petaluma, 
SaDta Rosa. 


8:40 AH 
10:25 A H 
6 :22 p H 


7:30 am 
3:30 pm 


8:00 AH 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyservllle. Cloverdale 


7:35PM 


10:25 A M 
6:22 p m 


7:30 am 
3 :3U PM 


8:00 ah 


Hopland, Uldab 


7:85 PM 


10:25 A M 
6:22 p M 


7:30AM 

3:30pm 


8:00am 


Guerneville. 


7:35PM 


10:25 A M 
6:22 P M 


7:30 AM 
5:10pm 


8:00AM 
5:00 pm 


Sonoma, 
Glen Ellen. 


10 :40 AM 
6:10pm 


8:40 A M 
6:22 p u 


7:30am 
3:30 pm 


8:O0ah 
5:00 pm 


Sebastopol. 


10:40 am I 
7 :35 P H | 


10:25 A M 

6:22 P M 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs; at Geyservllle 
for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for High- 
land Springs, Kelsey ville, Soda Bay, Lakeport, and Bartlett Springs; at 
Ukiah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Laurel Del 
Lake, Upper Lake, Porno, Potter Valley, John Day's, Riverside, Lier- 
ley's, Bucknell's Sashedoin Heights, Hullville, Booneville, Orr's Hot 
Springs, Mendocino City, Ft. Bragg, Westport, Usal. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 

TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 
A. W. FOSTER, Pres. & Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass . Agent. 

Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 

Steamers leave Broadway Wharf, San Francisco for ports in Alaska, 
9 a. M., July 5, 10, 15, 20, 2a, 30 and every &th day thereafter. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports, 9 a. m.. July 5, 10, 15, 
20, 25, 3), and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), Steamer "Pomona," at 2 P.M. July 5, 9, 
13, 17. 21, 26, 30 ; Aug. 3, 7. 11, 16. 20, 24, 23; Sept. 1, 6, 10, 14, 18, 22, 27. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, at 9 a. m. ; July 1, 5, 9, 13, 
17. 21, 25, 29, and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford Santa Barbara, Port Los 
Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles) and Newport, 11 A. m., July 3, 7, 11. 15, 
19, 23 27, 31 and every fourth day thereafter. 

For Ensenada, Magdalena Bay. San Jose del Cabo, Mazatlan, Altata. La 
Paz. Santa Rosalia, and Guaymas (Mexico), steamer "Orizaba," 10 a. m., 
the 2d of each month. 

The company reserves the right to change, without previous notice, 
steamers, sailing dates, and hours of sailing. 

Ticket Office— Palaoe Hotel, No. 4 New Montgomery street. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 10 Market st, S. F. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 P M., for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, 

calling at Kobe (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at 

Hongkong with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on 

day of sailing. 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Wednesday, July 7. 1897 

Doric (via Honolulu) Tuesday, July 27, 1897 

Bblgic Saturday, August 14, 1897 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, September 2, 1897 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates, 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street, 
corner First. D. D. STUBBS. Secretary. 

S "Australia", for Honolulu only, Tuesday, 
July 13th. at 2 p m. 

S. S. "Moana." Thursday, July 22d, at 2 P M 
Line to Coolgardle, Australia, and Capetown, 
South Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO., 
Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight office, 327 
Market St.. San Francisco. 




OipiHJ- 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 
Estate of JOSEPH HOCH, Deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, A. C. Freese, administrator 
of the estate of Joseph Hoch, deceased, to the Creditors of, and all 
persons having claims against the said deceased, to exhibit them with the 
necessary vouchers, within ten months after the first publication of this 
notice, to the said A. C. Freese, administrator of said estate, at his office, 
room No. 35, third floor Chronicle Building, corner Geary and Kear&y Sts., 
San Francisco, Cal., the same being his place for the transaction of the 
business of the said estate in the City and County of San Francisco, State 
of California. A. C. FREESE, 

Administrator of the Estate of Joseph Hoch, deceased. 

Dated at San Francisco, June 9, 1897. 

J. D. SULLIVAN, Attorney for Administrator. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 

Estate of JAMES S. BEN NET, Deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, A. C Freese. Administrator 
of the estate of James S BeDnet, deceased, to the creditors of, and all per- 
sons having claims against the said deceased, to exhibit them, with the 
necessary vouchers, within four months after the first publication of this 
notice, to the said Administrator, at room 35, Chronicle building, corner 
Geary and Kearny streets, San Francisco, Cal., the same being his place 
for the transaction of the business of the said estate in the City and 
County of San Francisco, State of California. 

A. C. FREESE, Administrator of the Estateof James S. Bennet, Deceased. 
J. D. Sullivan. Attorney for the Administrator. 
Dated at San Francisco, July 2, 1897. 



26 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 3, 1897. 



THE CANAL OF JOSEPH. 

HOW many of the engineering works of the nineteenth 
century will there be in existence in the year 60007 
\\ r.v few, we fear, and still less those that will continue in 
that far-off age to serve a useful purpose. Yet there is, 
at least, one great undertaking conceived and executed 
by an engineer which during the space of four thousand 
years has never ceased its office, on which the life of a fer- 
tile province absolutely depends to-day. We refer to the 
Bahr Joussuf — the canal of Joseph — built, according to 
tradition, by the son of Jacob, and which constitutes not 
the least of the many blessings he conferred on Egypt dur- 
ing the years of his prosperous rule. This canal took its 
rise from the Nile at Asuit, and ran almost parallel with 
it for nearly two hundred and fifty miles, creeping along 
under the western cliffs of the Nile valley, with many a 
bend and winding, until at length it gained an eminence, 
as compared with the river bed, which enabled it to turn 
westward through a narrow pass and enter a district 
which was otherwise shut off from the fertilizing floods on 
which all vegetation in Egypt depends. The northern end 
stood seventeen feet above low Nile, while at the southern 
end it was at an equal elevation with the river. Thougli 
this cut ran a perennial stream, says Engineering, which 
watered a province named the Fayoum, endowing it with 
fertility and supporting a large population. In the time 
of the annual flood a great part of the canal was under 
water, and then the river's current would rush in a more 
direct course into the pass, carrying wiih it the rich silt 
which takes the place of manure and keeps the soil in a 
constant state of productiveness. All this, with the ex- 
ception of the tradition that Joseph built it, can be veri- 
fied to-day, and it is not mere supposition or rumor. Un- 
til eight years ago it was firmly believed that the design 
has always been limited to an irrigation scheme, larger, 
no doubt, than that now in operation, as shown by the 
traces of abandoned canals, and by the slow aggregation 
of waste water which had accumulated in the Birket el 
Querum, but still essentially the same in character. Many 
accounts have been written by Greek and Roman historians, 
such as Herodotus, Strabo, Mutianus and Pliny, and re- 
peated in monkish legends, or portrayed in the maps of 
the middle ages, which agreed with the folk loreof the dis- 
trict. These tales explained that the canal dug by the 
ancient Israelite served to carry the surplus waters of the 
Nile into an extensive lake lying south of the Fayoum, and 
so large that it not only modified the climate, tempering 
the arid winds of the desert and converting them into the 
balmy airs which nourished the vines and the olives into a 
fullness and fragrance unknown in any part of the country, 
but also added to the food supply of the land such immense 
quantities of fish that the royal" prerogative of the righl 
of piscary at the great weir was valued at 
annually. This lake was said to be ISO miles round, and 
to be navigated by a fleet of vessels, and the whole circum- 
ference was the scene of industry and prosperity. 

« GENEALOGICAL table in Whitaker's "Titled Per- 
sons" recalls the fact that, though George II. was the 
father of seven children, his son Frederick, Prince of 
Wales, of six children, George III. of twice as many, the 
Royal line was, on the death of Princess Charlotte in 1817, 
in danger of extinction, and it was not till 1819 that the 
marriages of three of George IV. 's brothers made the suc- 
cession safe. Now 1 1, lantsof her Majesty may be 
reckoned at over 70. Some few of them are dead and some 
of them are cut oil From succession, but there seems little 
chance of the dynast; failing to provide an heir to the 
Throne. A list of paternal and maternal cousins of her 
Majesty brings the number of her relatives up to 234. 

OX Sunday the Letter Carriers will give their annual 
picnic at Scbuetzen Park, San Rafael, the proceeds to 
be devoted to the entertainment of the visiting del 
to the annual convention of the Letter Carriers. Valuable 
prizes will be distributed. Admission, seventy-five cents 
for adults and twenty five cents for children. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

Overman Silver Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Overman Silver 
Mining Company will be bold at tne ofVce of the company, No. 414 Cali- 
fornia street, San Francisco, Cal , on 

THURSDAY, TBI 8Tn DAY OF JULY, 1897. 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Direc- 
tors to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness us may come before the meeting. Transfer books will be closed on 
Tuesday, July o, IKiT. at 1 o'clock P .\i 

GEORGE D. EDWARDS, Secretary. 
Office — 114 California street. San Francisco. Cal. 
San Francisco, June 23, IS 1 .'" 

ANNUAL MEETING 

Best & Belcher Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Best & Bel- 
cher Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, room 33, 
Nevada Block, 30W Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal ., on 

MONDAY, the 12th DAY OF JULY. 1897, 
at the hour of I o'clock p. M., for the election of a Board of Directors to 
serve for the ensuing year and the transaction of such other business as 
may come before the meeting. Transfer books will be closed for two 
days prior to the dav of election M. JAFFE, Secretary. 

Office: Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St , San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Savage Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Savage Mining 

Company will be held at the office of the company. Room 50, Nevada Block, 

309 Montgomery street. San Francisco, Cal., on 

THURSDAY, Hie 15th DAY OF JULY, 1897. 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. M . for the purpose of electing a Board of Trus- 
tees, to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness as may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on 
Monday, July lath, at 3 o'clock p. M. 

E B HOLMES, Secretary. 
Office: Room 50, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 
Office of meHiberaia Savings and Loan Society, corner Market. McAllis- 
ter, and Jones streets, San Francisco, .Icne Stf, 1*97. At a regular meeting 
of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this day, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of four (4) per cent, per annum on all deposits for the 
six mouths ending June 30, 1897, free from all taxes, and payable on and 
after July 1, 1897. ROBERT J. TOBIN. Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending June 30. 1897, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four and one-nun (4 1-5) per cent per annum on Term De- 
posits, and three and one-half (3H) per cent per annum on Ordinary De- 
posits, free of taxes, payable on and after Thursday, July l, 1H97. Divi- 
dends not called lor are added to and bear the same rate of dividend as 
the principal from and after July 1, 1897. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office: 101 Montgomery street, cor. Sutter, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Continental Building and Loan Association. 
For the year ending with the 30th of June. 1897. a dividend has been de- 
clared of o per cent per annum on ordinary deposits, 7per cent on term de- 
posits, and 12 per cert on installment stock, all free of taxes. 
DR ED. E. HILL. President 

CAPTAIN OLIVER ELDRIDQE. Vice-President. 
WM. CORBIN, Secretary and Gemral Manager. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending with June 30, 1897, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four (4) per cent, per annum on term deposits, and three and 
one-third (3'j) per cent per annum on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Thursday, July 1,1 

Office— 33 Post street. San Francisco. Cal. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 



Finr stationery, steel and copperplate engraving. Cooper & Co., 746 
Market street. San Francisco. 



When playing poker drink Jack n's Napa Soda. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending with June 30, 1897, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate Of tour and twenty hundredth H r cent per an- 
num on Term Deposits, and three and fifty hundredths (3 5'J-lotl) per 
cent p--r annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after 
Thursday. July 1, 18H7. GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

Offiv- rnlfl si reel 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
San Francisco Gas and Electric Co. 
A dividend of tifty cents (50o] per share upon the paid upcapital stock of 
upany has been declared this day, payable July 1,1897. Transfer 
Pools will remain closed from June 22<l to July 1st, inclusive. 

WM. G BARRETT, Secretary. 
Office: 415 Post street. San Francisco, Cal. 
San Francisco June 23. Is97. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
San Francisco Savings Union 

For the half year ending June 3 i nd has been declared at the 

rate per annum of four and two-tenths 14 2j per cent, on term deposits and 
three and five-tenths (8 5) percent, on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after 'I hursday, July I, 1897. 

Office— 532 California street, cor. Webb LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Security Savings Bank. 

Dividends on Term Deposits at the rate of tour (4) per ceut per annum. 

Ordinary Deposits at the rate of tbreeand one-third (:p,) percent 

peraniin axes, for the half year ending Juue :ti), ISO? will be 

payable on and after July 1, 1897. 

S L. ABBOT JR.. Secretary. 
Office: 222 Montgomery street, Mills Building. San Francisco 



With S F. Ne*i Letter, 



July 10, 1897. 





First Gallery Rotunda. 



Dome of Grand Staircase. 





Looking up the Grand Stairway. 
FBANK T. SHEA, Architect. 



Leading in to the Main Corridor. 

THE NEW GITY HALL ROTUNDA. 



Taber Photo 



Price per Co/>y. 10 Cents. 



Annual Siibstri/lion, $4.00 




«AN rRANCl* Cft 







Vol. L V. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 10, 1897. 



Number 2. 



Printed and fubtukeaerery Saturday by ike proprietor, FRFI) MARRWil 
&H Kearny street, nan Francisco. Sntered at San Francisco Post- 
ojtcs at Second-class Mattir. 

Tke office of thi XKHS LKTTSR in Mm York City is at Temple Court; 
and at Ckuago. »u3 Boyce Building. {Frank B Morrison. Kastern 
Rcpresenlatite), where information maybe obtained regarding subscrip- 
tion and advertising rates. 

THE Bible declares, "where sin abounds, there shall 
grace much more abound.'' This week San Fran- 
cisco entertains William Jennings Bryan and twenty 
thousand Christian Endeavorers. The reader can brush 
up his politics and piety, and draw his own conclusions. 

DEBS, the anarchist, now says that he hopes to bring 
out to some Western State but 10,000 followers. He 
set out with 100,000 in his mind. He will be glad finally 
to face the setting sun with one thousand deluded adher- 
ents. And one thousand would be enough; for the jail 
accommodations of the West are somewhatlimited. 



THE statement made frequently that the Supervisors 
are not attending to the business of the city, was very 
satisfactorily disproved last Tuesday. The honorable 
Board spent two hours quarreling over the appointment 
of a handful of clerks and the expenditure of $600. Credit 
jhould be freely extended where it is due; ingratitude is 
the blackest crime ou the calendar. 



THE inmates of the Whittier Reform School have broken 
out in wild revolt against their keepers. There has 
been a good deal of scandal growing out of the manage- 
ment of this institution, which evidently does not reform. 
If much more of an unfavorable character is heard from 
the Whittier School, we shall reach the conclusion that its 
managers would shine more brightly as inmates than 
officers. 

THE sensational reports reaching the United States 
from Honolulu and Japan, in which it is declared that 
the Japanese will absorb the Islands if this country does 
not, and that their war vessels will appear off Honolulu, 
and blow President Dole and his Cabinet into the great 
crater if they do not apologize, is just about as true as 
the average fake. These baseless reports are sent out to 
influence public opinion in the United States, and nothing 
else. 

THE attention of the Odorous Society for the Preven- 
tion of Vice is called to the fact that one Stacey, 
hailing from Topeka, Kansas, having chased his erring 
wife to these shores, found her in company with another 
man. That the male half of the guilty pair was not an 
Englishman, and was not for private purposes made the es- 
pecial object of Secretary Kane's virtuous indignation, 
may have much to do with his immunity from the conse- 
quences of his crime. 

THE dilatory tactics being pursued by the contractors 
on the ferry building have aroused the especial wrath 
of Commissioner Chadbourne, and he declares that he is 
"going to camp right on the ground" until the building is 
completed, which must be not later than December next. 
The money for this work is rusting in the vaults at Sacra- 
mento, hundreds of workmen are idle in San Francisco, 
and the people are anxious to 
accomplished fact. The average 
works in this city is usually 
political pull and constitutional 

takes his time, and frequently everything else in sight. 
Chadbourne is a small man, but he has a big contract 



see the ferry depot an 
contractor on public 

a cross between the 
procrastination. He 



DR. JORDAN has gone to Alaska to brand the seals, 
and our English friends in Victoria are vigorously 
kicking. The learned President of Stanford wTll in ail 
probability find that the seals will take greater offense than 
the English, and that their remonstrance will be more 
effective. No self-respecting seal, having been branded 
upon one side, will turn the other. He will go where 
learned professors and branding irons are unknown. 



JUDGE Murphy, retained to prosecute Theodore Figel, 
has been investigating the efforts the detectives and 
police have made to discover evidence in this case, and has 
reached the conclusion that they are trying to fix the mur- 
der on some one else. The Judge is late. That fact was 
common property in San Francisco four weeks ago. De- 
tectives who do not detect are in familiar evidence in the 
criminal records of this city; particularly when they have 
been given a direct tip from their superiors. 

pj- ASTERN dispatches tell us that a hot wave is pros- 
!_/ trating thousands, killing scores, and paralyzing 
business east of the Mississippi river. Our Endeavorer 
friends are respectfully requested to compare the delight- 
ful nights, cool days, quiet mornings and breezy evenings 
of San Francisco with the prolonged sizzle back home. 
And this weather is not manufactured to order for com- 
pany — it is the regular, straight bill of fare on this penin- 
sula, and there never is any shortage in the crop. 



MAYOR Phelan has returned to the city, the startled 
chrks about the various municipal offices may lunch 
at leisure, and the heads of departments enjoy at least a 
temporary sense of security. Acting Mayor Rottanzi is 
now a plain ordinary Supervisor — shorn of his power to 
unearth ancient history, draw up reports and amuse the 
public. The zealous Doctor doubtless thought that the 
Augean stable should be cleaned, and essayed the task 
with his scalpel. But Supervisor Rottanzi should not be 
dismayed. He was a mournful failure as a Mayor, but a 
hilarious success as a joke. 



CITIZENS who contributed $34,000 to help the poor 
and build a boulevard, have a right to expect that the 
city will now add enough to their charitable donations to 
protect and make a permanent part of our system of 
roads that which their generosity created. All the work 
promised by the committee, in order to obtain deeds of 
right of way, should be at once completed. It would be 
too much to expect that the city in extending the boule- 
vard, would proceed in a direct, economical manner: but if 
the pull and the push will divide with the taxpayers there 
will be no complaint. Only let the work be done promptly, 
as Mayor Phelan very properly recommended. 

MAJOR Jansen, brigade inspector of the second 
brigade, N. G. C, has just published his report of an 
inspection held last May, and he roasts several of the com- 
panies. He intimates that they are careless, the officers 
in many instances so inefficient as to excite little respect 
in the men; that the esprit de corp, so necessary to the 
snap and life of the militia, is dead and buried; and far 
more serious than wasted property, rusty equipments, and 
general neglect is the charge that frequently the men ap- 
pear at muster in russet shoes. The N. G. C. costs a large 
sum of money, and the report of Major Jansen will not be 
calculated to create confidence in their efficiency, even in 
these piping times of peace. We can endure tin soldiers; 
but warriors appearing in russet shoes — never. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 10, 1897. 



THE COMING OF THE ENDEAVORERS. 

THIS curiously constituted city of ours probably never 
had so many good men and women in it as it has to- 
day. The coming of some twenty thousand, or more, 
Christian Endeavorers, from all over the Union, but 
mainly from New England, in parts of which remnants of 
the blue laws are still on the statute books, aroused our 
pride of hospitality, and induced our open hearted people 
to give them what, in the parlance of the West, we are 
pleased to call "a royal good time." They doubtless will 
carry with them, when they depart for their homes, many 
pleasant recollections of their visit to the Queen City of 
the Pacific, and we trust that they may have the satisfac- 
tion of leaving behind not a little spiritual food for a city 
not too full of spiritual life. That is the chief end and aim 
of their visit. Few, if any, of our contemporaries, have 
taken that view of their coming, however. All along the 
line of journalism the talk has been about the money they 
would leave behind, and that on their return back East 
they would prove excellent agents in the promotion of 
emigration to California. We would be glad to believe 
that they fulfill our expectations in both respects, but 
fear they will not. Christian Endeavorers are not spend- 
thrifts, and most of them are guests at the homes of mem- 
bers of the churches. Their outgoings will be mere 
trifles compared with the expenditures of the Knights 
Templar, Grand Army, and other large conventions. As 
to their use in the emigration business, we think that if 
our sensational dailies, which are devoted mainly to detail- 
ing the works of the devil, had suspended publication for 
a week or more, there would have been more chance for 
their immigration scheme. The difference between the 
Eastern States from which these wide awake and observ- 
ant people come, and our own, is apparent to them with- 
out colored suggestions and interlineations. More par- 
ticularly is this true when matters of real importance and 
consequence give place to the inaccurate, the sensational, 
and the meretricious in the daily press. 

Christian Endeavorers, let it be remembered, think 
more of the spiritual welfare than of the material progress 
of the people they try to influence. We despise hypocrisy 
and sham. One of our morning contemporaries actually 
suggested that in order to better impress our visitors, 
every kind of business should be suspended on the Sundays 
during their stay. Pshaw! What is that but downright 
hypocrisy? California has been built and stands upon 
very different ideas. The voters of the State have been 
appealed to more than once, but have always declined to 
adopt laws constituting Sunday a different day from any 
other. Let the truth be told. Our sa'oons are open all 
day on Sunday and no doubt there is more drinking on 
that day of the week than on others. Our Chinatown is 
what it is, and that is something unspeakable, indescrib- 
able and beyond conception by even many of our own peo- 
ple. It pays for police protection, and wields power 
paramount over the administration of law. In regard to 
this, the gravest of our local shames, we have a word to 
say with our visitors, and especially with those from New 
England. They would not like to be charged with being 
mainly responsible for this blot amongst us but, all the 
same, the charge would be true. They early championed 
the cause of the Heathen Chinee, and for years prevented 
our getting needed relief. Even to-day the well meaning, 
but mistaken Endeavorers of New England are finding 
most of the money that sustains the Missions in Chinatown. 
They do not know that they are getting value for their 
money. In very truth they are not. It would be far 
better thrown into the depths of the ocean. The Mission- 
aries may claim converions among the Chinese, but they 
cannot put their fingers on any progress they have made. 
On the other hand, the downfall of white women connected 
with missionary work can be pointed to with unerring 
certainty. Whilst here the Endeavorers should look into 
this matter, and seek their information where it may be 
found and not hidden. We trust also that they will not 
be afraid to tell San Francisco her faults. They are here 
presumably, to leave us spiritually better for their visit, 
but words of praise and compliment not deserved, will ac- 
complish but little. Let us have some downright, honest 
talk, and may they and all of us long have cause to rejoice 
over the fruitful results of their visit. 



A Bit of The Society of Christian Endeavor was organ- 
History, ized by Rev. Francis E. Clark, at Portland, 
Maine, in the winter of 1880 and 1881. The 
idea originated in the active co-operation of the young 
people in his church, who, under a pledge similar to that 
one which now binds together more than tno and a half 
million people, were doing valuable Christian work. On 
the evening of February 2, 1881, the first Young People's 
Society of Christian Endeavor was formed by Rev. Clarke 
in his study, and the pledge signed. In October, 1881, the 
second society was formed by Rev. C. P. Mills, at New- 
beryport, Mass., and by the end of the year a society was 
formed in .Maine, Vermont, Rhode Island, and Ohio. The 
first convention was held, and a year later, on June 7, 
the second convention assembled in Portland, Maine, 
at which fifty-three societies were represented. 

From that time forward the Society of Christian En- 
deavor has grown more rapidly than aay other organization 
of which religious history has a record. The great central 
idea is "to promote an earnest Christian life ameng its 
members, to increase their mutual acquaintance, at_d to 
make them more useful in the service of God." 

The Endeavorers are divided into three classes — active, 
associate, and honorary. The first class are Christians; 
the second, those of good moral claracter, in sympathy 
with religious belief while not actually professing it: the 
third are those who are comparatively aged Lut who take 
a vital interest in the order. 

As will be seen the society is primarily religious and 
social, and places no restrictions upon membership be- 
yond a belief in the broad principles of Christianity and an 
earnest desire to do good. 

The Society of Christian Endeavor, which began sixteen 
years ago, with half a hundred members in Maine, now 
has members in every civilized land excepting Russia, aud 
will soon invade the territory of the Czar; and its member- 
ship is today 2,816,620, and growing at a rate which will, 
in a few years, number more than ten millions of active 
earnest Christians, wielding a mighty influence for good. 
Its growth has been amazing, and its future gives promise 
of a vast and uplifting conquest of the nations. 

A Lesson From The News Letter has always main- 
our tained that Hawaii as a distant sea girt 
Opponents. outpost, which we must protect at all 
hazard, would be a danger to ourselves 
rather than to our enemies. The Japan Herald sends 
greeting and furnishes us with a cheeky lesson that is 
worth studying, for all that. It says "the Japanese popu- 
lation now in Hawaii is about 25,000, of whom some 18,000 
are practically soldiers who have been through their con- 
script term in the army. To send over the transport 
ships with the necessary arms would be the easiest thing 
possible. With Japan's large fleet of merchant ships, its 
large coal fields to draw its supplies from, backed up by its 
warships, now in excellent trim, and its exceptional array 
of torpedo boats, the United States could not land a single 
man in the Hawaiian islands." There is, perhaps, some 
bluff in that, but it is too near the truth to be pleasant. 
There is enough in it to show that we should not create a 
point inviting attack 2,100 miles from our shores, and 
which, when once annexed, we must defend at whatever 
cost. 

A Greater The including of suburban populations 
San Francisco's within the municipal area of the city to 
Civic Pride. which they rightfully belong, is the 
trend of the period. The uniting of 
city and suburbs is quite the vogue. London first set the 
example and on all hands the work of the County Council 
receives commendation. Works of great public utility are 
carried out better than before, the interest of the people 
in municipal affairs has immeasureably increased, and a 
healthy rivalry has sprung up among the different parts 
of the great metropolis. Its educational facilities have 
wonderfully increased, its water supply has been greatly 
bettered, whilst its gas has been cheapened. The other 
day a tunnel under the Thames through which trains can 
pass, and which cost nearly $5,000,000, was declared open 
for traffic with great eclat, and with due credit to the 
council for the manner in which it had been conducted to 
completion. Ambitious Chicago was not slow to follow the 



July 10, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



example of the older European City. The Union of the 
center with its circumference la an accomplished fact and 
nobody in the windy city would now go back to the pre- 
existing order of things. Bigger men now till '.he larger 
offices and civic pride is now on a higher and better plane. 
New York, jealous of her status as the most populous 
city in the Union, was not slow to imitate her pretentious 
rival, and. despite great difficulties, is now united with all 
ber outlying parts, and has thereby saved her supremacy. 
So strong has the feeling become that none but the best 
men can now be elected to the higher offices, that even 
Tammany Hall feels compelled to yield to the inevitaole 
and is making strenuous efforts to obtain a Mayoral candi- 
date of the very highest class. It is willing to set aside 
all personal preferences, and party differences in order to 
obtain an able, confidence inspiring, and winning candi- 
date. He may even be a Clevelandite, if he can but win. 
In other respects its present attitude is beyond reproach, 
and in strange contrast with much of its recent history. 
On all sides it is confessed that the creating of a greater 
New York has rendered this wonderful transformation one 
absolute necessity to success. Why should not that which 
has proven so beneficial to Chicago and New York be 
equally advantageous to San Francisco? We can see no 
reason why it should not, but many why it should. We 
have need of all the people who by virtue of location right- 
fully belong to us. On the other side of the bay there is a 
large population, living in homes of their own and given 
to great independence in matters municipal. They can 
keep their saloons within reasonable control, change their 
Chief of Police whenever, in their judgment, the public 
good requires it, and prevent vice in its most odious forms 
from floating itself on the public streets. Of course we 
ought to be able to do all these things equally well for our- 
selves on this side of the bay, but our whole history shows 
that we cannot. Prom the purer and better atmosphere 
of our suburbs we could draw a voting power, that, added 
to our own well meaning citizens, would constitute a 
majority for clean government. If there were no other 
reason for constituting a greater San Francisco that one 
alone should suffice. The Union could be effected and a 
suitable charter submitted to the next legislature. Better 
to try that than to worry over a new organic law fore- 
ordained to defeat. 

Now For Now that the tariff is out of the Senate, the 
Currency administration is intent upon taking up the 
Reform, question of currency reform. That is right, 
and in line with the platform's promise. It is 
understood that the President will seek authority from 
this Congress to appoint a commission of nine to report to 
the next. During this year nothing more can be done, 
but early in '98 the new measures ought to be in operation. 
It is pretty certain that the cancelling of the greenbacks, 
not suddenly, but as they may happen to come to the 
treasury, and the issuance of silver in their place, will 
form the principal feature of any proposed reform. If no 
gold coin were minted below ten dollars, such action would 
make a still larger market for silver, and is about all that 
can be safely done for it, unless the efforts to reach an in- 
ternational agreement be successful. 

As To The Society We had thought that the so-called 
For The society for the prevention of vice 

Prevention Of Vice, was dead. It must have been hid- 
ing its light under a bushel for at 
least three years past. If it has done anything during 
that time, it has escaped public notice. The last that we 
remember to have heard of it was when it was throwing 
the shield of its protection around its Secretary and his 
delinquencies. A monster of vice, he was the executive 
officer of the society for the prevention of it. Marvelous 
to say, the society tried to shield him, but happily failed. 
That proved too much for our good citizens who declined 
longer to support such a misnamed society. From that 
time to this it has been lying low, apparently ashamed to 
show its head. But thinking probably that its sins have 
been forgotten, it has suddenly broken out into the light 
of day. It has caused an erring couple, somewhat distin- 
guished in society, to be arrested for felony arising out of 
their mutual relations. The alleged crime was committed 
in Southern California, if anywhere. There the parties 



had relatives abundantly able to devise and carry out the 
besl measures possible under the circumstances. They 
were on the point of doing so, when it was learned that 
the couple were on their way to San Francisco. Then this 
moribund society leaped into life, sent its spies down the 
road to collect evidence, which they did by becoming 
participes crimives. On their arrival here the man and 
woman were arrested, and for the past week the dailies 
have spared no space to give every miserable detail of the 
unhappy affair, and much that has been published has been 
the imaginings of foul minded reporters. The harm that has 
been done thereby to the young has been incalculable and 
might have been avoided had a more discreet and at the 
same time more effective course been adopted. Now, if 
there are men, aye, and even women in the community 
(and we think there are) strong enough in their convic- 
tions and in the moral rectitude of their lives to compose 
a respectable society for the suppression of vice, it could 
find a wide sphere of usefulness in this city. There is a 
deal of vice hereabouts that needs suppressing, and 
any honest attempt to purify our environment would de- 
serve well of our people. What we object to is the exist- 
ence of the present society at all, because of its unfitness. 
It has once protected vice in its own ranks, and has now 
given it "a send off" that is truly lamentable. What next 
is it going to do? Why has it so long overlooked cases in 
our midst quite as bad as the Los Angeles one? Vice is 
vice wherever found, and ought to be suppressed. There 
are parts of this city reeking with it, and under Police 
protection, yet the society for its suppression is dumb. 
The law should be made to reach all alike, but in the name 
of all that is good and wise, give us somebody that is 
strong enough for the place. 

The Tariff Wends The tariff has passed the Senate by a 
Its majority of ten, and now goes to a 

Wearied Way. committee of conference of both 
Houses. It will emerge therefrom 
with a number of more or less important changes, and 
may be expected to become a law within the next two or 
three weeks. All classes are heart sick of the whole 
matter, and the business of the country is tired of tariff 
tinkerings, and yields a wearied submission to anything 
that ends the uncertainty that has too long prevailed. 
But it is a curious tariff which nobody cares to father. 
Since it first took form as the Dingley bill, everybody has 
had a hack at it, and now it is unrecognizable by its 
originator. A thing of shreds and patches made to catch 
votes, it is consistent with no principle, but pleases the 
trusts that supplied the campaign fund. That is the long 
and short of it. The Sugar Trust has been specially 
favored. It has got everything it evet asked for. The 
highest schedules of duties ever known have been given it 
for the benefit of its Eastern refineries, but absolute free 
trade has been imposed upon the Pacific Coast for the ex- 
press purpose of killing off its beet sugar industry. That 
most promising enterprise cannot co-exist with Hawaiian 
annexation or reciprocity. It can only continue a sickly 
existence and ultimately die. That being so, the new 
tariff is bound to prove little short of a calamity to the 
Pacific Coast. It will build no new industries worth 
speaking about, and this whilst killing off the one that has 
been started with so much promise as to cheer the whole 
State. It is a tariff that will not bear criticism, and 
therefore is not constructed to endure for any length of 
time. 

The Hawaiian The sugar planters get a renewal of 

Problem their reciprocity treaty, and the beet 

Not Settled Yet. sugar growers of California, Nebraska 

and other States are refused any sort 

of aid or protection for their industry. A bounty on 

their product was proposed, but ignominiously defeated. 

We shall now have absolute free trade in sugar on this 

Coast, but will find in this case that a free trade market 

is not the cheapest market. We shall have the duties we 

forego added to the price of the sugar we consume. That 

is very excellent turkey for the planters, but shockingly 

bad buzzard for us. They srain everything, whilst we 

shall lose an industry that promised great things for 

California. The cheap and forced labor of the islands cannot 

be competed with here. All this s so obviously opposed to 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 10, 1897. 



the policy of the Republican platform and stump, that 
we should all marvel how so great a wrong could be done 
our people, did we not know the control of the all-power- 
ful sugar trust, and its congressional agent, Mark Banna, 
who dispensed the campaign fund a~d knows whence it 
can-e. It is idle to blink the fact that certain of the 
Trusts that contributed that fund now rule this country. 
It is equally clear that the Sugar Trust means that Cali- 
fornia's beet industry must die. Peculiarly adapted, by 
climate and soil, to the growth of the sugar beet, as our 
State undoubtedly is, we should not be long in rendering ;i 
monopoly of sugar impossible to anybody. That is what 
tht Sugar Trust desired to nip in the bud. and that is 
why Hawaiian reciprocity was renewed, and a bonus to 
the beet sugar refused. That is why the Republican 
party was constrained to go back upon itself, and why a 
sore blow has been struck at the prosperity of California. 
Everybody knows who controlled the sensational votes, 
and it may be said with truth that the trail of the sugar 
serpent is o'er all that has resulted. It is a dastardly 
blow at the Pacific Coast whose representatives are nearly 
all Republicans. How they can come home and justify 
their party's action is beyond comprehension. It will con- 
stitute one of the curious features of coming politics. 
Still the conferees of both Houses have yet to be heard 
from, and, although we do not expect much from them, it 
may be that they will do bel'er than is anticipated. With 
reciprocity assured, annexation will be given a rest until 
a more convenient season arrives. Japan is very clearly 
pointing out what a source of weakness Hawaii would be 
to the United States, and the last has not yet been said on 
that point. 

The Hibernia Savings Assessor Siebe has filed his report 
ijand Loan Society. for the yearlH97; and, while there 
has been a material falling off in 
the total, owing, it is asserted, to the decrease in bank 
valuations, real estate holdings, and buildings, assessments 
show a gain. It is noted that the Hibernia Savings and 
Loan Society, of all the financial institutions of the city, 
shows an increase of more than a half million dollars. Its 
management has been conservative and sound, while its 
business has shown a steady and permanent increase. Its 
investments have been fortunate; and its bonds, wisely 
purchased, have demonstrated foresight and judgment. 
The Hibeinia holds eight million dollars of 4 percent. 
United States bonds, more than half a million 3j per cent. 
bonds of the District of Columbia; second notes of the value 
of more than 126,000,000, beside bonds of local railway 
systems, and other valuable securities. Mr. R. J. Tobin, 
the secretary of the Hibernia, during his recent visit East 
fortunately invested a large amount of idle capital in bonds, 
so that the earnings of the Bank, notwithstanding the 
general depression, have been steadily maintained. The 
entire assets of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 
are very nearly forty millions of dollars, represented, as 
has been shown, by coin in its vaults and gilt-edge secur- 
ities. This representative financial institution of the State 
is justly regarded as a tower of strength. Its long 
years of usefulness, its careful management, and unbroken 
success, entitle it to the most implicit confiderce of the 
public. " As sound as the Hibernia Bank " is an expres- 
sion of endorsement common in San Francisco, and, in 
commercial and financial circles, accepted as a complete 
title of absolute and actual worth. 

Our Mines If California were to pay more attention 
And to her early love, we think she would be 

Good Times, wooing back prosperity in the quickest 
way in sight. We do not wish to slight 
wheat raising or fruit growing, but on the contrary, 1 
that they may have every possible encouragement and go 
cin and prosper exceedingly. But our idea is that the 
State wants a quick turn on its investments at this time. 
We want some tangible evidence of the coming of the oft 
promised better times. A more general, and a more intelli- 
gent development of our mineral resources is the shortest 
cut we can see to the renewal of that prosperity we are 
all so ardently longing for. We want a more general dis- 
tribution of wealth, which means more gold and silver in 
every man's pocket, Well, there is enough of both metals 
in California, if we would but delve for them in the right 



way, and in the right places. Gold digging is not at an 
end yet, do. not by a great deal. In point of fact, there 
> 1 reason to doubt whether up to date it has made a 
respectable beginning in our State. "From the Sierras 
to the Sea and from Siskiyou to San Diego," there is yet 
in the earth a thousand times more gold than has so far 
been taken out of it. That mines, richer far than ancient 
Ophir knew, will yet extend from Oakland's mole up the 
intervening valley to the mountain peaks beyond, is as 
sure and certain as that water finds its level. It never 
has run up hill and never will. It flowed in mountain tor- 
rents from the Sierras, and where was it to find an outlet 
except in the Ocean? In streams as small as rivulets in 
some places, and as large as the Sacramento in others, 
the waters carried down quantities of the precious metals 
and nuggets of the largest and purest gold known to the 
mining world. As a matter of reasoning from the primal 
cause to the ultimate effect, it must be so. As a matter 
of proven experience in more parts of the world than our 
own, it u so. There are in the bed rock underlying the 
San Joaquin Valley, old river beds that will yet turn out 
more gold than the Pacific Coast has so far produced. 
The soil that spreads out over the valley is but the silt 
that was originally washed down from the mountains. 
The gold that came down with it is resting on the bed rock 
below, awaiting the skill and labor of man to make it come 
forth and bless a people who think they want nothing so 
badly as gold. We have the labor and the skill, and yon- 
der lies the gold! We have but to bring the three together 
and the problem as to the return of good times is solved. 

When n'avinir pok t drink .Inrkion's Napa Soda. 

X + + + + + + + + ++1- + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + X 

+ + 

I (Tonsider Facts I 
5 ^~ Like These | 



+ 
+ 
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-r 
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U. S. Departments at Washington 



Remington \qss% 

Typewriters used 



All Other Makes 



* 

370 ! 

+ 
+ 



Metropolitan Life Ins. Co., New York 

Remingtons m use 359 ! 



+ 

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Won), I th« bojr so many if not convinced they J 

.vere the Besl Ami Ihey use enough to make X 

it worth wlnl.. to be *'ir-- they are right. + 

They Prove Undoubted S uperiority. % 

+ 
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All Others 



Send for particulars about 
THE NEW MODEL No. SIX. 



+ WYCKOFF, SEAMANS &• BENEDICT, 
J 327 Broadway^ New York. 

X++++++++++++++++++++++++++++X 

San Francisco House, 211 Montgomery St- 



Christian Endeavor Rates 



Open to all via 



Chicago and Tforthwestern 
Z/tailwai/ 



San Francisco 
to Chicago, 
3% days. 

Through Daily Pullman and Tourist sleeping Cars 
R R. RITCHIE, Q A. P. C . No. •-• New Montgomery St , Palace Hotel 



To Chicago - - $25.00 
To St. Paul and Minneapolis, 26.75 
To Milwaukee - - 26.00 



July 10, 1897. 



SAN PRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 







s® 



" The Land o( the Castanet." Spanish sketches by A. C. Chatfield 
Taylor. Illustrated. Published by Herbert S. Stone & Co., 
tgo. 1896, 

Of the ten sketches of Spain and the Spanish which 
make up this volume, several have already appeared in 
Tne Cosmopolitan, and all were originally intended for 
publication in a magazine. The subjects dealt with are 
Spanish Society, Spanish Sports, Provincial Towns, the 
Common People, and the like. Mr. Obatfield-Taylor seems 
to have enjoyed some exceptional social advantages in 
traveling through Spain, and he has written a lively and 
interesting account of his rambles and experiences. The 
people of Spain are courteous and sweet-mannered, and 
even the humblest welcome you with genuine cordiality if 
you make your advances graciously. Though the Spanish 
gentleman to whom you may have brought a letter of in- 
troduction is not (owing generally to the smallness of his 
establishment and slender resources) hospitable in the 
sense of dinner-giving, he is charmingly attentive, and 
shows in numberless ways that his guest has a place in his 
thoughts. The chapter on Spanish sports is a good one. 
The national sport is, of course, bull-fighting, which is 
well described. So thoroughly a part of the national life 
is it that the profits of a corrida de toros are often devoted 
to the support of a hospital or other charitable institu- 
tion, and on one occasion in Madrid a fight was held for 
the benefit of the society for the prevention of cruelty to 
animals. The slaughter of the poor, inoffensive horses is 
the cruelest and worst feature of a sport that demands 
great quickness and nerve. Another sport common in 
Spain, though originally introduced from Saxon countries. 
is cock-fighting. It is irredeemably cruel and vulgar. The 
Spanish have, however, one sport worthy to rank with 
cricket, football, racquets, and the other great sports of 
Anglo-Celtic peoples. This is pelota, which is played in an 
oblong court with a ball like a racquet-ball, and a basket- 
work scoop fitting tightly to the hand and fore-arm. It 
is a wonderfully quick game, and to play it well requires 
great skill and endurance. The only unfortunate thing 
about pelota is that it is not often played by amateurs, the 
best players being always professionals. Mr. Chatfield- 
Taylor writes in a pleasant, chatty, graphic style, and 
displays an evident liking for the country and its inhabi- 
tants. There are enough historical details to render the 
present condition of Spain and her people intelligible. The 
last chapter is a description of the rock fortress of Gibral- 
tar, which, the writer says, shows the color, life, and 
smartness that mark the presence of the British soldier. 
One thing about the typography of the book strikes us as 
queer: the compound words, such as cobble-stones, anise- 
seed, broad-brimmed, night-watchman, and many others, 
are printed separately without the hyphen. We should 
like, too, to excise the opening sentence of Chapter I, 
which runs thus : "In the evolution of that proud, sensi- 
tive, indolent, sometimes cruel, but more often chivalrous, 
race whom we call the Spaniards, the elements of history 
have been so clearly defined, so varied in their effects, 
that each era has left an indelible imprint upon the na- 
tional character." This strikes us as pretentious and not 
very intelligible. Is there any nation upon the na- 
tional character of which "the elements of history" (what- 
ever they may precisely be) "have failed to leave an in- 
delible imprint ? " Is not national character the com- 
posite result of natural and historical causes? And what 
is exactly meant by saying that the "indelible imprint" 
left by each era is traceable to the clear definition and 
variety in effect of the elements of history ? We fancy 
that the author, not content to plunge at once in medias 
res, was ambitious to open his book with a philosophical 
reflection, and has got himself and his readers a little 
tangled up. The book might very well begin with the 
second sentence, in which Mr. Chatfield-Taylor expresses 
his wonder that Spain, the former mistress of the world, a 
land gifted by nature with many advantages and blessings, 



should have fallen into the second rank of nations. The 
volume is well pi inted, and is illustrated by many pood 
ogravures. Tl e • over is of red and yellow, in stripes 
of equal width, which are, we suppose, the national colors 
of Spain, but are better known to us as those of the 
Marvli-imne Cricket Club, familiar to all cricket-lovers as 
M. C. C. 

A writer in Scribner's Magazine has recently pointed 
out that the modern steel-frame building has no walls, the 
space between the uprights and the horizontals being 
merely filled in with 1 late "lass or non-transparent 
scree ns. The strength of a building used to depend on its 
walls : if they fell the building fell: hut this is so no longer: 
nowadays the steel cage is the building: the so-called walls 
of brick, marble, stone or glass might just as well be made 
of pasteboard or leather as of more durable materials. It 
is just possible, though it is by no means likely, that the 
new conditions may bring about the development of a new 
style of architecture. At present, however, the outer 
coverings of the steel cages are literal copies of old de- 
signs. Just as the Greeks said the last word in columnar 
architecture, so the designers of the great Gothic cathe- 
drals seem to have exhausted the possibilities of pointed 
architecture. All that is left for us to do is to copy, with 
more or less fidelity, their marvelous creations. Original- 
ity in modern architecture is hideousness. All the attempts 
that have been made at various times to wander outside 
of tradition in the construction of churches or domestic 
abodes have resulted in the production of monstrosities, 
occasionally somewhat mitigated by a certain prettiness 
or fancifulness. 

In October The Century Company will publish a collec- 
tion of Bishop Potter's speeches, addresses, and articles. 
The worthy prelate believes that parsons ought not to be 
debarred by their profession from offering their opinions 
upon civic and social matters. The difficulty, however, 
lies in telling when the parson is delivering the Biblical 
message and when he is ventilating his own social and eco- 
nomical theories. With all due respect to the Bishop of 
New York, we think that we have quite enough tinkerers 
at social and economical work without reckoning in the 
parsons as well. With Edward Bellamy, Henry George, 
W. J. Bryan, et hoc genus omne, still "alive and kicking," 
we are in a truly parlous state already. For goodness' 
sake, good Bishop Potter, don't spring the parsons on us. 

The July issue of The Traveler contains an article by 
Emma Seckle Marshall on National Homes for Veterans 
in California; "The Lariat : How it is Made 'and Used," 
by J. M. Scanland; "A Visit to the Home of England's 
Queen," by Mae Eleanor Gates, a young Californienne now 
in Europe; Lilian Ferguson's "This, That, and the Other;" 
and "British Beauties." by Arthur Inkersley. The last- 
mentioned article discusses feminine beauty in general, 
and is illustrated with photographs of the Countess of 
Warwick (Lady Brooke), Lady Helen Vincent, and Mrs. 
Langtry. On the cover of The Traveler is a photo-en- 
graving of a girl playing on a stringed instrument: it is 
rather mysteriously entitled " An Afternoon at the 
Springs." 

We have received from Mr. Altemus, a Philadelphian 
publisher, an "extraordinary literary note," in which he 
announces his intention of issuing a series of books by 
American authors at a retail price of thirty cents each, 
and goes on to remark that ' 'additional volumes by talented 
and popular American writers now in preparation will be 
issued as early as practicable." Do the words "as early 
as practicable" mean so soon as the "talented and popular 
American writers now in preparation" shall have under- 
gone a sufficient amount of preliminary training? And 
what is the nature of the "preparation" they are now re- 
ceiving? The first book issued in "Altemus' American 
Series" will be "Trif and Trixy,'' by John Habberton. 

"Hugh Wynne, Free Quaker," by Dr. Weir Mitchell, is 
now running serially through The Century, and will be 
published in book form in the autumn. It was about to 
be brought out as a book last year, but its great suitabil- 
ity for serial publication caused its issuance to be deferred 
for a year, so as to secure the profits of both ferns of 

publication. 

Health is wealth. Taroena makes you healthy. Druggists. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July io, 1897. 





" We obey no wand but pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 

SO far the Lyceum season at the Bald- 
win has disclosed precisely thirty 
minutes of all-round success. In the third 
week of costumes, costumes, costumes, it 
is notable that these thirty minutes come 
clothed in the undramatic garments of to- 
day, and that the actors in them are not the plush- 
poulliced favorites of the new Lyceum Company, but four 
modest talents and Miss Elizabeth Tyree. The success is 
a curtain-raiser of the comic weekly order, wherein a 
model couple visits a quarrelling couple and falls to fight- 
ing with such splendid intensity that thequarrellers agree 
to reform on the minute, and tactfully insist upon regard- 
ing their guests as good actors who have deliberately 
taught them a precious lesson. Of couise it is all 
exorbitantly unhuman, as most farces are, and unthinking 
men will say. "How like a woman!" and thoughtless 
women will say, "Just like a man!"; but the astute auditor 
will be pleased because the little piece is quick, funny and 
unostentatious, and above all. acted in brisk, farcical 
spirit. Miss Tyree is a young woman of strict limitations, 
but she has a certain hard modernity that is valuable in 
parts that do not clamor for what is technically expressed 
as sympathy. She plays the model wife modelly. The 
model husband is a good bit of consistent extravagance by 
.Mr. .1. Brandon Tynan; and Mr. Joseph Wheelock actually 
surpasses the opportunities of the quarrelling husband by 
lifting him to almost naturalness. Miss Helen Macbeth is 
satisfied with a staple representation of the martyr-wife. 
The farce is charmingly called When a Man's Married; the 
writer of it is programmed "X. L., author of // Was « 
Dream." I suspect X. L. of being one of the Frohmans' 
tamed dramatists doing good work in disguise. 
* * * 

The curtain raiser gives way to Thi Mayflower, "an 
idyllic love story " in three acts by Louis N. Barker, co- 
author of famous Rosemary. I am sure that Tht Mayflower 
is a better play than The Firs/ Gentleman of Europe, and I 
have hopes that it is inferior to Rosemary by several shades 
of intelligence and art. 

Here is the scheme in brief : 

The lovers love at. first sight in Amsterdam in the spring- 
tune. He is discovered to be a lord, the son of her father's 
enemy, and he is shown the door. 

The lovers elope in Plymouth, England, in the autumn. 
Her father is about to set sail with the Bilgrims fur 
America when the lord carries her off on a pillion. The 
lord has a friend, an honest man who cannot tell a lie — he 
is always doing the right thing in the wrong place : he 
gives chase to the eloping lovers. The maid's father has 
just executed a curse scene, ending with a vow to disbe- 
lieve in God unless He will send him some special evidence 
of His existence. In comes the friend Jack bearing the 
maid Joan, and God is saved. 

The love's are united in New England in the following 
spring. Friend Jack has fallen in love witc her, too, he 
does not believe that the lord's intentions were honorable, 
and he lays patient siege at the bruised heart. The humor 
of this last act is none the less fabulous for being unin- 
tentional. Food and flowers are scarce in New England 
in the early seventeenth century, yet Joan and her rela- 
tions and friends enjoy posies and other delicacies of the 
season — they are found about the cabin door, hanging on 
nails. You are getting used to the costume drama now 
and are not looking for stern reality: you are ready to 
accept the Pilgrim's belief that some good angel comes 
down and does the marketing — when suddenly you catch a 
glimpse of something soiled and terrible dodging about in 
the background from tree to tree. You think of Indians 
and detectives and other shifty creatures of the stage, 
until it moves down into the open and hangs plump birds 
and rich flowers on the nails by the cabin door. And then 
you see that it is Mr. Hackett. 

Eventually Mr. Hackett is shot by mistake. Having 



had your own doubts at an earlier moment as to what he 
really was, you can understand the mistake. Need I say 
that he does not die, that Joan's heart is true, that she 
loves Jack only as a brother and he bears it as a man, 
that the lovers are just in time to blend their nuptial cele- 
bration with the nuptial celebration of the comic relief 
couple? 

As a picture play The Mayflower is pretty and dreamy. 
In the first act and half of the second the writing is easy 
and to the point, and, if the real dramatic essence is not 
pungent, there is at least a touch of manners and a whiff 
of atmosphere. Then there is a prologue in the quaint old 
deprecatory style, which Miss Mannering reads delight- 
fully, and the scenery is of beauty and effectiveness. But 
to accept the curse scene and the last act seriously, one 
would have to be drugged. Mr. Parker has taken out a 
poets' license, and in a note on the programme he disclaims 
co-operation with history or tradition. The last lines of 
the prologue are, as nearly as I remember: 

And take some kindly thought as you go hence, 
That all was writ in deepest reverence. 

This is modest, but unconvincing. A man may even be 
stupid and still write in reverence; but when he is funny — 
as funny as Mr. Parker is when the old gentleman curses 
and the young lord dodges among the trees and hangs sou- 
venirs on the homestead, and gets shot for Heaven knows 
what — then reverence turns to ribaldry. Mr. Parker is 
altogether too gay in the last act to anything like live up 
to his prologue. And his character work, it seems to me, 
is not conceived in the true spirit of devotion. There is, 
for instance, the Dutch dialect comedian. Poetic license 
or no poetic license, the farce-comedy Dutchman is an 
anachronism in the Pilgrim drama. You might as well 
try to innoculate a tramp specialty. And then there is 
the Puritan — the only one in the play; he is in the last 
stages of decomicality, and he is an offense even to his au- 
thor toward the end of the piece. And the character of 
friend Jack — think of all the heart possibilities the plot 
gives him ! and observe how unerringly Mr. Parker has 
avoided them. 

No; I shall not gush over The Mayflower. I shall wait 
for Rosemary and the difference. 



Considering the frail chances for consistent character in 
this play, the company does fairly well. Miss Mannering's 
Joan is over-sugared, but more repressed than her other 
work, and on the whole the picture is soft and maidenly. 
A man who can play so botched a part as well as Mr. 
Morgan plays Jack is worthy of better things. He shouts 
once, only once, and then it is in competition with that 
jolly Frohmaniac, Mr. Hackett; otherwise he acts with 
sympathy and discretion — acts ten-fold better than his 
author wrote. Mr. Morgan, it strikes me, only needs to 
lose a few mannerisms and find a good part for his future 
to be in the present tense. So long as John Mallory is 
gentle and human. Mr. Walcott handles him with the good 
old craft, but he plays the cursing moment for all it is 
worth, and the value is principally comedic. Miss Tyree, 
on the other hand, goes about her part — she is Cecelia, a 
companion of Joan's — in a strictly business-like way, with- 
out the aids of warmth, magnetism, or any of those beau- 
tiful things, and you must admire the technical nicety of 
her work, even if it does not bring you any particular ex- 
citement. Mr. Hackett, I cannot help feeling, is hopelessly 
enamoured of himself; his characters are a series of imita- 
tions of Hackett: he has cultivated the stage-manners of a 
vain woman and the elocutionary resources of a catinon; 
there is scarcely a minute in the piece — no matter how 
poor the part — when his incorrigible ego does not stand 
between you and the author. 

* * * 
It must be a matter of some grief to Mr. Augustin Daly 
that the best adaptation he ever made is practically use- 
less to him because there is no part in it for Miss Rehan. 
The finest work the Frawleys ever accomplished was with 
Tht Two Escutscheons; out of everything they ever played, 
Bret night of the second season stands particular and 
brilliant in my memory. Frank Worthing, Tyrone Power 
and Maxine ElMott — they shone that night! I did not ad- 



July 10, 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



mire Miss Elliott then as I do now — her manner was 
beautiful, but she lacked the sympathy. But Worthing 
and Power, they were wonderful. The little comedy 
wears; I have Been it four or five times altogether; I sat 
through it again this week, and 1 forgot again that I was 
working. There are times when oven the paid skeleton 
-enjoys the feast. The present production is an excellent 
one. although in one or two particulars not equal to the 
first. Mr. Hamilton's is a good baron, but not so splendidly- 
earnest as Power's. Miss Bates, however, plays the 
widow with sweet sympathy and polished humor. Mr. 
Worthing has gone back to his better self in a single 
bound; I know of no other actor who could play Von 
Vinck with such absolute identity. Worthing is an artist 
of the first selection, when he tries to be that and nothing 
less; and I admire him tremendously — so much so that I 
would cheerfully see him hanged and quartered ever} time 
he chooses to encroach upon the province of the mouther. 
From the farce-comedy standpoint, Mr. Clark's Chicagoau 
is acted comically and consistently — but I think he under- 
rates his man a bit. Miss Wallis plays the American girl 
breezily, with a quite charming touch of race, although 
she is handicapped by Mr. Ross, who plays up to her with 
insecure address. 

* * * 

" Let me introduce you to Mr. Dockstader," said Philip 
Hastings. 

; ' Not the Dockstader, not old Lew Dockstader ? " 

He was a quietly dressed, intelligent-looking young man 
of about, I should say, thirty-five; and he seemed pleased 
at my surprise. 

"According to you gentlemen of the press," he said, " I 
should be a hundred now at any minute — in reality, I'll 
strike forty at noon next month. Maybe it's my jokes, 
but my age seems to travel before me; strange hotel peo- 
ple make up feather beds and mush when they hear I'm 
coming; when I register they ask me where my father is. 
Say, I wish you'd set it right for me." 

It gives me the greatest pleasure in life to introduce 

Mr. Dockstader as a rising young artist in the variety. 

Any one who has seen his famous work at the Orphem will 

agree with me that he has a bright future to grow up to. 

Ashton Stevens. 

There are three new acts at the Orpheum. T. W. 
Eckert and Emma Berg have found an agreeable way of 
serving up the operas in their sketch, Master and Pupil; 
Miss Imogene Comer sings melodramas and heart stories 
in sturdy barytone voice; and Harry Le Clair affects fe- 
male vocalization and costumes in character songs. All 
the acts take well, but Lew Dockstader is still the hero 
of the bill. Next week Prey and Fields, sketch artists; 
Perry and Burns, Irish comedians; Wm. Whyte, basso; 
and Lillian Perry, soubrette — a big list of novelties. 

The First Born will play its last night at the Alcazar on 
Sunday. The farce, A Victim of Circumstances, precedes 
the Chinese play. It is old-fashioned, but very amusing in 
some of the situations. Mr. George Trader is particularly 
happy as the victim. Miss Selene Johnstone is uneasy 
and stagey as "the angel." Better work is expected of 
her in a part of less frivolous character. The company 
gives conscientious support. Next week Lester Wallack's 
celebrated Rosedale will be revived with Mr. Francis Car- 
lyle, the new leading man, in the cast. Mr. Osbourne, 
Miss Johnson, Mr. Trader, and Miss Belgarde will be of 
the performers. 

Next week the Frawleys have another sure thing in the 
way of play: Lucette Ryley's sparkling comedy, Christo- 
pher, Jr., which was practically "discovered" in this city. 
Frank Worthing will play the Drew part, and there is no 
reason why he should not make it a perfection. It will be 
interesting to see what Miss Bates will do with Maude 
Ada-n's role. 

The Lyceum company commences its final week at the 
Baldwin Theatre with The Late Mr. Castello, a whimsical 
farce by Grundy. It was in this play that Miss Manner- 
ing "caught on" in New York. Modern clothes — no cos- 
tumes. The Late Mr. Castello, preceded by a one-act 
tragedy, The Wife of Willoughby, will play on Monday and 
Tuesday. At the Saturday matinee Mr. Castello, and in- 
stead of the tragedy Miss Mannering and Mr. Hackett 



will appear iu the balcony scene from Romeo and Juliet. 

Wednesday, The First Omtkman; Thursday and Saturday, 
Zenda; Friday, The Min/tlatn-r. Sunday morning the 
theatre closes for two weeks. 

Wang comes to a brilliant finish at the Tivoli to-morrow 
night. Monday, The Isle ,,f Champagne, which we have 
not seen here, with Edwin Stevens in the part made 
famous by Thomas Q. Seabrooke. Mrs. Seabrooke will 
play her original role, Precilla, the Puritan. The 
book of The Isle is by Alfred Byrne and Louis Harrison, 
and is said to be immense; the music is by our ex-towns- 
man, William Furst. Scenery and ballet are promised 
galore, and the whole Tivoli company in the cast. 

Charles Ulrich, a well-known local journalist, has written 
a Chinatown drama, entitled A Celestial Maiden, which will 
be produced at the Oakland Theatre next Monday evening. 
The play is said to be a novel one in many respects, and 
now that there is a popular craze for Chinese plays, it 
stands a good chance to win. 

Gl 1 ' TL J- The" Gem" Theatre of the Coast. 

OIUmDia I nBatre- Friedlander, Gottlob&Co., Lessees 
and Managers 
Monday, July 12th, and during the week, 

THE FRAWLEY COMPANY, 

The most perfect dramatic organization in America, presenting 
the great comedy, by Madeline Lucette Ryley, CHRISTO- 
PHER JR. 
July 19th: Pudd'nhead Wilson. 

D I j ' Tl_ _L al. Hayman & Co., (Incorporated 

Baldwin I heat re- proprietors) 

Commencing Monday, July 12th. last week of Daniel Frohman's 

LYCEUM THEATRE STOCK GO. 

Monday and Tuesday evenings, first time here, Sydnev Grundy's 
comedy success. The Late Ma Castello; "Wednesday even- 
ing, The FiRst Gentleman of Europe; Thursday and Satur- 
day evenings, The Prisoner of Zenda; Friday evening, The 
Mayflower: Saturday matinee — Special. The Late Mr 
Castello and Balcony Scene from Romeo and Juliet; James 
K. Hackett as Romeo, Mary Mannering as Juliet. 
Next Attraction: Mr. John Drew in "Rosemary." 

Mrs. Ernestine hireling. 

Proprietor and Manager 

The Edwin Stevens comic opera season. Last nights of the 
greatest of suocesses, WANG. 

Commencing Monday, July 12th, every evening, the sparkling 
comedy opera, 

THE ISLE OF CHAMPAGNE. 

Edwin Stevens as King Mumm. Great cast; grand ballets; 
superb scenery, costumes, and effects. 
Popular Prices 25o and V'o 

1 San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall, O'Farrell 

r P l\e U rn . street, between Stockton and Powell s treets . 
Weak commencing Monday, July 12th; first time of 

FREY Z> FIELDS, 

Sketch artists; John Perry & Maurice Burns, Irish comedians; 
William. Whyte, the great. Australian basso; Lillian Perry, 
singing and dancing soubrette; positively last week of Lew 
Dockstader and noron & Herbert. 

Reserved seats, 25o ; balcony 10c; opera chairs and box seats 50o. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. Matinee Prices : 
Parquet, any seat, 25c; balcony, any seat, 10c; children. 10c, 
any part. 

r\ I y-r* L J_ Belasco & La Faille, Lessees and Man- 

MlCaZar I neatre. agers; Mark Thall, Director. 

Week of July 12th; matinee Saturday at 2:15. First appearance 
at this theatre of Mr. Frances Caklyle. Elaborate scenic 
production of Lester Wallack's drama, 

ROSEDALE, 

with the full strength of the Alcazar Company. 

Box office open daily from 9 a. m. to 10 p. m. A good seat for 

15c, 25c, 35c, or 5Uc 

For a first-class Fish, For a first-class Hunt, 

For a first-class Camp, 

For a delightful rest at some beautiful Resort, 

Go to that oountry tributary to the 



Tivoli Opera House. 



Free Camping Grounds, 
Clean, Comfortable Hotels, 
Moderate prices wiLhin the 
reach of ail. 
Low Railroad Rates. 



San Jrancisco and 
Tforth Pacific *%. 



For detailed information apply at TICKET OFFICE: 650 MARKET ST., 
(Chronicle Building), or GENERAL OFFICE: Cor. Sansome and Califor- 
nia streets. 

A. W. FOSTER, Pres. and Gen'l Mgr. R X. RYAN, Gen. Pass. Agt 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 10, 1897. 



V f 7 */ . • J —^\ | J; 1 . , ,Vz>f ^ - 



THE ancient monitor Comanche, having on board the 
San Francisco battalion of the Naval Reserve, was 
v steaming by McXear's Point after a three days 
practice cruise last Monday afternoon, when she was 
hailed by a number of yachts from the Corinthian Club. 
Most of the Naval Reserve boys had had about two hours' 
sleep in sixty hours, and on the warm afternoon all but 
the necessary watch on deck were snoring lustily below. 
The chief petty officer on the Comanche is J. Seaver Mills, 
who fills the honorable position of Chief Bos'ns Mate. Be 
is an old Corinthian, and, when the yachts came up, there 
was a general demand for Mills. 

"Joe Mills, come forth! Where is Joe? " and the sleepy 
mate periodically came up to salute his friends, while he 
yawned openly at the demonstration. 

After he had gone below for the fourth time, the 
schooner Five Brothers, with a holiday party composed of 
Mills personal friends and relatives, hove to, and the 
young women shrieked hysterically for Joe. 

Commander Turner, of the Comanche, became convinced 
that his crew was being made the butt of a practical 
joke. He called angrily down the companionway to his 
mate: 

"Say, Joe, a crcwd of drunks out here in a schooner are 
yelling for you! " 

Mills came up, rubbed his eyes, and recognized his 
friends, whose sobriety the commander had impeached. 

"Those girls are members of my own family," he re- 
marked stiffly. ' ' They don't drink ! " 



At the Bryan meeting in Central Park on Wednesday 
afternoon, seats were at such a premium that many and 
various devices were employed to avoid the necessity of 
the long stand in the hot sun. A favorite ruse was to im- 
personate a newspaper reporter, and some of the occu- 
pants of the press seats would, if their journalistic con- 
nection were genuine, create havoc in local editorial 
rooms. Observing the general success of this scheme, 
Eugene Lent, who served his apprenticeship on the Ex- 
aminer, returned for a few moments to journalism that 
afternoon, and escaped from the motley crowd by climbing 
into the reporters' row. Then he tried to play chaperone 
to a string of Pacific- Union Club members, who were in 
his wake, among them his father, General William M. 
Lent. 

"Reporter?" asked the usher, sarcastically. 

"Yep," answered General "Bill," blithely, as became a 
sprig of journalism. 

"What paper?'' persisted the usher, severely. 

"Er — oh — er — " floundered the General, for once at a 
loss for an explanation. 

"Ladies' Home Journal," prompted Judge Campbell, in 
a whisper, from the rear of the old mine owner. 

"Oh, yes! I could not recall the name for the moment. 
Ladies' Home Journal," repeated General Lent, firmly. 

"Walk right in, madam," said the usher, politely, with 
a bow. "Those front seats are for ladies. Take one!" 
which the General unblushingly did. 



Among the frequent visitors to the United States Mint, 
in this city, is an intelligent and fairly well read Chinese. 
He is greatly interested, not merely in the process of 
coinage, but the booking and check system employed in 
that department of the Government, and in the pursuit of 
information frequently appealed to Frank Washington, 
the bookkeeper. The other day Washington asked him 
his name. 

"Li Fong Chang," replied the visitor. 

"Oh, there's only one Chang.'' remarked the book- 
keeper, jocularly. ' He is Li Hung Chan- 

"What you name? ' asked the Chinese. 

"Frank Washington ■ 

"Heap d n fool. Only one Washi'ton. Him George." 



When a lawyer is elevated to the Superior Bench, his 
first official act is usually to have his features photo- 
graphed, and his second to present his portrait to his 
brother jurists. In planning his summer vacation one of 
the Judges concluded to spend his holidays apart from his 
family in the mountains, while his wife took the children to 
Santa Cruz. After packing her husband's grip, Mrs. 
Judge began to collect some necessaries for her own out- 
of-town sojourn, and went to the photograph rack to get 
her husband's portrait "to spoon over," as she expressed 
it. She had no sooner established herself at the seaside 
than she began to feel homesick, and as a panacea, she 
dived into the trunk and produced the photograph. Her 
feelings beggared description when she found that the 
cherished picture represented, not her adored husband, 
but his former colleague, Judge Murphy. In her haste 
she had carried off the wrong cabinet. When the lady re- 
turneu to town, she told the story, as a good joke at her 
own expense, to Judge Murphy. That usually choleric 
gentleman was highly flattered, rather missing the point 
of the story. 

"Most happy, my dear madam, he said." "Most happy. 
I'm sure," he repeated, smilingly. 

"Ob, but consider how unhappy /was," said the lady, 
with cruel candor. 

"Eh! What?" ejaculated Judge Murphy, as his smile 
gradually congealed. 

"You know, I really wanted to spoon over the photo- 
graph," she repeated, with unflattering emphasis. 
* # * 

With rod and line Carey Friedlander and "Weary" 
Bob Woodward spent the holidays in whipping trout 
streams. Carey worked steadily from daybreak to dark, 
but Woodward, who is known as a passive fisherman, 
spent most of his time under a shady tree, guarding the 
commissary. His companion reproached him, then did 
some urging, culminating in some jeers, and a fine burst of 
sarcasm. Bob heard his friend with an unmoved counte- 
nance. 

"How many have you caught, anyway?" demanded 
Carey. 

"One," answered "Weary," imperturbably. 

"One!" echoed Friedlander, with profound scorn. 

" But it's a big one," pursued Woodward. "Bigger 
than any of yours." 

Carey was incredulous and demanded an inspection. 
Woodward, with a flourish, produced an insignificant trout, 
whereat his chum sniffed contemptuously. 

" Weighs four pounds," answered the lazy one, calmly. 

"Come off, 'weary'! It doesn't weigh two! " 

" Bet you ten," remarked Bob. 

The wager was taken, the scales brought into requisi- 
tion, and Woodward won with an ounce to spare. Carey 
could not understand it, but he paid up. That night, when 
sleep reigned, he arose and investigated that trout alone. 
It was filled with small shot. 



The ferry depot was crowded with a full complement of 
the reception committee, when a special containing hun- 
dreds of Christian Endeavor delegates discharged its pas- 
sengers, who pressed their hot and dusty way among their 
numerous guides. An Eastern clergyman walked off the 
boat, accompanied by his little son. The latter, excited 
by the Endeavor choruses, took off his hat to cool his 
aching head. The boy unconsciously extended his hat be- 
fore his father, and an intelligent policeman, on the </ui 
vine for crooks, promptly arrested the child for begging. 
When the father remonstrated, the cop prepared to ar- 
rest the minister as a confederate. An Endeavor Recep- 
tion Aide finally straightened out the tangle, but one dele- 
gate's faith in California hospitality is somewhat shaken. 
* * * 

Already the vanguard of Bohemia has advanced. upon 
Meeker's Grove, where the annual Midsummer Jinks will 
take place Saturday, July 24th. Professor H. T. Stewart 
is the Sire, and a host of "the talent " of the club will 
stand in as usual to sustain the high reputation of those 
delightful gatherings. The principal feature of the high 
inks will be some scenes from Faust, that mystic legend 
which has so often furnished a theme for the poet, painter 
and musician. The time-honored ceremonies attending 



N«w» Lcttar 




Huntington Falls, 
golden Sate ParK. 



a. 
x 




m 



' 



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V o 
l| 



July 10. 1897. 



3AN FRANCISCO NEWS I.ETrER. 



rcmatiou of Care will be conducted with more than 
usual solemnity by Bohemia's revered High Priest, George 
T Bromley. 

1 p through tbi- night's >oft haze, 
Let tlie pyre's joyous blaze 
Tell to Bohemia that care's life has sped. 
Long lire this grand design. 
Quaff* ,leep the liubblint: wine, 
l'oliemia triumphs, for gnm fare is dead. 
While the linger of time is kept busy on that dial, the 
low jinks stars will render an original conception of Faust, 
greatly differing from the old school version. The cartoon 
on the Sire's proclamation is very artistic, showing the 
owl and Mephisto perched on the branches of a redwood 

t ree. 

* * * 

On his way home from Washington, John D. Spreckels 
eucountered in the Pullman an Englishman who had been 
everywhere and who knew everyone. No place could be 
mentioned which he had not visited and do reference could 
be made to any distinguished personage whom the 
Londoner did not immediately identify as his very dearest 
and oldest friend. It finally ceased to be even amusing, 
and, perceiving Mr. Spreckel's bored look, the English- 
man prepared to relinquish his prey. 

"My name is Briuacombe," he said, and glanced inquir- 
ingly at the San Franciscan. 

"Spreckels," responded that gentleman, briefly. 

"Ah! " commented the ubiquitous Englishman, who had 
been reading the papers. "I know Mr. John D. Spreckels 
very well. He's an especial friend of mine. Know him?" 
he inquired, with ari indulgent smile, which plainly classi- 
fied the companion of his tete-a-tete in a very different 
category from the celebrated subject of the conversation. 
"Know him?" 

"Not very well," admitted Mr. Spreckels, modestly. 

"Oh, well, I'll introduce you," promised the generous 
Briuacombe, grandiloquently. "John D. Spreckels is a 
good man for you to know. Drop me a line when we get 
to San Francisco, and remind me of my promise!" 

* # # 

"O Tempora, O Mores!" The practical philosophy 
of the modern bridal couple would verily put Soc- 
rates to shame ! At a recent wedding the. following 
affair on the side was uot the least interesting inci- 
dent which certain members of that audience espied. 
This particular spectacle showed the bride in a series of 
interesting convulsions incident to violent efforts made by 
five admiring ushers, who were intent upon securing a 
farewell kiss. As the kindly vestibule concealed the gym- 
nasts, we are free to suppose that great gusto greeted 
success, and under the circumstances, what else could the 
poor girl do, when the opportunity was final, and she 
knew it, too? 

The groom was bent, meanwhile, upon waiting the cor- 
tege near the altar, so that deal, naturally, left him out in 
the cold; but no vulgar jealousy could have disturbed his 
equilibrium, when previous engagements to several of the 
bridesmaids had fallen to his share. 

* * * 

The North Pacific Coast Railroad Company has put on 
a special car for the convenience of annual commuters 
across the bay. This may not meet the approval of the 
transient summer patron of the line — who perforce, elbows 
his way on boat and train, and seizes with ruthless vigor 
everything not nailed down. In taking extra care of its 
regular business, and at the same time giving the summer 
rush an even run for its money, Stetson's road has per- 
formed a service much appreciated by the commuters 

aforesaid. 

* # 

"Well, sir, what do you think of that?" asked C. D. 
Robinson, the artist, of the German critic who stood 
squinting at one of his paintings of Vernal Falls. 

"Why, I t'ink it vas all mist.-" 

If the critic meant the good old English mist, Mr. Rob- 
inson is delighted; but if he had in mind the German mist, 
which is a popular sort of fertil'.zer, it is quite a different 

matter. 

Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 
cures Poison Oak and all skin diseases. The oldest and best remedy, 
whioh has cured thousands. At all druggists. 



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1 AUCTION . . . 

?b 
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4, BY —— 

% VON RHEIN & CO. 



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Bij order of HON. flDOLPH SUTRO, J 

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fib At 12 M. sharp, '■'■• 

fif? At 513 California Street, fib 

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% O. L. BLOCK 239 5 

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fip view; facing the Ocean and Sutro Heights; Sutro Blectrio q? 

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Sutro Htilgbta. 





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JL and not to construct dwellings worth less than $2600. ^ 



1 RANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 10, 1897 



HOW IT HAPPENED. 



By 1. 11. 11 \n I ■ 
" \y v changing the subject. 

I M '>ok bored and failing 

Whereat a tide of warm color wandered up 
from somewhere under the trig collar of her modish shirt 
iug the point of her parasol viciously into 
the grassy turf. 

panion. indifferently. 
"I've pen • know, hoping that you might even- 

tual!;. Shall we stroll here in 

e tennis court '.' 
"Neither," was the ungracious response. "I am tired 
of the verything. f believe 1 will go 

I. ignoring the evident inference that the 
v of an elderly dyspeptic was preferable to his. lli~ 
tall form contrasted well with the trim, erect figure by 
le, and as they approached the broad, cool veranda. 
a select coterie of blue-blooded tabbies compared 1 
accordingly. Grattan was ranked in the eligible list, and 
his devotion to the beauty of the season had been the sub- 
ject of lively comment for a fortnight. As to the n 
oets were about even. Eden had a serpent, and Del 
Monte, its garden prototype on a probably improved plan, 
has i' 

1 California girls must be difficult to please.' ob- 
.1 Grattan, a> they neared the big hoi 
" Because we do not choose to marry any man who 
the flippant retort, 
i your pardi red. "1 assure yon that 

matrimony entirely from my thoughts a moment 
ader the oaks yonder. I had l>ei .Monte only in mind, 
and was marveling that you could, even under the present 
distressing circumstance of my proximity to yourself, find 
nvironment dull. To me it is the one perfect 
n all the world, and badly as you have seen fit to 
e toward me here I shall always 
But Miss Chesterfield, with a scornful glance that would 
have crushed a less courageous man, abruptly terminated 
the conversation by disappearing within the hostelry. 

Three weeks later in San Francisco, on a bright June 
day. when G rattan's card was brought to her boudoir, 
erfield descended to the drawing room, deter- 
mined to refuse the young man so peremptorily this, 
that he would never broach the subject of marriage again 
aim, proprietary ways, unlike those of any man she 
.had ever known, piqued and fascinated her by turns. De- 
rved a lesson. No California' girl with the 
kind of spirit would tolerate his firm, masterful 
manner. The Eastern young woman probably had queer 
preferences for that sort of thing. True, he was uni- 
formly courteous: yet where other men exerted them- 
to please, anil approached her with flattering defer- 
he was but politely agreeable. It wa 
irritating. 

Her caller seated himself on a divan opposite ber. 
' I start for .New York to-night.' he remarked cheer- 
fully " N'o doubt this will be good news for vou. I might 
'urtb( -faction by saving that in "all 

likelihood 1 sha: > alifornia . tut before I 

.ething I should like to sav to you.'' 
He paused, and flecked an imaginary bit of dust from 

any more," l.e 

cnnti ' ugh in answer to her thoughts. 

apologize for having laid siege 

ice 1 must 

ibly vou were right ■ 

.- mail 

and '■ very wilful', gp 

That's wl 
ardly think' vou will 

us shake I 

field 

a man who has the 
and tell me he n 



be his wife.'' She moved toward the door and Grattan 
followed her. 

" Vou entirely misunderstand," he began, gravely, and 
though the hall was dimly lit, she could see how white his 
face was But she turned contemptuously away, and the 
next instant the front door opened and closed. 

istairs the girl flung herself upon a couch. I'm glad 
he's gone," she said, taking the nearest silken pillow into 
her confidence. Then she buried her lovely face therein, 
and wept with ruinous effect upon its embroidered surface. 

Half an hour later she rang sharply for her maid. 

" Klorette, " she commanded, " make me presentable, if 
you can, and be quick about it. I'm going out. Bring me 
"the street gown that you think I look best in. And take 
particular pains with my hair." 

» * * * * 

The Piedmont was crowded with passengers. Among 
them, on the lower deck, a tall young man paced ncr 
vously. A girl, watching him from over the railing above, 
blushed under a becoming vail and sighed. The boat 
swung ponderously into its < >akland slip, and its human 
freight, followed by the baggage, moved eastward and dis- 
tributed itself in various directions on the pier among the 
waiting trains. Arrived at the overland flyer, Grattan 
handed his grip to a darkey porter, and was about to fol- 
low it into the Pullman, when he felt a restraining touch 
upon his arm. and turned to look into the fine hazel eyes of 
the belle of the season. 

"I didn't want you to go away thinking me so horribly 
rude," she explained. Her embarrassment and contrition 
were delicious to behold. She held out a daintily-gloved 
hand, which Grattan for the moment was too astonished 
to take. Her eyes filled with tears. 

" Don't go away hating me," she said, in a small, uncer- 
tain voice. 

The young man imprisoned both her hands tightly in one 
of his, and with the other drew his watch from his pocket. 

"Madeleine," said he, ''this train leaves in precisely 
three and one-quarter minutes, but that's time enough for 
you to make me the happiest fellow alive. Once for all, 
will you marry me ? I have fifteen thousand a year and 
the Grattan homestead on the Hudson. Let this be our 
wedding trip. Jump aboard, dear girl, and God bless you?" 

" What ! You want me to elope ? " gasped Miss Ches- 
terfield. 

" Why not ? Saves no end of bother — can wire your 
people from Sixteenth-street station — write particulars 
later — married safe and sound at Sacramento— and there 
you ate. Nothing easier." 

"Aboard ! " sang out a conductor, warningly. The train 
began to creep. 

San Francisco or New York, Madeleine?" 

" New York," echoed Miss Chesterfield, her pretty foot 
on the platform. 

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July 10, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTER. 




j-TF it be true, as some 
1 assert, that the first 
move of the fashionable vocal teacher of the day is for the 
pupils to leave off their corsets, what an opportunity for 
artistic posing is afforded for artists in search of such ! 
The wonder is that Amadee and Donald do not unite forces 
and consolidate the studio. 

* * # 

A number of girls were chatting on the veranda of a 
fashionable hotel upon the utter selfishness of the men of 
the day hereabouts. Said one : "Iithey would only get 
up some sort of a spree — even a Dutch treat business — I'm 
sure I for one would gladly pay my share. Anything to 
enliven the deadly, dull routine you get on all sides." And 
the girl was right. The beaux of society are ready to 
accept amusement when offered; but with one, or say two 
exceptions, they never dream of providing it; and if they 
but thought a moment, the summer is the very time to re- 
turn the many hospitalities of their lady friends' winter 
entertainments. A fashionable file champetre or old-fash- 
ioned picnic is so easily arranged, so inexpensive, and 
above all, so jolly. Who will take the hint ? 

* * * 

It will go hard if some of the summer campaigning of 
our buds and belles does not bear abundant fruit in ■'an- 
nouncements " for the autumn. Such a gathering of the 
beau monde at any one point was never seen at any of our 
fashionable resorts, if we except the opening season at 
Del Monte, when Charley Crocker made things lively down 
there, as is at present at the Hotel Rafael, and each week 
swells the number. However, Del Monte will get the same 
crowd later on in the summer, and has already its regular 
list of habitual guests who never waver in their allegiance 
to its charms. 

* * * 

The embryo buds of next season's blooming are massing 
their forces down at Del Monte, where a large contingent 
of swell Easterners is looked for in the late summer. 
Castle Crags is hoping for jollity when Colonel Crocker is 
in residence. Since Mayor Phelan has shown a preference 
for the family gathering at Santa Cruz, a large number of 
his lady friends have chosen that place for their summer 
outing. Well, success to their efforts. 

* # # 

The ladies are loud in complaint over the untimely taking 
off of those popular brothers, Callingham and Will Byrne 
— not by death, luckily — but cruel Mrs. Irvine, their 
mother; just, too, as one of them was on the point of a 
plunge into matrimony, said gossip; but perhaps that was 
the cause of the hegira on mamma's part. 

* * * 

"My dear," said a lady who long agoqueened itin social 
circles here, " never name a son after his father. If you 
do, when he marries you will at once become old Mrs. 

So-and-so." 

* * # 

Among the many handsome costumes seen at SantaCruz 
Beach last week, especially beautiful were those worn by 
Miss Emma Butler and Mrs. Thomas Sullivan. 



A whisper from one of the army posts goes that the 
next month or two will see two army weddings here, the 
brides as well as the grooms coming from military life. 

The "Maison Kiche" at the corner of Geary street and Grant 
avenue offers the finest dinner, from 5 to 9 daily, to be had in the 
city. French cooking long ago reached gastronomic perfection, and 
the Maison Riche's reputation- asserts that fact. The best the 
market offers or money can buy waits the patrons of this popular 
restaurant. Fine music, fine wine, and unexcelled service. 



Pore Cosmetics— Professor Wenzell, the Pure Food Chemist, says of 
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vents sunburn and poison oak. Price, 50 cts. 107 Geary street. 

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Finest ouisineand best accommodations. 



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LAKE COUNTY, CAL. 

R. E. WHITEFIELD, 



Manager. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 10, 1897. 



FINANCIAL QUESTIONS. 



Br, K, Saticov, C a 1..— Referring to your favor of June 
, 22nd: First, I will state that at the beginning of our 
Civil War, 1861, the total amount of money in circulation 
was 113.98 per capita. It is now (22.80 per capita. 

\nswering your questions seriatim: (1) What was the 
amount of the first issue of greenbacks'.' 

The first issue of greenbacks was authorized February 
25. 1862, the amount being $150,000,000. The second, 
July 11th, 1862, for the same amount; and a third, March 
3rd, 1863, for a similar amount— or a total in a little over 
one year of (450,000,000. 

What was the amount of gold and silver that these 
greenbacks drove out of circulation? 

1861, before the first issue of greenbacks was author- 
ized, the estimate of the Treasury Department stated the t 
amount of specie in the I'nited States that year as, in 
round figures. 1250,000,000 and a year later, or after the 
first issue of greenbacks, it was estimated at (25,000,000 
or only ten per cent of the original amount. 

Of this matter Professor E. B. Andrews, in his history 
of the United States, says: 

" Finance legislation during the war was more patriotic than wise, 
due partly to necessary haste, largely to ignorance. Millions of 
debt and halt the other economic evil of the war might have been 
saved by doing more to keep the paper dollar on a par with gold. 
Thus the banks should not have been compelled to pay in gold the 
loan of lstil. It forced them to suspend specie payment altogether, 
December .(1st of that year— those o( New korkCity, tirst . followed 
by others everywhere, and by the I'nited states itself. Cold had 
been at a nominal premium all through 1861, but the first recorded 
sale at an advance was on January 13, 1802. It would have been 
better, also, to resort earlier to heavy loans, even at high rales, in- 
stead of Hooding the country with greenbacks. The national banks, 
which were created on purpose to help the sale of Government 
bonds, should have been forced to purchase new bonds instead of 
supplying themselves with bonds already issued, their pnrchase of 
which did the Government no good whatever. Neglect in these re- 
gards caused the paper dollar to fall in value. In July, 1884, it waa 
worth only thirty-five cents in gold." 

What was the amount of Confederate Money issued, 
and was it full legal tender? 

In answer to this question I again quote from Professor 
Andrews' History of the I'nited States: 

"The finances of the Confederacy went steadily from bad to 
worse. Its poor credit forbade large loans. The government had 
to rely mainly upon paper. This soon became almost worthless. 
In December, 1881, it took $120, in paper to buy $100 in gold: in lsiy 
it took $1,900; in 1884 $5,000. 

" Nearly $1 000,000,000 in paper money was issued in all. The 
confederate debt at the close of the war was $2,000,000,000. Under 
the combined influence of depreciated currency and scarcity of 
goods, prices became ludicrously high. As early aa lstiL' Hour was 
$10 a barrel; and salt $1 a pound. Before the war was over a pound 
of sugar brought $76., a spool of thread $20. Of course when the 
leracy collapsed all this paper money became absolutely 
worthless." 

(4) What was the market price of U. S. 4 percent bonds 
and bar silver at the time of Bryan's nomination, and 

(5) What effect did the excitement following this 
event have on these prices '! 

June, 189 I, U. 8. 4 per cent Bonds were, say JUT. 

July, per cent Bonda were, say lis. (average.) 

July, 1»:>7. 1 .v I per cent Bonds were, say 126. 

Jane, 1896, Bar Silver, pure, touched 70 cents per ounce. 

July, 1886, Bar silver, pure, touched 69 ' 

July, 1897, Bar Silver, pure, touched 60 

You will observe that the price of silver was not helped 
by the nomination of Mr. Bryan on a Free Silver Platform, 
while U. S. Bonds depreciated a few points; and that 
since the election and up to the present time silver has 
steadily declined, while U. S. 4 per cent's have increased 
considerably in value. The later decline of silver of *ay 
Is per ounce has doubtless been caused by Japan's 
adoption of the Gold Standard. And here let me remark 
for the consideration of the advocates of silver that in this 
period of a year, while the "White Metal'' has fallen 15 
per cent, wheat has risen 30 per cent. 

Answering the objection persistently raised: "If the 
gold staudard is the best for the people, why is il that the 
banks are all in favor of it ? This query, so often asked, 
is, as you say, based on a misapprehension by the majority 
of people of the nature and real public functions of a bank. 



The answer is : 1st, Gold is an intrinsic equivalent in ex- 
changeable value as a commodity; 2d, Experience— the 
economic sense of the nations transacting the commerce 
of the world— has proven it to be the best standard of 
value; 3d, In the aggregate, four-fifths of all the money 
that the bankers represent belongs to the people, and hence 
in protecting themselves they protect the masses. In 
other words, the banker who pursues rational and con- 
servative methods to avoid or to lessen the danger of 
financial perturbation and disaster, seeks to maintain a 
standard of intrinsic equivalency to protect himself, pri- 
marily, if you please, and also his fellow citizens and pa- 
trons, upon whose favor his prosperity depends. For 
example, roughly speaking, the capital of all banks in 
the United States is 1,250 millions, and of deposits 5,000 
millions, a relation of one to four. If to the capital be added 
accumulated Surplus and undivided profits the relation of 
same to deposits is approximately as one to three. 

In the final analysis, a bank is a protective institution, 
"of the people, by the people, for the people." That is, a 
place for the safe-keeping of the surplus money of one set 
of people in or out of business, with the privilege of making 
it productive to the holder by loan or investment made 
safe by experienced and prudent men in the business. The 
responsibilities of a banker are peculiarly onerous, and in 
commenting on this Walter Bagehot justly remarked : 

" Money (coin) is a commodity much more coveted than common 
goods; for one deceit which is attempted on a manufacturer or a 
merchant many are attenipted on a banker. And besides, a banker, 
dealing with the money of others, and money payable on demand, 
must be always, as it were, looking behind him and seeiDg that he 
has reserve enough in store if payment should be asked for, which 
a merchant, dealing mostly with his own capital, need not think of." 

The wide-spread and seemingly deep-rooted popular im- 
pression that banks are the despoiling agencies of the 
rich, the "gold-bugs," so called, to extort " blood-money " 
from the people at large, is unfounded, as appears when 
one dispassionately considers the facts in regard to their 
operations, especially those of savings banks, which are 
probably the largest lenders to the farming community. In 
1896 there were H88 savings banks in the United States 
that reported to the U. S. Comptroller of Currency, the 
deposits in which amounted to (1,907,156,277, due to 
5,065,494 depositors, probably one-fourth of the adults of 
the country; and the average deposit was only a little 
over s:jH4. These banks are in the fullest sense the peo- 
ple's institutions, the chosen custodians of their cash be- 
longings; and certainly, if it has been deemed by the 
officers of such banks that the gold standard is the best 
for the country, it has only been because of its affording 
the best protection to themselves and their depositors, 
whose mutual interests they administer; for it is from their 
depositors that the banks derive their working funds. The 
savings banks of this city suffered some loss of deposits 
when the silver agitation was at its height last year, be- 
cause a few depositors feared the country might change 
its standard of value. 

I could go on, if the time were at my disposal, and give 
you many facts to show that the dominant reason why the 
banks favor the gold standard is that they have the inter- 
ests of the people at heart. The capital of some of our 
savings banks in this city (the only part that could be 
called exclusively the rich man's portion) does not exceed 
$500,000 each, while their deposits exceed $20,000,000 each; 
therefore it is not the small capital that the officials of 
these banks are chiefly concerned about, but the sum total 
of their various deposits and the interests of the deposi- 
tors — the capital stock under such circumstances taking 
care of itself. 

I may add that one trouble from which farmers suffer in 
the way of high interest is brought on more or less by the 
defective system of note issue in tne United States, insuffi- 
cient local credit facilities, because of many localities being 
left without banks; and under present conditions — thi am- 
ttant menace of fiat money— there is no encouragement to 
start any; consequently, the farmer is obliged to go to 
some private money lender (who may conduct what he 
styles a bank) and borrow money, paying for it a rate 
of interest often exceeding 10 per cent. Then, again, the 
farmer may want an advance on his growing crop, and he 
applies to the " country store-keeper," who possibly sup- 



July 10, 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



>3 



plies the needed money, but at a high rate of interest, 
which yet causes the farmer to feel constrained to buy at 
his store most of the commodities he may need for home 
consumption, on which an increased price likely is charged: 
and, finally, when settlement time comes, the storekeeper 
receives, in addition to two previous brokerages, a com- 
mission on his share of the crops or produce turned over 
in payment of the obligations: the total sum thus exacted 
being usually burdensome and not infrequently ruinous. 
These remarks are not intended to cast any reflections 
upon either the farmer or the storekeeper — but to criticise 
in all fairness a patch-work agglomeration of finance that 
is a disgrace to the Government of the United States, and 
a constant detriment and threat to business. Some re- 
marks of the Honorable Thomas F. Bayard, of Delaware, 
at Philadelphia, yesterday, are so pertinent and admirable 
that I quote them : 

"A disordered currency will confuse and demoralize every (busi- 
ness) transaction in life, great or small, from the payment of daily 
wages of labor to the financial arrangements to carry out the vast 
enterprises. No contract can be safely agreed upon and no business 
can be safely conducted under it or prosper in its company. To 
embark the business and contracts of a country on a currency 
which is not firmly anchored upon a stable standard and measure 
of value is to insure ruin and disaster to every member of society." 

The question of relieving the abnormal situation as 
regards currency is now being discussed by United 
States Treasury officials, and it is hoped a solution may 
be found, but I for one am not over sanguine that Congress 
will effect any genuine and potential reform. However, it 
is semi-officially announced from Washington that the 
President will send a special message to Congress this 
week recommending the creation of a Currency Commis- 
sion to consider a revision of the monetary system of the 
United States. Let us wait and see. 

San Francisco, Cat., July 6", 1897. John J. Valentine.' 



A 



'NEED A BODY CRY V-harhy souainb. 

LL girls must kiss, and smile or frown, 

And be in love, because 
The stern decree is written down 

In nature's changeless laws. 
So here is to the pretty maid 

Who lets her lips meet mine, 
And frankly owns she's not afraid 

To give love's countersign ! 

Ho I ho 1 ho I ho ! I think no less 
Of her who brings me bliss. 
Because 1 know 
She trusts me so; 
I know whom she will kiss? 
Here's to the maiden cold as ice, 

The maid of modesty, 
Why says that "kissing isn't nicel" 
Which means— she won't kiss me 
She kisses some one — that is clear, 

There's some one else who can 
Approach her lips with little fear, 
But I am not the man ! 

Ho 1 ho 1 ho I ho ! the maid of ice 1 
The coy and prim young miss ! 

Without a sign 

I pass her by, 
And think, "Whom does she kiss?" 



WILLIS B. PRY, general agent for the Singer Manu- 
facturing Company, returned to this city last week 
from an extended business trip through Oregon, Washing- 
ton, Idaho and British Columbia. Mr. Pry reports that 
business of all kinds in the North is improviog, crops 
promise well, and the general outlook is encouraging. 
Seattle is looking better and Spokane in particular is 
prospering, owing to the mining interests centering there. 
The manager of the Singer Company expects better times 
this fall throughout the entire Coast. 

Christian Endeavor souvenirs, official medals, pins and badges. 
Sterling silver souvenir spoons from 50 cents up. J. N. Brittain, 
Jeweler, 20 Geary street, near Kearny. 

Up-to-date is every article of gentleman's wear sold by John W. 
Carmany, 25 Kearny street. 

Jackson's Napa Soda kills malaria. 



SECOND-HAND I 

BICYCLES 1 



We want to be rid at once of 
all the second-hand wheels 
We have. All are in good con- 
dition; some are as good as 
new. Kssissessssss 1 s 
There is one sure way to get 
them out--the prices, We 
have made the most tempting 
prices We ever knew on Wheels 
of equal Value. Si SB se 38 SB 



Pope Mfg. 60., Hartford, Conn. 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH: 

344 Post Street. 

GOLDEN GATE PARK BRANCH: 

Renting, Teaching. Storage, Lackers, Baths, 

1970 PAGE. NEAR STANYAN ST. 



ft New 
Policy. 



The Guaranteed Cash Value Policy of 
The Equitable Society contains many 
advantages not offered heretofore by in- 
surance companies. This new policy 
provides for all the benefits of life assur- 
ance and also for life income and invest- 
ment to the holder at the end of a stipu- 
lated period. In event of death of the 
holder, the face value of policy is pay- 
able immediately or may be converted 
into an income for life. Thus, a sure 
provision may be made for protection to 
families, or estates, or incomes, to child- 
ren, or others, in addition to the invest- 
ment for the policy-holder at a later 
period of his life. 



TH6 Equitable 
Lite Assurance 
Society 



of the United States is the strongest and 
best company in the world. 

ASSETS, $216,773,947. SURPLUS, $43,277,179. 

A. M. SHIELDS, Manager. EDWIN CRAMER, Cashier 

Crocker Building, San Francisco, Cal. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 10, 1897. 



A Change 
For the Better. 



The foreign syndicate and exploration 
companies, and the gilt-edged pro- 
moter with millions on tap have left the 
State. For this may the Lord be 
thanked. It took some time for the mine owners to drop 
on their little game, owing to the buncombe which was 
talked and written about their wealth and connections 
abroad, but they got there finally. Outside of the Ponia- 
towski combination, which has done some really service- 
able work for the benefit of the State, and which will un- 
doubtedly prove highly remunerative to the syndicate, we 
would like to ask where the much vaunted exploration 
companies come in, and where have they expended the 
millions so much talked about by parasitical attachments 
on the Coast. Some English and Scotch companies have 
taken hold of our mines in earnest, and have done well, 
but their managers here are not a set of egotistical popin- 
jays, eternally prating about the millions behind them. 
That's where they evidently intend to keep them, judging 
by the California investments, and if the calibre of the 
men is a criterion to go by, the room of both is more de- 
sirable than their company. In their place we have home 
capital coming into the field, a much more desirable state 
of affairs anyway. The "going concern" is now left to its 
owners, a good prospect being more to the purpose of the 
investor who looks to development work for his profits. 
The result is apparent all over the State, business men in 
the interior, as well as the merchants of this city, deriving 
the benefit of an increased trade. Small monied people 
are clubbing together to meet the monthly expense of 
sinking shafts and drifting. Many are bound to succeed 
where a few may fail. In any event the profits will accrue 
to our own people, and not pass into the hands of a few 
promoters, who '.thrive by working the masses abroad 
more than the mines. Many a good mine will before long 
be beard of in California as a result of the development of 
prospects now undertaken by small private companies in 
this city. 

The financial and mining papers of the 
The Spurious old world have inaugurated a crusade 
Mining Expert, which it is to be hoped will clear the 
globe of the fraudulent mining expert. 
It is safe to say that the man who puts M. E. after his 
name, when he knows very well that he has no right to 
the title, is ready to do anything else equally dishonorable. 
Australia and South Africa, which particularly interest 
the British guardians of the investing public, are not the 
only places where the statement applies regarding " bil- 
liard markers, grocers, hair-dressers, policemen, etc.," 
masquerading as mining experts. San Francisco swarms 
with the like, equal if not superior to any other of the des- 
picable frauds compared with. It is high time that some 
action was taken by the State authorities to check a fraud 
of this character by enforcing a law which would compel 
every person professing to be a mining engineer to possess 
a certificate vouching fur his ability and reliability, forfeit- 
able on proof of fraudulent conduct or rascality of any 
kind. Every profession has some protection but that of 
mining, and the result is a general mistrust in everything 
connected with the business, which is becoming more im- 
portant yearly. The State University is now doing good 
work in training young men for the responsible duties of 
the profession, and they should be protected in their 
future from charlatans. How often do we find, upon in- 
gating the careers of men now practicing as full- 
fledged experts, that the only training they have had for 
field work has been a short course of practical assaying 
in some of the local offices, if they have even gone that 
length in an attempt to veneer the sham. There is do 
let nor hindrance, as things go at present, in hanging 
out a shingle as mining engineer, and the consequences 
are patent to every one connected with the business- 
course, the sharp, clear-headed business man is not likely 
to be deceived by a humbug of the kind, while the less cute 
individual, uninitiated in mining, invariably falls a victim to 
the oily, glib-tongued imposter who has "worked his wav 



into his confidence. 



An active business on Pine street dur- 
Pine Street ing the past week, with a livelier move- 
Mining Market, ment in values, has led dealers to hope 

that we are again on the eve of a genuine 
boom in mining stocks. Shares are well concentrated, and 
it is nonsensical to talk about them being in the hands of 
the public. The advance in Sierra Nevada within a few 
days shows what can be done when the manipulators keep 
their hands off and stop checking any strengthening ten- 
dency as it develops in any quarter. There is no telling 
what the new find in Sierra Xevada may amount to just 
yet. A crosscut now started must be extended a distance 
of fifty feet before the ledge is reached. Should the value 
of the ore run higher than it is where cut before, the stock 
will double its present price in short order. A favorable 
report from Alpha, which spoke of 11 feet of $56 ore, 
advanced that stock a few cents, which was speedily lost 
on the news of an assessment. There is something about 
the alleged extent of this ore and the market value of the 
stock which do not jibe someway. If that report is liter- 
ally correct, and not jumbled up through lack of proper 
punctuation, the stock should be worth a good deal more 
than ten or fifteen cents per share from a speculative 
standpoint. The superintendent, Mr. Kyle, is not one to 
intentionally overestimate any discovery, but whether he 
meant that the drift was in eleven feet passing through 
some ore, extent not mentioned, or was fa ore for the en- 
tire distance, is a puzzler for dealers on the street. Yel- 
low Jacket doubled in value on the strength of the state- 
ment that work was to be started up again in the mine. 
The stock is a good one to trade in when the management 
take hold of it for a genuine deal. There is plenty of money 
behind it, and talent, too, if exerted beyond the five-cent 
limit which has been about the size of the game for a time 
past. The North End stocks outside of Sierra Nevada 
have not done much as yet, but they can be depended upon 
for a turn if the movement in the market becomes general. 
Chollar. ia face of a good showing on the 500-level of the 
Brunswick lode, for all the talk of failure, has been unusu- 
ally quiet of late, the stock hanging around eighty cents as 
if it was an orphan. Those who know the mine best are 
more hopeful for its future than ever when crosscutting 
takes place on the b'00-level. This work should begin here to- 
wards the end of the present month and also in 
Con. Virginia ground. Viewed from all points, the 
speculative mining market is not a safe bear proposi- 
lion, and the outlook for a lively spell of trading is 
brighter than it has been for many years past. An active 
market would put money in free circulation again and help 
business of all kinds all over town. 

The Golden Cross mine has found a 
Another Bonanza purchaser at last. Fully equipped, 
Went a-Begging. and producing at the rate of $1,000 
per day, it was hawked about this city 
until the name became common talk in mining circles. 
The savants who rule the destiny of mines in this city, said 
it wasn't worth a cent, and all had their reasons to back 
up the opinion. The same crew sneered the Bullion-Beck 
out of town, and a hundred other valuable propositions 
which the owners, as yet unacquainted with the calibre of 
the local set, thought it their incumbent duty to present 
at this Mecca of mining men on the Pacific Slope. The 
chances are that the Golden Cross will turn out one of the 
biggest bonanza mines on the continent. When a mine is 
turned down by any of the local "buyers," it is a good 
pick up for any outsider. It is either a case of trying to 
'hog the game" or actual incompetency. The "buyer" is 
always on the look out for a ready-made fortune at ten 
cents on the dollar, and will never stop until he finds the 
fool he is looking for— the individual who does not know 
when he has a good enough thing to tie to, waiting for 
some one to relieve him of the responsibility. The original 
owner of the Golden Cross listed his stock on the Ex- 
change at one time, and never even got a nibble at the 
shares, which he finally withdrew, wondering very natur- 
ally why a regular dividend paying investment should get 
the cold shoulder the way it did. He possibly does not 
know yet. An Eastern syndicate, headed by Isaac 
Trumbo of ibis city, is now in possession of the Golden 
Cross property, which will henceforth be run as it should 
be for every dollar in sight. 



July 10, 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»5 




'Hear the Crier :" "Wbn the devil art thou!" 
'One that will play the devil, sir, with you." 



THEODORE Figel is getting fat at the City Jail, cracks 
jokes, and perpetrates witticisms concerning the 
charge of murder which stands against him. He is con- 
fident of release, and sees no reason for apprehension. 
Those who imagine that Figel has real cause for fear 
should take a look at the criminal calendar and history of 
crime as revealed in court records. Figel has money and 
powerful friends. He may safely calculate that death will 
find him respectably in bed, at a hale old age, long before 
the slow machinery of our courts would present bim to the 
consideration of the hangman, or the gates of San Quentin 
abbreviate his liberty upon the mere charge of having 
killed his employer. 

THE unspeakable cad who distinguished himself by de- 
serting a family and taking unto his cowardly bosom 
another man's wife, stated in court this week that he was 
very particular about the spelling of his name. It is a pity 
that his fastidiousness does not extend to his morals. It 
is many a year since this bald-headed despoiler of homes 
was baptized Wriothesley, the Christian (?) cognomen of 
which he is so punctiliously proud, but were he now to 
be sprinkled anew, even distilled water would show its dis- 
approval by turning straightway to mud. 

MORE than the usual list of accidents and fatalities 
followed in the wake of this week's Glorious Fourth 
demonstrations in San Francisco. If a man have not his 
life insured in these days of death-dealing bombs, un- 
loaded guns, and wrought-iron mortars, warranted to ex- 
plode and kill at three hundred feet, it would seem that 
the only safe way to tide over the anniversary alive is to 
spend the day musing on a rock at the Farallones, or com- 
mune with the seagulls on Goat Island. 

AN Oakland church is evidently an unsafe place for 
portable property. Last Sunday a lady worshiper 
was minus her watch when she emerged from a Presby- 
terian edifice, and a letter carrier, whose horse and cart 
were bitched to a church post during the evening service, 
had to hoof it home, his turn-out having disappeared. It 
is hoped, however, that Oaklanders will not remain away 
from the fount of grace through fear of being stood up by 
anything of a more predatory nature than the contribu- 
tion box. 
IN the interests of outraged poetry, it is to be earnestly 
hoped that the assault upon the Muse, of which J. W. 
Dutton, of Oakland, is guilty in bis Grand Chorus com- 
posed for the Endeavorers, may be his last offense. Dut- 
ton is doubtless a good man, but as a poet his crime is un- 
pardonable. That chorus would give even Pegasus the 
blind staggers. 

THE churches have all been in full blast this week, and 
San Francisco has offered so little encouragement to 
Satan that the disgusted emissary from Hades, finding 
the roads effectually blockaded by Christian-loaded trains, 
has gone via his private underground route to Chicago, to 
see if C. O. Brown is attending faithfully to business at 
the new stand. 

THE daily papers seem to be relenting towards Mrs. 
Bradbury, whom they lately accused of all kinds of 
unmentionable deviltries. Now they call her "a giddy 
girl," "a thoughtless child," etc. If this is the correct 
attitude to take towards the heroine of the unsavory es- 
capade, the correct punishment would be a good spanking. 

" UOW the Gospel Came to San Francisco" is the in- 
Xl teresting title to a long article explanatory of the 
subject in a morning contemporary, but the journal fails 
to chronicle how or why the gospel manages to keep in 
such inactive retirement around these parts a large per- 
centage of the time. 

THERE is lamentation among the minions of the law 
because Welburn is found. They were having a 
lovely time hunting for him in the tenderloin. 



TO travelers this way we fling 
A warning danger signal out; 
Produce certificate and ring 

Or else omit us front your route. 
No more the glassy overlook 

We'll give to guilty couples frail, 
But with the stern law's grappling hook 

Will laud such flying fish in jail. 
A vaunt, elopers I Pass us by. 
None but the married need apply. 

THE cloak of religion is being donned in many unex- 
pected quarters just now, aud the christian en- 
deavors of some well known sinners who are trying, by a 
lavish display of purple and gold about their front doors, 
to entice our Eastern visitors in to buy their goods, either 
dry goods or wet goods, must have been commendably un- 
assuming since we have none of us ever heard of them be- 
fore. But all is fair in love and war — or business. 

ACTOR RATCLIFFE, who nearly beat his wife to death, 
has given himself up and will be tried for his brutali- 
ties. It will be necessary to await the outcome of the 
trial before arrangements for his starring tour can be 
completed, but it is expected that by next season he will 
be free to accept one of the many flattering offers he has 
received from theatrical managers. His success is a fore- 
gone conclusion. 

WINE and women, the customary companions of man's 
downfall, are said to be responsible for the present 
predicament of O. M. Welburn, Collector of Internal 
Revenue at this unhappy port. It is about time that this 
hackneyed excuse were done away with, and the blame 
shifted where it necessarily belongs, namely, to the 
shoulders of him who obtains the public trust, only to 
abuse it. 

IT has been said that heaven is here on earth, also hell; 
and no one denies the truth of the latter part of the 
statement. Chicagoans emphatically assert that Satan's 
empire is situated in San Francisco but the hot weather 
they have been lately suffering from seems to pi'ove that 
they are as mistaken in their geography as they are in a 
good many other things. 

THE Smiths have lately been illustrating the theory of 
inherited weaknesses (the Jessie Street Smiths, not 
the others). The daughter was locked up on a charge of 
jabbing — she stuck a waiter with her hat pin — and when the 
mother came to the prison in a state of intoxication to see 
what the row was, she was locJ-ed up on a charge of 
jabbering. 

FOR the time being, San Francisco's peccadilloes are 
eclipsed by the wayward actions of her southern 
sister, Los Angeles. With a scandal in high life, and a 
deputy sheriff playing the role of a seducer, the enter- 
prising capital to the south of us is strictly in the 
municipal swim. 

THE Society for the Suppression of Vice has received 
much commendation for its prompt action in arresting 
Russell Ward and Mrs. Bradbury. It is interesting to re- 
mark that the first man this worthy institution has 
thought fit to make an example of in a case of this kind is 
a foreigner. 

THE Sunday Editor of the Examiner lately wrote an 
article in which he scored the people of San Francisco 
for not encouraging local writers of fiction. Presumably 
he would have all the other papers follow the example of 
his own, and employ none but writers of fiction. 

WILLIAM MARYLAUF of San Francisco has dis- 
covered a most successful cure for insomnia, a malady 
from which he had suffered for some time. The process 
was simple and the effect instantaneous. He merely 
killed himself. 

KNOWING how rickety San Francisco is in its morals, 
it is with some apprehension that the Town Crier 
looks forward to the coming of "The Twelve Temptations" 
at the Columbia Theatre in September. 

ANOTHER decree has been rendered that threatens 
the fortune of the fair little widow Hinckley. Ban- 
quo's ghost isn't in it with the restless shade of the late 
millionaire Blythe. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 10, 1897. 




A MARRIAGE A LA MO DE--***** b. smith. 

a HABBIAOB A I. A 

Have you heard what they are saying 

O'er the walnuts and the wine, 

Crete eagerly betraying 

About your atfairs and mine? 
Foes and friends receive attention 

each chatting beau and belle, 
And they casually mention 

That Marie has •"married well." 

" Married well!" Ah, that's expressive, 

And from it we understand 
That the bridegroom has excessive 

store ol ducats at command. 
Is he good? He has his vices. 

Has he brains? We scarce can tell. 
Handsome? Hardly! It sutlices, 

If Marie has married well. 

M she love him? Love's a passion, 

Childish in this latter day. 
She will dress in height of fashion, 

And her bills he'll promptly pay. 

Does he love her'.' Wildly, madly ! 

lOe he bought bifl trotter, Nell, 

He has welcomed naught as gladly ; 

Yes, Marie has married well. 
Is she happy? That's a trifle; 

Happiness la bought and sold; 
Ami -lie readily can stille 

Love she used to know of old. 
Well she knows a heart is broken ; 

As for hers— she cannot tell ; 
lut her bridal vows are spoken, 

And Mane has married well. 
In this game one should give heeding 

To the stakes, not gentle arts ; 
And, when diamonds are leading, 

Where's the use of playing hearts'.' 
I congratulate her gladly ; 

But the wish I can't dispel 
That most girls may marry badly, 

If Marie has married well. 



MOLLY — F. t. STANTON. IN SOUTH£RN MAGAZINE. 

If Molly's eyes would shine for me, 
I'd give the sun fair warnin' 

He needn't rise to Light my skie-, 
uiae the beam er Molly's eyes 
Would make my mornin'. 

If Molly's lips was red for me 

In weather sad or sunny ; 
1 M say to every bazxln 1 bee: 
" You needn't rob the rose for me— 

Her lips is honey '. " 
If Molly's heart would beat for me 

hear it, 
I'd give leastways, my part. 

Fer jes' the beat er Molly's heart, 

An' my heart near it! 



GOOD-BY.— CTHELWYN W£THIRIA0- 

Good-by, my love; though multitudes of years 
And miles and faces come between us twain, 
Though I should never hear your voice again, 

Mill are you mine, mine, mine! Not by my tears— 

You never made them How; nor by my fears, 
For 1 was fearless born; but by the rain 
Of joys that turned to seas of sunny grain 

This heart that showed aforetime Blender spears. 

Now on my rlouded day of life shall 1 

No loss. The streams of gold that poured from suns 
1 an have turned to jrold this harvest heart; 
I am all sunlight-colored, and the sum 
uf bygone happiness th&t through me runs 

Will make you mine forever, though apart. 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 



RESTAURANTS. 
Bergez's Restaurant. Academy Building, S32-SS1 Pine street, below Mont- 
gomery. Rooms for ladies and families; private entrance. John Bergez 

-tor. 
Malson Tortoni, French Rotlsserie, 111 O'Farrell street. Private dining 

rooms and banquet ball. S. Constantln!, Proprietor. 
Poodle Dog Restaurant, S. E. cor. Grant ave. and Bush St. Private 
dining and banquet rooms, Tel. 429. A. B. Blanco & B. Buns. 

DENTISTS. 
Dr. Franklin Pancoast removed to 20 O'Farrell street, rooms 16, 17 & 26 

MEDICAL. 
Or. Hall. 14 McAllister St.. near Jones. Diseases o f women and ohlldren 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 606 Market street. 
Selections on approval: any place in world. W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan 
The W. H. Hollls Stamp Co., (Incorporated). 106 O'Farrell St., S. F. 

BOILER MAKERS. 
P. F. Dundon's San Francisco Iron Works, 314, 316, and 318 Main street. 
Iron Work of every description designed and constructed. 

CANDIES. 
Maillard's Chocolates in Vj and Mb boxes. Roberts 1 , Polk and Busb. 

LADIES' HAIR DRESSING. 
Hermann Schwarze (known us Hermann at Strozynskl's) has opened 
Ladies* Hair Dressing Parlors at 211 Powell st. Telephone Main 5820 



BANKING. 



Bank of British Columbia. 

Southeast Cor. Bush and Sansome Sts. 
Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

Capital Paid Up I3.000.a0 

Reserve Fund * 500.000 

HEAD OFFICE 60 Lombard STREET, LoNDON 

Branches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster. Kamloops, Nan- 
lamo, Nelson, Saudon, and Kaslo, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available In all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago— First National Bank; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland — British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company oi 
Sydney, Ld; Dkmekaka and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

The flnglo-Galifornian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized 16,000,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 

Paid Dp 1,600,000 

Reserve Fund 700,000 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansohe Sts 
Head Office— is Austin Friars. London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co.. 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART I „..._„. 

P. N. LILIENTHAL f Managers 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

No. 526 California Street. San Francisco 

Guarantee capital and surplus $2,040,201 66 

Capital actually paid up iu cash.. 1.000000 00 

Deposits December 31. 1806 27,720,947 45 

OFFICERS: President, B.A.Becker; First Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstmau; Cashier, A. H. R Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary. George Tourny; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. Mulier: Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: B A Becker. Daniel Meyer. H- Horst- 
maon. Jgn. Stefnbart, N. Van Bergen, E. Rohte, H B. Russ, D N. 
Walter undN. Oblundt 

Wells Faroo & Go.'s Bank. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets 

John J. Valentine President 

Homer S. King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier 

F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

Cash Capital and Surplus 16,250,000 

BRANCHES. 
N.Y.City.H. B Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City. J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eld ridge, Henry 

E. Huntington. Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles 

F. Crocker, Dudley Evano. 

Security Savings Bank. 

j-j--' Montgomery St.. Mills Building 
interest paid on deposits. 

LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 
William Alvord S L. Abbott. Jr. H.H.Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O D Baldwin E J. McCutchen 

Adam Grant W.S.Jones J.B.Lincoln 



July 10, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'7 







BANKING. 



Weaned Father — They sav that no matter how one 
suffers some one has suffered more. All the same, they 
couldn't beat me in this business, for I walked this child 
last night for fully six hours. JIothek (calmly) — 
Yes, George, dear; but suppose you lived up near the 
Pole, where the nights are six months long. — Collier's 
Weekly. 

Bacon — That's a bright youngster of Flannigan's. 
EGBERT— What's he done now? "Why, he saw his father 
milking the goat the other night." "Yes?" "And what 
do you suppose he asked him?" "I'm sure I don't know." 
"He asked if he was trying to get bock beer." — Youkers 
Statesman. 

She — I do so love the sea. He — It reminds me of my- 
self. "How ridiculously egotistical!" "No. It is a sad 
fact. Just look at those waves. They come in with a 
great roll and go broke when they hit the shore. So do I." 
— Cincinnati Enquirer. 

" So that young man says he would lay his fortune at 
your feet?" said Mabel's father. "Yes." "But he 
hasn't done so." "N-no." "And perhaps you can tell 
why ? " "I guess, father, that he hasn't had it told yet." 
— Washington Star. 

''Mrs. Meeker,'' observed a friend of the family, "is a 
very superior woman. She can converse intelligently, I 
believe, on a thousand different topics." "Yes," sighed 
Mr. Meeker. "And she does." — Chicago Journal. 

"I told her I was afraid to kiss her while we were on the 
tandem, for fear we would both fall off." "What did she 
say?" "She said she hoped I didn't call myself an exper- 
ienced wheelman." — Chicago Record. 

"See here. That horse you sold me runs away, bites, 
strikes, and tries to tear down the stable at night. You 
told me that if I got him once I wouldn't part with him for 
$1000." "Well, you won't."— Ex. 

"Well, there is one thing to be proud of; we have no 
class prejudices in this country." "I guess you were 
never around when three or four sophomores got hold of a 
freshman." — Washington Star. 

"Do you know," said the man who was going to have a 
tooth pulled, "I don't think 'dental parlor' is a good 
phrase." "No?" "Drawing room would be much better." 
— New York Journal. 

a man was explaining to his wife how the telephone 
worked. "It is wonderfully simple; all you have to do is 
to grasp the apparatus with one hand and talk with the 
other."— Tit- Bits. 

Wife — You snored awfully last night, my dear. Husband 
— Humph! Why didn't you wake me up? Wipe — Because 
I prefer snoring to profanity, darling.— New York Even- 
ing Journal. 

"1 can't understand why she wears such fearfully loud 
clothes." "Maybe it's so she can't hear the things people 
say about her." — Chicago Journal. 

NEW SAFE-DEPOSIT VAULTS. 



Safes $4.00 to $150.00 Per Annum.— The Union Trust Com- 
pany's new safety vaults, corner of Market and Montgomery streets, 
are the strongest, beat guarded, and best lighted in the city. 
Superior accommodation for its patrons. Ladies will find apart- 
ments for their exclusive use. The company transacts a general 
banking, trust, and savings business, and acts a executor, adminis- 
trator, trustee, and as custodian of wills, and consults as to trust 
matters without charge. 

Valuables of all kinds taken on storage. 

All the good judges hold that J. F. Cutter whiskey is one of the 
best and most popular brands of liquor manufactured in the world. 
Its sale in this city and throughout the entire country is enormous, 
and is steadily increasing. E. Martin & Co., Ill Market street, are 
sole agents for the Pacific Coast. 



All sensible people drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



California Safe Deposit and Trust Company.. 

Cor. California and Montgomery Sts. 

Capilal Fully Paid $1,000,000 

Transacts a general banking business 
and allows interest on deposits payable on demand or after notice. 

Acts as Executor, Administrator, aod Trustee under wills or in any 
other trust capacity. Wills aro drawn by the company's attorneys and 
are taken care of without charge. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES to rent at prices from $5 per annum up- 
ward according to size, and valuables of all kinds are stored at low rates. 

Directors: J. D. Fry, Henry Williams, I. G. Wlckersham. Jacob C. 
Johnson, James Treadwell, F. W. Lougee. Henry F.Fortmann, R B.Wal- 
lace. R. D. Fry, A, D. Sharon, and J. Dal?.ell Brown. 

Officers: J. D Fry, President; Henry Williams. Vice-President; R. 
D. Fry, Second Vice-President; J. Dalzell Brown, Secretary and Treas- 
urer; E E, Shotwell, Assistant Secretary; Gunnison, Booth & Bartnett, 
Attorneys. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San FrancisGo. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, 
Mechanics' Institute Buh.dino 

Guaranteed Capital 81.000,000 

Paid-Up Capital 8 300,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President. S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 

JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 
Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James Mofflt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert MoElroy, 
and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange 
on City Banks, When opening accounts send signatuie. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits. Dec. 31, 1805 824,^02,327 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1,575,631 

ALBERT MILLER, President | E. B. POND, Vice-President 
Directors— Thomas Magee, G. W. Beaver, Philip Barth, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fremery, George C. Boardman, Robert Watt; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 
pass-book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9. A. m. to 3 p. m. Saturday even- 
ings, 6:30 to 8. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited. 

N.W. Cob. Sansome & Suttee Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 

Paid Up Capital 12,000,000 

ReserveFund ( 860,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

AGENTS— New York— Agency ol the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, FrereB 
& Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal oities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. l3REENEBAuMl M . M .. rR 
C. ALTSCHUL J- Managers. 

Crocker- Woolworth National Bank ol S. F. 

Corner market, Montgomery, 

and Post Streetb. 

Paid-Up Capital 11,000,000 

WM. H. CROCKER..., : President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W.KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Chas. F. Crocker, E. B. Pond, Hy. J. Crocker, Geo. W. Scott 

The Sather Banking Company. 

Successor to Sather & Co. 

Established 1851, San Francisco. 

CAPITAL 81,000,000 

James K.Wilson President. Albert Miller, Vice-President 

L. I. Co wqill. Cashier. F. W. Wolfe, Secretary. 

Dlreotors— C. S. Benedict, E G. Lukens, F. W. Sumner, Albert Mil 
ler Wm.P. Johnson, V. H. Metcalf, James K. Wilson. 

Agents : New York— J. P. Morgan & Co. Boston— National Bank of the 
Commonwealth. Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago — Continental Na- 
tional Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First Na- 
tional Bank. London— Brown, Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co 

Bank of California, San FranGisco. 

Capital and Surplus, $6,000,000 

WILLIAM ALVORD President | CHARLES R. BISHOP. . Vice-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith.... Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. Moulton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

New York— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N.B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston— The Tremont Na- 
tional Bank; Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Union National 
Bank. Philadelphia— National Bank of the Republic. St. Louis— Boat- 
man's Bank. Virginia City (Nev.)— Agency of The Bank of California. 
London— Messrs. N. M.Rothschild & Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Roths- 
child Freres. Berlin— Direction der Disconto Gesellschaft. China, 
Japan and East Indies— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China. 
Australia and New Zealand — The Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and 
Bank of New Zealand. 

Letters of Credit issued available In all parts of the world. 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 10, 1897. 




HOME DECORATION- 

SOFA pillows nowadays are not made to look at. They 
are of all sizes, covered with al! kinds of material; 
they are embroidered or not, are frilled and unfrilli 
cording to the fancy of the owner; but one and all are in- 
tended for ease and comfort. There should always be one 
or two large ones filled with feathers or hair which will 
offer a decided resistance to pressure, as well as the fluffy 
light down ones, which answer admirably for the super- 
structure, but are too unsubstantial for the foundation of 
the luxurious nest one builds up on the corner of the divan. 

The coverings present an opportunity for most artistic 
Mendings of the different shades and tones of the 
color scheme of the room. Two or three should be of 
plain material of the darkest shade employed in the other 
furnishings, to give relief to the eye; and no color, however 
in itself, should be used which does not harmonize 
with everything else in the room. 

An authority on such subjects asserts that public halls, 
school rooms and work rooms should be ventilated from 
the bottom, the impure air being pumped out from below, 
and the warm air allowed to descend from the top. It 
would then seem that when we open a window from the 
top we do not ventilate so much as cool a room. We, as a 
rule, ventilate too suddenly. When the air is close or the 
room too warm it is generally sufficient to raise the lower 
sash just so far that the lower edge is exactly on a level 
with the sill. The draught is not perceptible and there is 
a constant accession of fresh air both from the lower and 
upper edge of the sash. 

To the importance of one branch of the subject, how 1 
the modern architect is not yet sufficiently alive. He 
gives us ventilating pipes in abundance, and painstakingly 
places the bath room on the sunny side of the house, with 
an outside window, but dress and lined closets, with few 
exceptions remain unlighted and unaired. Every dress 
closet should have, if not an opening into the outer air, at 
least a window into the hall through which a current of 
air can be forced occasionally. The danger from moths 
and li s is immensely diminished thereby, and 

one's clothing can be kept much fresher than in a 1 
from which light and air arc shut out. Every one knows 
the odor of a garment which has been shut up for any 
length of time. Dressing wrappers, bath gowns and gar- 
is worn at night should never bo hung in a closet or 
armoir at all, but in an open press in bath or dressing 
room 

There are various forms of insect life which aie a great 
hindrance to the ease and pleasure of house-keeping. 
Fortunately, however, there are various ways of lighting 
them. The waxed floors and consequent frequent u 
oil and turpentine are great discouragers of moths, buffalo 
> and roaches. It would be a great . ■ if all 

closet floors were oiled and waxed also. Open plum 
has done away with the hiding places of roaches 
however, can entirely free the house of these pest 
perfect neatness and constant watchfulness. The country 
housekeeper has also, in addition to lighting these insects, 
the further struggle with ants, both black and red. Per- 
haps the most efficient preventive of all three is powi. 
borax. Freely scattered in the blanket chest it will keep 
out moths, and if put under the papers on the kit 
storeroom shelves will effectually guard provisions from 
ants and roaches. It is also of great use in keeping a 
house free from mice. Ants and roaches will not cross 
soap, a thing not generally known. 

Sugar boxes and barrels placed on soap cakes and 
isolated from contact with the wall are perfectly secure 
from any Insects 

Our Eastern friends, the Christian Endeasorera will nol be a 
their jonrnej to Japan; but they rim getaapli 
Japanese ait goods, curios, carvings and tapestrie b 
store of (;eor K e T. Marsh & Co., at 625 Market street, under ihe 
Palace Hotel. 

Other waters try— Jackson's Napa Soda gets there. 



OUR GREAT 



vtoc/c- TJaking 
Sacrifice dale *&> 

NOW IN PROGRESS. 
EVERYTHING AT. 



J'orcinff-out ^Prices. 

See Daily Papers for Particulars. 




MURPHY BUILDING, Market and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

203 to 207 N Spring St. bet. Temple and First St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

UNITED STATES 
LAUNDRY. 



Telephone South 420. 



Office, 1004 Market Street. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Tel. Bush 12 



Lft GRANDE LAUNDRY, 

FBDOIIU Or kick-*! Powell street, opp. Baldwin Hotel. 

Branch — II Taylor street, near Golden Gate avenue. 
_ „ Laundry— Fell streets, between Folsom and Howard. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



Sells Burial Lots 
and Graves. 
Perpetual Care. 



LAUREL HILL 

Cemetery 
Association 



Junction of Bush 
street and 
Central avenue, 
San Francisco. 



DR. BYRON W. HAINES 



14 Grant Avenue 
Rooms 16-17-18-19 



Dentist 



over "Gity of Paris.' 



DR. ARTHUR T. REGENSBURGER, 

Dentist, 

Office ami Residence, 409", Post street, San Francisco. 

Office Hours, u tn tax. si.; l to 5 p m. Telephone Clay 84 



Dr. F. G. PAGUE 

Dentist 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy or Sciences Building, 



519 Market street 





5 



July 10. 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



INSURANCE 

THE Mutual Reserve Fund Life of Now York has a 
branch operated here under the management of Gen- 
era) Auditor Donald E. Cameron, who has just sent out a 
- circular letter advising Californians to spend their insur- 
ance money at home. The application of this advice is 
not clear, inasmuch as the company's head office is in New 
York. 

Clarence M. Smith, of the Northwestern, goes East en 
the 12th to attend the meeting of the company's agents, 
which is held yearly at Milwaukee. 

Agents of the Fidelity Mutual Life of Philadelphia are 
circulating a letter signed by Commissioner Lambert, of 
Pennsylvania, stating that the strictures on assessment 
companies contained in his report for 1896 do not refer 
to that company, although at that time most insurance 
men supposed that the strictures referred to were 
directed particularly to that company. 

The Metropolitan has absorbed the United States In- 
dustrial. 

The Bankers' Life of New York, and the Provident Sav- 
ings Life are both out with new policies. 

The life insurance companies of New York State have 
on deposit in the different banks over $12,000,000 which is 
earning no interest. 

Following the incorporation of the English company to 
insure against the loss of umbrellas, Chicago organizes a 
company to insure against the loss of cats. 

The Equitable Life assurance Society has withdrawn 
from Austria, owing to the persistent opposition of the 
Government, expressed in adverse and embarrassing 
legislation. 

Mr. McNall, of Kansas, has in the courts of his own 
State found an obstacle in the way of his purpose to run 
the insurance department for political effect. 

Herbert Folger, manager for the Coast of the Aachen 
and Munich, has perfected an organization in Washington, 
which is approved by the State Auditor. 

The Frankfort Accident and Plate Glass Insurance 
Company will hereafter do an individual accident business 
in this country. Voss, Conrad & Co., of this city, United 
States managers, have established headquarters in Chi- 
cago, where Mr. Voss is at present located. 

The International Association of Accident Underwriters 
were in annual session at Put-in-Bay, New York, last 
week. 

Commissioner Merrill, of the Massachusetts Insurance 
Department, declines an invitation to join with the New 
York Department in examining the Globe Fire Insurance 
Company. 

Two new Pennsylvania companies are the Angelica 
Mutual Fire, of Angelica, and Penn Mutual Fire, of Rock- 
wood. 

Colonel Wm. Smedburg has returned from a two months' 
absence in Washington. 

Colonel C. W. Stone has been made secretary of the 
Select Life and Accident Company of Denver. 

Vice-President Wm. J. Dutton, of the Fireman's Fund, 
is in New York. 



THE auction of von Rhein & Co., to be held Thursday, 
July 15th, is out of the ordinary in this, — that all lots 
are of a generous size, none less than 35 feet frontage, and 
the corners none less than 50 feet frontage. The reason 
which has led the auctioneers to make this innovation is 
that the property faces the Pacific Ocean, is just east of 
Sutro Heights, and has an inspiring marine view. Such a 
locality never fails to attract buyers who can afford to 
erect fine homes. Indeed, in every city of the world sites 
commanding marine view are sought after for homes of 
the cultured and wealthy. The terms are £ cash remainder 
in 1, 2, 3 years. 
Already the auctioneers report an active inquiry. 

$25 Rate to Chicago via the Great Santa Fe Route. 
The low rates made for Christian Endeavorers will be open to the 
public as well, if they travel via the Great Santa Fe Route. Ticket 
Office, 644 Market street, Chronicle Building. Tel. Main 1531. 



Drink Jackson's Napa Soda before breakfast. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO, 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 

309 and 311 Sansome St. • San Francisco, Ca 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAY, DURHAM & BRODIE 48 and 46Threadneedle St., London 

SIMPSON, M ACKIRDY & CO 29 South Castle St., Liverpool 

INSURANCE. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 



Firemans Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,500,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California St., S. F. 

Fibe Insurance. 

Founded A. D. 179?. 

Insurance Gompanu of Nortn America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital (3,000,000 

Surplus to Polioy Holders 5,033,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. F. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up 11,000,000 

Assets 3,300.018 

Surplus to Polioy Holders 1.668,332 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager 501 Montgomery St. 

B. J. Smith, Assistant Manager. 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 501 Montgomery St 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Established 1732. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON NSURANCE CO. incorporated m» 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, 

413 California St., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., LIMITED, 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital 16,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 

No. 316 California St., S. P 

THE THURING'A INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Of ERFUUT, GERMANY. 
Capital, J2.250.000 Assets, 110,984.248. 
Paciflo Coast Department; 2C4-208 SANSOME ST., S. F. 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO.. General Managers. 

TUP I IflM FIRE INSURANCE CO . Limited, of London. 
InC LIUN Total cash assets in United States, J88 ,79709 
TUC IMDEQIAI INSURANCE CO Limited, of London. 
Inc. MVIrLnlHL Established on Pacific Coast in lt-52 

WILLIAM J LAN HERS Resident Manager. 
Pacific Coast Branch: 205-207 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 10, 1897. 



THE COMPLETED ROTUNDA. 




Ci'.M.MKMiiHATlYi: BXKBCISE8, Momdat, Jri.v 12, 1887. 

THE completion of the New City Hall rotunda and dome 
are well worthy the exercises with which the con- 
tractors upon this splendid municipal improvement have 
determined to signify that fact. The great work which 
was undertaken but one year ago has been steadily carried 
forward and today stands completed — at once a tribute to 
the wealth of California's native resources and an endur- 
ing monument to the commissioners who ordered it, the 
architect whose genius designed its beautiful proportions, 
and the workmen whose skill wrought it. Gleaming mar- 
ble, beaten copper, stained glass, and enduring wood have 
all contributed to this splendid entrance to the City Hall; 
and their combination from the wide floor to the arching 
dome 1411 feet above, produce a harmony of coloring and a 
mellow blending of light that gratifies the eye and delights 
the artistic testes. 

In this completed work the industry and products of 
California find a fitting and a harmonious place; for the 
commissioners, Harry T. Creswell and 
William Broderick. wisely determined that 
the materials and the artisans of this 
State should be first represented in the 
work they had in hand. By their timely 
aid splendid marble quarries have been 
opened, their product advertised, and the 
investment of capital encouraged. 

It has been determined to call this com- 
: work the Shea Dome, for the reason 
that its i:rand proportions, beautiful lines, 
and effective blending of grace and streugth, 
are due to the technical and practical 
knowledge of Mr. Frank T. Shea, of Shea & 
architects. Whatever division of 
opinion may have been originally enter- 
1 as to the exterior or interior archi- 
tecture of this, the city's greatest building, 
its grand lines and impressive cha: 
have conclusively answered. The Shea 
Dome will be an enduring and deserved 
monument to its able designer and builder. 
The chief contractor for 

San Francisco the rotunda was the San 
Novelty and Francisco Novelty and 

Plating Works. Plating Works, at 68 to 

71 First street, this city. 

who did the construction work, all orna- 



mental, metal work and color decorations. This included 
the furnishing of all railings, balustrades, bases and cap- 
itals of columns, ornamental ribs of the dome and lantern, 
and entire work on the grand stair case, much of which is 
copper, hammered and pressed — the first of its kind in the 
city. The company has in this work shown itself abreast 
of the craft in the world. Until recently it would have 
been impossible to have gotten the finished material used 
in this contract on this Coast. It has always been imported. 
The entire work of the company has been done in the most 
satisfactory and artistic manner, at a contract price of 

I. 

The first floor, or lower rotunda, is noted 

Travertine by the great display of beautiful marbles, 
Ma.oie. which rise in polished wainscoting to a height 
of 13 feet above the floor. This material 
comes from the celebrated Travertine Quarry situated in 
Mono County, with offices at 2S Eighth street, this city. 
The contract for this beautiful line of work amounted to 
$16,000, and represents 5,000 square feet of marble— the 
first output of that valuable quarry, elegantly polished 
and exactly set. This company also had the contract for 
the first floor of th? rotunda, 3,000 square feet laid in 
ceramic tiling five times as hard as marble and of artistic 
design, the price of which was $3,000. The work of this 
company has been beautifully done, and it is particularly 
noteworthy as being its first large contract, and the first 
appearance of Travertine marble in the market. 

The flooring of all the galleries, all 

Wm. H McCotmick stepping, and the platforms of the 
grand stair case are laid in white 
veined marble from the Amador Quarries, of which Wm. 
II. McCotmick, 115 City Hall avenue, is the representa- 
tive in this city. This marble is very rare and is superior 
to the Italian. The wainscoting of the second gallery is 
particularly beautiful, being a rich shade of green, is 5J 
feet in height, representing more than 2.000 square feet. 
The color effect of this marble is extremely pleasing and 
adds greatly to the general tone of the interior. It may 
be said that this is also a new product of the State, and 
comes from the Kimball Quarry in San Diego County, of 
which Mr. McCormick is the agent here. 

The great ornamental feature of 
Pacific American the rotunda is doubtless the dome, 

Decoration Company, composed entirely of art glass set 
in beautiful design and harmonious 
colorings. This permits of a multitude of light effects 
which would be impossible with the ordinary plaster and 
fresco materials. Above the dome is an immense lantern, 
from which many electric lights will pour forth a flood of 
mingling colors upon the whole rotunda beneath. This 
splendid covering, exceeding 4,000 square feet, at a con- 
tract price of (22,000 (which is the largest contract for art 
glass ever made), is the work of the Pacific American 




Rotunda-First and Second Galleries. 



July 10, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTKR. 




Frank T. Shea. 



Decorative company, office at 26 O'Farrell street, with 
factories at lit Kremontandllo Eighth streets. The stained 
glass and art windows were also the work of this well-known 
and completely equipped establishment. This was the 
largest single contract ever let for art glass work, and 
was executed in the very highest style of the art. 

All the carpenter work, which con- 
> Jamet F. Leahy, sists of heavy antique quartered oak: 
all the frames, doors and windows, and 
all the painting and interior, are by contractor James F. 
Leahy, of Leahy Bros., whose offices are 50."> Parrott 
Building. The color decorations have been done in a most 
artistic manner, and add materially to the substantial as 
well as ornamental appearance of the rotunda. 

Much credit is due to the expert on 
Joseph McKenna. decorations, Joseph McKenna, who 
was appointed by the Commissioners 
as superintendent of that important part of the work. 
His good taste and excellent judgment have been shown 
with admirable effect and demonstrate the wisdom of the 
Board. 

One of the beautiful, dis- 
tinctive features or the ro- 
tunda is the grand stair- 
case which leads from the 
lower floor to the galleries 
above. It is constructed 
in a circular space thirty- 
five feet in diameter, and 
approached by spacious 
marble steps which lead 
to wide landing places, 
from either side of which 
stairways lead to the 
upper gallery and various 
halls of the main building, 
and supported by eight 
graceful columns on the 
first landing and fifteen 
columns on the third. From these last spring arches, form- 
ing the base of an artistic dome of ornamental art glass. 
The half-tones presented in this issue of the News Let- 
ter give an idea of the rich and beautiful appearance of 
this grand rotunda and its dome. Interesting exercises 
will take place on next Monday afternoon at 2 p. m. and at 
8 o'clock in the evening, at the City Hall rotunda; and a 
really splendid musical programme has been arranged. 

BLYTHEDALE is hidden in the beautiful redwoods of 
Marin County, just on the skirt of Mill Valley, and 
but a step from the Tamalpais Scenic Railway. A 
lovely spot; a hotel with every accommodation for the 
transient or permanent guest; convenient and picturesque 
cottages for families; electric lights and tables furnished 
with every luxury that the season affords. Blythedale is 
not quite sixty minutes out of the city — a fine ride by boat 
and rail. Mrs. Gregg, well-known as a lady of much ex- 
perience, gives her personal attention to the wants of 
every guest. 

HIRSCH & KAISER, successors to Hirsch & Kahn, at 
7 Kearny street, have one of the handsomest stores 
in the city. Their stock of optical goods and photographers' 
supplies, kodaks, etc., are all the finest, most varied, and 
latest manufactured. Careful and scientific examination 
for defective sight free, and glasses skilfully fitted. The 
firm is strictly up-to-date in every respect, and is doing a 
fine business. 

" /"*> OLDEN Gate Villa," a sporting and pleasure re- 
vd sort, has just been opened by Robert D. Hagerty 
and Chas. Leonhardt, Jr., at ocean beach, just below the 
Cliff House. The place is admirably fitted up for clubs, 
private parties, and athletic headquarters. 

The Press Clipping bureau, S10 Montgomery street, S. P. reads all 
papers on the Pacific Coast, and supplies dippings on all topics .business 
and personal. ___ 

Fine stationery, steel and copperplate engraving. Cooper & Co., 746 
Market street, San Francisco. 




SUMMER NOVELTIES 
JUST OPENED 



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Opposite Occidental Hotel. 



H. RAMSEY, 



Merchant 
Tailor. 



Williams Brothers. 
TAILORS. 



{ Successors to Thomas 8. Williams ) 



111 Sutter Street, Lick House Block 
San Francisco 




KEARNY STREET, Near Geary. 



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Establishment to 

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and Fitted to Glasses 



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Branch— 2704 Mission 
Tel. Mission J51 



Great Reduction in prioes during the summer months on Art Goods, 
Pictures, Crookery, Glassware, eto S. & G. Gump, 113 Geary street. 

See Rome and die: drink Jackson's Napa Soda and live. 



J^ouse and Sign !Painting 

1 Whitening and Papei Hanging, 
% Dealer in wall paper, etc. 

dOHM D. SULLIWAM 

Attorney-at- Law 
Rooms 34-38, 3d Floor Chronicle Building, San Francisco. 

Nelson's flmuGOse. 

Unequalled for Poison Oak, Sunburn, all Irritation of the Skin, 
and for the Toilet generally. 

Joseph Glllott's Steel Fens, 

Gold Medals. Paris, 1878-1889. These pens are " the 
best in the world." Sole agent for the United States. 
Mr. Henbt Hoe. 91 John street, New York. 
Sold by all Stationers . 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 10, 1897. 




SAN Francisco has been fairly embarrassed with riches 
this week, for beside the throng of Christian Endeav- 
orers and their friends, who have poured in upon us in 
crowds rivaling any hitherto known in this city, wc- have 
had Bryan, the silver orator, and the English Marquis 
Breadalbane and his Marchioness, either in themselves 
sufficient to create a stir. And yet, from a society stand- 
1. the city is deserted, and little better than of the 
" howling wilderness " type this week, the festivities of 
the Fourth having attracted the swim to the different re- 
sorts of their choice, there to enjoy life in the manner 
provided for them as most appropriate to the time. It 
must be admitted that San Rafael has had the lion's share: 
the tennis tournament at the Hotel Rafael proved a draw- 
ing card for all in the vicinity, to which the dances at 
night were a delightful finish. 

Claude Terry Hamilton's house party, at "The Hutch," 
was one of the jolltest at Sausalito. "The Bungalow," 
which is presided over by Mrs. Tillingbast, also had its 
quota of guests for the day, and at Hurlingame, San 
Mateo, Menlo Park, and thereabouts house parties have 
been given by Mr. and Mrs. Alvord, Mrs. 1. Requa, Cap- 
tain and Mrs. Long, Mr. and Mrs. Mark Requa, Captain 
and Mrs. l'ayson. the George Popes, \V. B. Tubbs and 
family. 

White weddings, blue weddings, and red weddings: each 
color has been well-represented at society marriages dur- 
ing the past year, but it is not often that all three are 
united at one ceremonial, as was the case on the Fourth, 
when Miss Birdie Coleman was the bride and Sam Abrams 
the groom, the lady patriotically selecting the national 
colors for her wedding, as most appropriate to the day 
upon which it took place. Tha ceremony was performed 
at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. H. Levy, on McAllister 
street, by the Rev. Rabbi Levy, the bridal party standing 
beneath a wedding bell of red, white, and blue blossoms. 
The bridal robe was of white satin <•» traine, trimmed with 
tulle and orange blossoms. Miss Julia Mensor, who offici- 
ated as maid-of-honor, was gowned in white and silver 
tulle over pink silk. An elaborate supper followed the 
ceremony, after which there was dancing. 

The most prominent society wedding of the present 
week took place on Thursday, when Mrs. Anna Jackson 
Wooster and A. H. Small were united in marriage at the 
Jackson residence, on Sutter street. 

Bartlett Springs has had great popularity this season 
with San Francisco folks. Among the latest acquisitions 
from here are Miss Jennie Blair and her brother, and Mrs. 
Louise Barroilhet, who will remain for several weeks. 
Mrs Monroe Salisbury and Miss Kate have gone to the 
Blue Lakes for the month of July. Mr. and Mrs. C. F. 
Tay are occupying a cottage at San Rafael this summer. 
At the Hotel Rafael this week the J. R. K. Nuttalls, Mrs. 
Sands Forman and her daughter, Mrs. Alex Forbes and 
her daughter, and the Misses Jolliffe have been added to 
the list of guests. The second of the paper chases will be 
ridden at San Rafael to-day, and they will continue to 
take place there every Saturday during the rest of the 
summer and autumn. General Warfleld is exceeding all 
former efforts in making the hotel the center of interest 
and delightful life across the bay. 

We are to be without one of our prettiest belles until 
late in the autumn. Miss Ida Gibbons having gone to visit 
her friend, Mrs. Burtsch, at Fort Bayard, N. M., for sev- 
eral weeks. Dr. Brigham is at Lake Tahoe getting his 
unique cottage in that locality in readiness for his family, 
who always pass the late summer and early autumn 
therein. Mrs. Valentine Hush and the Misses Hush, Mr. 
and Mrs. .1. II. Neustadter and family are at Lake Tahoe 
for the month of July. Mrs. Horace Hill and family are 
at Deer Park Inn. Mrs. and Miss Florence Whittell are 
among this month's Alaskan tourists. 



That charming young heiress, Miss Hal Floyd, has re- 
turned to her native heath to spend the summer, as usual, 
at her lovely California home in Lake County, New Or- 
leans being her abode during the rest of the year. Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas Watson are back again from their trip 
to Alaska, and Herman Oelrichs has returned from Paso 
Robles much improved in health. 

There are a number of Californians at present in Lon- 
don, prominent among them Bishop and Mrs. Nichols, Mr. 
and Mrs. Joe Grant, Mrs. Irwin, Will and Callingham 



C. P. Huntington, and Mr. and 



Byrne, Mr. and Mrs. 
Mrs. Denis O'Sullivan. 

Judge Coffey and party, Eli Denison's family, the 
Ferriers, Butlers, the Leon Blums, the Reiss and Roth- 
child families, and Messrs. Howard Adams, Dr. Rumhill, 
Milton S. Bremer, Wm. P. Lewis, Louis A. Schwabacher, 
the Misses Wood, Misses Greminger, and Mrs. King are at 
Highland Springs. 

On Wednesday, July 7th, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Wangen- 
heim celebrated their silver wedding at their home, 1620 
Vallejo street. They entertained a large number of friends 
at dinner, all of whom drank the health of the couple who 
have just completed the quarter century of married life. 
Mr. and Mrs. Waugenheim were the recipients of many 
beautiful and costly presents. 

The preparation of a bamjuet or successful dinner involves excel- 
lent natural taste and extended experience. Max Abraham at 428 
deary street has both. He superintends all the swell banquets, 
weddings, luncheons, etc— takes complete charge and always gives 
perfect satisfaction to those who employ him. Orders promptly at- 
tended to on shortest notice. 



Great Reduction Id prices during the summer months on Art Goods, 
Pictures. Crockery, Glassware, etc. S. & G. Gump, 118 Geary street. 



$1000.oo 

That missing word is not so very hard to find. 
Neither is Schilling's Best tea. 
Buy the tea — send us the yellow ticket, and 
your guess. 



Goim Oolong. 



The oldest and most reliable brand on the 
market. Sold only in 1-3 pound papers at 
20 cents per paper. All grocers keep it. 

Th<> I lirpiim A Preparatory school for the University, Law, and 
1 110 LLjbrJUlll Medical Colleges. 

Candidates are thoroughly prepared in all subjects (or the entrance ex- 
aminations o( Harvard or Yale, as well as for Stanford, the University of 
California, and the affiliated colleges References, Professor Jordan or 
any Stanford professor. The school is accredited with Stanford Univer- 
sity and Cooper Medical College. 
PHELAN BUILDING, Corner O'Panell and Market Sis. 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM. OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth 
Patches, Rash, and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on beauty, and defies de- 
tection. It has stood the test of 48 years 
and is so harmless we taste It to be sure 
It Is properlv made Accept no counter- 
felt of similar name. Dr. L. A. Sayre 
said to a lady of the haut-ton (a pa- 
tient): ''As you ladies will use them. I 
recommend 'Gouraud's Cream' as the 
least harmful of all the Skin prepara- 
tions," For sale by all Druggists and 
Fancy-Goods Dealers in the United 
States, Canadas, and Europe 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r, 

37 Great Jones St., N.Y. 




July 10, 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



THE WHEEL OF FORTUNE. 

X... IV. 

THE gamblers of those old days, as of the present, 
were strong!? icfeeted with superstition. The black 
cat held a peculiar position in the list of their mascots and 
hoodoos. Billy Fenton. a well-known sport, would not 
touch a box if he encountered a black cat in the morniug, 
while Xed Fitzsimmons, another of the fraternity, before 
leaving his lodgings put a chunk of raw liver in his pocket 
to feed to the tirst sable feline he met. To meet a negro 
on the crossing was by all deemed a dangerous omen, while 
a child or woman carrying a parcel meant undoubted suc- 
cess. Funerals were differently regarded, some contend- 
ing that to step in anywhere between the hearse and the 
procession of carriages was a rash proceeding, while 
others would walk rapidly, or even run to cross the street 
ahead of the hearse. 

The old-time gambler had most of the day to himself. In 
the swell houses the cards were never touched until late in 
the afternoon. But there were exceptional cases, such as 
gentlemen arriving from the country and burning with the 
thirst for play, who could not wait until night's dark man- 
tle, which hides so many of the imperfections of humanity, 
fell over the earth. In Bngg's place on Bush street, or in 
Scott's on Montgomery street, were always lounging some 
retainers, ready to summon in the regular staff at the de- 
mand of a visitor with a sack. Charley Burroughs, one of 
Scott's dealers, used to relate a tale about one of those 
mid-day callers. He was reading the morning papers 
about 10 a. m., when the porter admitted a tall, dignified- 
looking gentleman, who bowed very politely to Mr. Bur- 
roughs. 

" I presume, sir! " said the visitor, removing his over- 
coat, "that you are the proprietor of this place." 

"No such good luck," said Charley, "I am only one of 
the dealers." 

"And are you authorized to open up the game at any 
time 1 " 

"Certainly," said Charley, briskly. "I can accommo- 
date you in a few minutes. Tom, go to Scott for the keys 
of the safe and layout." 

In the absence of the messenger the stranger became 
confidential. He told Burroughs that he was an orange 
grower in the South who had only been in San Francisco 
twice before. He was a prosperous man, and he wanted 
to see the town. Above all things, he could not return to 
the rural districts without having acquired a knowledge of 
faro. He wanted to tell his cronies under the shade of the 
orange groves that he had seen all the bewilderments of 
a great city, and that, above all, that he had gambled. 
"I have a few dollars here that I want to lose," he said, 
and I am quite willing to part with them for the informa- 
tion you will give me." "Now," Charley used to say, 
" there was an innocence, a gentle pleading about that 
countryman that no one could resist. He looked at me so 
confidingly, and showed me the hundred dollars that he in- 
tended to lose, and not a cent more, that I thought a 
"hun " on the dead sure would not be a bad thing for the 
house. And so I opened up the game. The eyes of my 
friend dilated when he saw the cards, and he examined the 
box with the curiosity of a child inspecting a new toy. 

Well, I showed him how the combinations went, and 
gave him at the start a stack of white chips for nothing. 
He objected, and wanted to pay for them. But I said 
that as soon as he had acquired some knowledge of the 
game, he might take his chances against the bank. He 
picked it up quick enough, but not too quick, and asked 
me some questions which convinced me that he was not 
joshing me. Then we began to play in earnest, I dealing, 
and the darkey keeping cases. He dropped fifty dollars 
so quick in the first deal that I said "My friend, if you 
want to have any fun out of your hundred dollars, and 
learn the game, you'd better make smaller bets, and play 
more cautiously." 

"I guess you are right," he replied, "but it is exciting. 
Jim, give me a cigar." Now, there was something in the 
manner in which he asked for that smoke that made me 
for the first time suspicious about my friend, and when he 
bit the end off with a sort of a knowing gallows air, I deter- 
mined to be on my guard. Just then Captain B , from 

the Presidio, dropped in. The Captain was always ready 



for a game, and sat down at once, and bought chips. He 
took the cases, and I winked at Jim to get on the lookout. 
The minute the Captain came into the game, my orange 
grower changed altogether. He made bets and combina- 
tions that I knew I had never taught him, and played with 
a judgment that could only have been the result of long 
experience. In fact, I found that I was dealing to one 
whom I should consider a very expert gambler. When he 
was about five hundred dollars or so ahead of the game, to 
my relief Scott came in. I did not want the reputation of 
having begun business at an unusual hour to accommodate 
a fellow who was piling up our chips before him with 
appalling rapidity. 

He looked up as Scott entered. "Hallo, John," he said. 
' 'Hallo, West, " said Scott. ' 'When did you come to town?' 

"Only this morning, John, and as I felt a little dull, I 
thought I'd pass an hour or two with my old friend 
Charley here, who evidently does not remember me." 
Then I looked up, and it all came back to me. I was play- 
ing against Jack West of Tombstone, one of the most suc- 
cessful bunco steerers in the country, and an all-round 
gambler of acknowledged skill. 

"The wine is on me, boys," I said. "West, what will 
you have?" 

"I'll take four hundred and eighty from your pile first, 
Charley, my boy. But don't look sour. I'll come back 
to-night, and possibly drop it all and a few hundred more." 

Well, he did come back, but he did not drop it. At a 
rough calculation Mr. Jack West cleaned up in that fall 
trip of his in '71, from ours and other games, not less than 
twenty-five thousand dollars. At each he presented him- 
self in a new character. It was a way he had. Just for 
practice, I think." 

Indigestion dies where Jackson's Napa Soda lives. 

"When out nights drinking: use Bromo-Kola in the morning. 



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JTose. 



fflubber, 
Cotton, 

jCinen, 



For Water, Steam, 
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and other purposes 



GOODYEAR RUlBBER COMPANY, 

R. H. PEASE. Vice-President and Manager. 

73-75 FIRST ST., 573-575-577-579 MARKET ST. 

Portland, Or. San Francisco. 



Occidental Hotel. 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 



Wm. B. Hooper, Manager. 



San Francisco 



IS YOUR 

TITLE 

PERFECT? 



If you have aDy doubt, consult the 

California Title Insurance and Trust Go. 

Insurance polioies guaranteeing titles to be 
perfect issued and abstracts made and con- 
tinued. Money to loan on real estate 
Office— Mills Building. 
Chas. Pagk, Pres,; Howard E. Wright, Secty; A. J. Cabman y, Mgr, 

HD Dlf^nDn'Q RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the genu- 
Ur\. mv^vnu O ine— A specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical, 
Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the medical oelebrlties. Agents for California and the Pacific States, 
J. Q. STEELE & CO., 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 
Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED— Box of 50 pills, $1 25; of 100 pills. $2; of 200pllls, 
$150; of 400plUs,$6; Preparatory Pills $2. Send for circular. 



24 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 10, 1897. 



NOTES OF THE ARMY AND NAVY. 



TIIEIIE are to oe some very important changes soon in 
the personnel of the navy, consequent upon the fact 
that within the next four months twelve vessels will go 
into commission, which will necessitate attaching between 
90 and 120 officers. In addition to this, many officers now 
on shore duty will be sent to sea and vict vt rta. The tor- 
pedo boat Helena will be assigned to the Asiatic station, 
as will either the Marietta or the Wheeling. The one fail- 
ing to receive orders to China will be sent to Sitka, Alaska. 
The Philadelphia. Pinta, and Thetis will go out of commis- 
sion within the next four months, and the Monocacy will 
be condemned and sold. The Helena would have gone into 
commission on June 15th, but for the lack of men. Com- 
modore Crowninshield, U. S. N., Chief of the Bureau of 
Navigation, is now considering the names of several offi- 
cers holding the rank of Commander, with a view to their 
assignment to command the Marietta and Wheeling. The 
present indications are that the commanding officers of 
these vessels will be Commander F. M. Symonds, U. S. X., 
now Ordnance Officer at the Mare Island Navy Yard, and 
Commander F. W. Crocker, II. S. N., of the Independence. 
At the present t!roe naval officers are allowed three years 
of shore duty, but the coming necessity of having more 
officers at sea will, it is believed, cause the Navy Depart- 
ment to limit the period to two years. This will cause 
many a pang of regret in the service. 

The officers and their families at the Presidio are re- 
joicing over the probability of having the Post illuminated 
by electric lights and doing away with the ancient lamps, 
that are not only inadequate but dangerous. The idea was 
suggested by the Chamber of Commerce, and is receiving 
the attention of the Chief Quartermaster. It is probable 
that wires will be connected with this city's system of 
lighting. 

The rumor that the headquarters of the Department of 
the Columbia are to be transferred from Vancouver Bar- 
racks to Portland, <>r., is authoritatively denied. 

It is expected that the Baltimore will be ready for ser- 
vice about the middle of August. 

Rear-Admiral T. S. Phelps, IT. S. X., retired, is pass- 
ing the summer at Amagansett, Long Island, N. Y. 

Rear-Admiral . I. M. Miller. U. S. N., will assume com- 
mand of the Pacific squadron in August, and will use the 
Baltimore as his flagship. 

Commander N. M. Dyer, U. S. N., will be detached 
from duty August 1st as iuspector of the first lighthouse 
district, and ordered to the command of the Philadelphia 
per steamer of August Hth. He will relieve Captain C. 
S. Cotton, U. S. N., who will proceed home and be granted 
two months' leave of absence. 

Lieutenant-Commander J. K. Cogswell, U. S. N.. will 
be detached from the Marion on relief and then proceed 
to the Oregon as Executive Officer. Then Lieutenant- 
Commander F. J. Drake, U. S. X, will be detached from 
the Oregon, ordered home, and granted two months' leave 
of absence. 

Lieutenant-Commander R. R. Ingersoll, U. S. N., now 
on leave of absence, is at 1104 Indiana avenue, La Porte 
Ind. 

Lieutenant George P. Calvocoresses 0. S. N., of the 
Concord, has been promoted to the rank of Lieutenant- 
Commander 

Captain Elbridge R. Hills. Fifth Artillery, U. S. A., 
now at Fort Hamilton, X. Y.. became the happy father of 
a little daughter last month. 

Captain Gilbert 1'. Cotton, First Artillery, U. S. A. 
formerly stationed at the Presidio, was married recently 
in New York city to Miss .Maw R. Haddock. No cards 
were issued. They have gone to Europe and will be away 
until next autumn. 

Captain G. W. Sumner, U. S. N., now on leave of ab- 
sence, is at 1300 Rhode Island avenue, Washington D C 

Captain C. V. Gridley, l\ S. X, arrived here last Mon- 
day, and sailed on Wednesday for Yokohama to take com- 
mand of the Olympia, relieving CaDtain J. J. Read 
X 

Captain Seldon A. Day, Fifth Artillery, U. S. A who 
has been passing his leave of absence here and at Fresno 
has returned to duty at Fort Slocum. 



Captain J. H. Dorst, Fourth Cavalry, U. S. A., Military 
Attache at Vienna, will return to the United States upon 
being relieved by Lieutenant J. L. Chamberlain, First 
Artillery. I. S. A. Captain Dorst is well known here, as 
he was stationed at the Presidio some years ago. 

Captain Tasker H. Bliss, U. S. A., of the Subsistence 
Department, has been detailed to be Military Attache of 
the legation at Madrid, Spain. He was informed not to 
take his family with bim. 

Captain William E. Dougherty, First Infantry, U. S. A., 
who has been Acting Indian Agent at the Hoopa Valley 
Agency since June, 1893, arrived here last Saturday, and 
is at the Occidental Hotel. 

Chief Engineer T. F. Burgdorff, U. S. N., has been or- 
dered to the Mare Island Navy Yard. 

Civil Engineer R. E. Peary, D. S. N., lias left Boston 
for St. John's, X. B., en route to Labrador and Green- 
land. Several scientific men accompany him to make ob- 
servations. 

Paymaster H. C. Machette, U. S. N., retired, is now at 
Redlands, Cal. Mrs. Machette is with him, and finds her 
health improving in that balmy climate. 

Lieutenant W. L. Burdick, TJ. S. A., who was granted a 
leave of absence with permission to go abroad, has been 
ordered to the Independence at Mare Island. 

Lieutenant Elmer Lindsley, Sixth Cavalry, U. S. A., 
has been transferred to Troop M, Fourth Cavalry, ex- 
changing with Lieutenant J. H. Reeves, U. S. A. 

Lieutenant W. S. McNair, Third Artillery, U. S. A., 
now at the Presidio, recently became the father of a hand- 
some little daughter. 

Lieutenant Thomas C. Prince, U. S. M. C, has been 
promoted to the rank of Captain, and will assume the 
duties of Assistant Quartermaster. 

Lieutenant H. T. Mayo, U. S. N., has been detached 
from the Thetis and ordered to the Bennington. He re- 
lieved Lieutenant O. E. Lasher, U. S. N., who has been 
ordered home and granted two months' leave of absence. 

Lieutenant T. Porter, U. S. N., has been detached from 
the Naval Academy, and sailed from here last Wednesday 
for Honolulu, to act as executive officer of the Marion. 

Lieutenant John D. Miley, Fifth Artillery, U. S. A., has 
been announced as Acting Engineer Officer of the Depart- 
ment of California. 

Lieutenant George G. Gatley, Fifth Artillery, U. S. A., 
has changed his position from Fort Hamilton to Fort 
Wadsworth. 

Lieutenant Frank L. Winn, Twelfth Infantry, U. S. A., 
now on leave of absence, is in London. 

Lieutenant James Hamilton, Third Artillery, U. S. A., 
who is absent on sick leave, is visiting friends at Holyoke, 
Mass. 

Lieutenant Thomas Bentley Mott, First Artillery, U. S. 
A., aide-de-camp to Major General Merritt, U. S. A., is 
in London. 

Lieutenant T. M. Anderson, Fourth Cavalry, U. S. A., 
who was recently promoted, is visiting his parents, Colonel 
and Mrs. T. M. Anderson, U. S. A., at Vancouver Bar- 
racks. He will soon join at Fort Potter. 

Lieutenant Edward F. McGlachlin, Jr., U. S. A., re- 
cently promoted and assigned to the First Artillery, will 
remain on duty with the Fifth Artillery until September 1st. 



MT. VERNON CO., Baltimore. 

Tbe undersigned, baring been appointed Agents for the 
Pacific Coast for tbe sale of tbe manufactures of above 
company, bave now in store : 

SAIL DUCK— ALL NUMBERS. 
HYDRAULIO-ALL NUMBERS. 
DRAPER AND WAGON DUCK. 

From 30 to 130 incbes wide; and a complete assortment 
of all qualities 28H-inch duck, from 7 to 15 ozs.. Inclusive 
MURPHY, QRANT & CO. 



^W 



GEORGE. W. SHREVE, SKiffi™* 

Headquarters for Hunters', Anglers', and 
Sportsmen's Goods. 

Guns, Fishing Tackle, Athletic Goods. 

Supplies for Hunters. Campers. Wheelmen, Boxers, 
Base Bailers, Trampers. Bed rock prices. 
Send for catalogue. Ttl. Clay 41. 



July 10, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



25 



Second Lieutenant Lloyd England, Fifth Artillery, V. 
S. A., recently promoted, will remain on duty with the 
Third Artillery until September 1st. 

llias Cecilia Miles, daughter of Major-General Nelson A. 
Miifs. I' . S. A. is visiting Lieuteuant Colonel and Mrs. 
W. S. Worth. (J. S. A., at Governors' Island. 
> Ensign Edward Moale Jr., U. S. N., has been promoted 
to Lieutenant (Junior Gradei. He is a son of Colonel Ed- 
ward Moale. I'. S. A., who was stationed here for several 
years and resided at the Occidental Hotel. 

Cadet K. /.. .ichnston, D. S. X., and Cadet David W. 
Todd, U. S. N., have been ordered to the Oregon, Cadet 
H. V. Butler Jr., U. S. N., Cadet O. S. Knepper, U. S. N., 
and Cadet W. C. Davidson, U. S. N., to the Concord, 
Cadet H. Laning. U. S. N., to the Marion, Cadet W. H. 
Standley, C. S. N., to the Monterey, Cadet C. B. Barnes, 
U. S. N., to the Independence, Cadet M. J. McCormack to 
the Philadelphia, and Cadet J. R. Monoghan, U. S. N., to 
the Monadnock. 

The beautiful set of silver service for which the people 
of Oregon subscribed $4,000, was formally presented to 
the battleship Oregon, last Tuesday, in the armory of the 
First Regiment of the National Guard of Oregon. Gov- 
ernor Lord made the presentation speech, and Captain 
A. S. Barker, U. S. N, responded and received the gift. 
Lieutenant C. L. Hussey, U. S. N., of the Oregon, accom- 
panied Captain Barker. The officers of the Monterey and 
Monadnock were also present. 

The training ship Comanche started out last Saturday 
on a seven days' cruise on the Bay of San Francisco, 
manned by about one hundred officers and members of the 
Naval Battalion. 

Lieutenant Sidney A. Cloman, Fifteenth Infantry, U. S. 
A., arrived here last Sunday from Fort Bayard, N. M. 
On August 14th he will commence his duties as military 
instructor at the University of California. 

Lieutenant Charles B. Satterlee, Third Artillery, U. S. 
A., has been granted a six months' leave of absence, ow- 
ing to serious illness. 

When Rear Admiral J. N. Miller, U. S. N., returns from 
London he will proceed to this coast to relieve Rear Ad- 
miral Lester A. Beardslee, U. S. N., as Commander-in- 
Chief of the Pacific Squadron. The latter will be made 
President of the naval examining board at Washington, 
D. C. 

BURNING A LOVE LETTER.— letitia Elizabeth landon, in poems. 



I took the scroll ; I could not brook 

An eye to gaze on it save mine ; 
I could not bear another's look 

Should dwell upon one thought of thine. 
My lamp was burning by my side; 

1 held thy letter to the name; 
I marked the blaze swift o'er it glide ; 

It did not even spare thy name. 
Soon the light from the embers passed ; 

I felt so sad to see it die, 
So bright at first, so dark at last, 

I feared it was love's history. 



UNDER ordinary circumstances a champagne bath 
would mean a small fortune: but at Vichy Springs 
are the most popular resorts in the State. These curative 
and exhilarating waters are free. The Springs is beauti- 
fully located, and, under the management of Miss D. D. 
Allen, makes an ideal summer residence; accommodations 
are first-class, and Vichy water abundant. Only three 
miles from Ukiah, the terminus of the San Francisco and 
North Pacific Railway. 



EL CAMPO is the resort nearest San Francisco, and 
it is patronized by immense crowds every Sunday. It 
is easily accessible, and 25 cents pays for a round- trip ticket. 

Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup " tor your 
children while teething . 



Jackson's Napa Soda is a gentle aperient. 



Bbecham's Pills for wind and distress after eating. 



Bromo Kola cures headaches, neuralgia, and nervous troubles. 



"Out of the frying-- 

pan into tin' lire." Take care 
that you don't go that way, 
when you try to make 
yourwashing easier. Bet- 
ter be sure- of what you're 
tloinjr. Gee Pearline, the 
original washing-compound, 
the best-known, the fully- 
proved. There are 
plenty of imi- 
... & .^\\ tationsofit. But 

Jy^ even if they're 

\ not dangerous — and some 
1 / are — they're not econom- 
ical. Pearline used properly, goes farther, 
does more work, and saves more wear, than 
anything else that's safe to use. 536 




ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Best & Belcher Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works — Virginia District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors held on 
the 1st day of July, 1897, an assessment, No. 62, of Twenty -five oents per 
share, was levied upon the capita] stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately in United States gold coin to the secretary, at the offloe of the com- 
pany, room 33, Nevada Block, 3l.9 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock on which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 

5th DAY OF AUGUST, 1897, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction; and, unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on THURSDAY, the 26th day of 
August, 1897, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

M. JAFFE. Seoretary 
Office: Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal, 

SPECIAL MEETING. 
Bullion Mining Company. 
Office of the Bullion Mining Company, room 11, 331 Pine street, San Fran- 
cisco, July 1, 1897.— Pursuant to the action of the Board of Directors of the 
Bullion Mining Company, held on the 1st day of July, 1897. notice is hereoy 
given that a meeting of the stockholders of the said Bullion Mining Com- 
pany will be held at its office, at room No. 11, in the San Francisco Stock 
and Exchange Building, No. 331 Pine street, San Francisco, California, on 

FRIDAY, JULY 16, 1897, 
at 1 o'clock p. M., for the purpose of making such disposition of the shares 
of the capital stock of said company, purchased by it, as said stockholders 
may deem fit; and for the pui pose of amending the by-laws of said com- 
pany or adopting such by-laws as said stockholders may desire. By order 
of the Board of Directors. 

R. R. GRAYSON, Seoretary. 
Office— Room 11, 331 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING 
Yellow Jacket Silver Mining Company. 
The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Yellow Jacket Silver 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the company. Gold Hill, Ne- 
vada, on Monday, the 

19th DAY OF JULY, 1897, 
at the hour of 3:30 o'clock p, M. , for the purpose of electing a Board of Trus- 
tees to serve for the ensuing year and the. transaction of such other busi- 
ness as mav come before the meeting. 
Transfer books will close on Monday. July 12, 1897, at 3 o'clock p. m. 

W. H BLAUVELT, Seoretary. 




ST. LAWRENCE 

L1VEEY AND 

SALES STABLE. 

W. E. BRIDGE, Proprietor. 

423 Post St., between Powell and 
Mason, San Francisco. 
Telephone No. 1323. 



BRUSHES 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, bil- 
liard tables, brewers, book-binders, eandy-makers, 
canners, dyers, flour-mills, foundries, laundries, 
paper-hangers, printers, painters, shoe factories. 
stablemen, tar-roofers, tanners tailors, etc. 

BUCHANAN BROS,, 

BRUSH MANUFACTURERS, 609 Sacramento St. ,S. F Tel. 5610. 

DRS. DERBY X WINTER, Dentists, 

Of 206 KEARNY STREET, removed to Room 33, Flood Build- 
ing, Market and Fourth Streets. 
Telephone, Clay 391. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 10, 1897. 



By l^ail, Boat apd Sta^e. 



Southern Pacific Co.==Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 



Leave. I 



Prom July I, I**:. 



*fi:O0 A NHes, San Jose, and way stations 

7:00A Atlantic Express, Ogdenand East 

7:00 a Benlola, Sacramento, Orovtlle, and Redding, via Davis 

7:00 a Vacavllle and Rumsey — 

7 :3U a Martinez. San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Cahstoga, Santa Rosa 
8:30a Nlles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Marysvilte, 

Chlco, Tebama, and Red Bluff 

•8:30 a Peters, Milton, and Oakdale 

9:00a New Orleans Express, Merced. Fresno, BaUersflcld, Santa 
Barbara, Los Angeles, Deming, El Paso, New Orleans, and 
East.. 



9:00a 

•i':66'p 
1:00 p 
1:80 P 
4:00 P 

4:00 P 



ft KJP 

5:00 p 

8 .OOP 
0:00 p 
18:0Op 
8:00 p 



Vallejo 

Nlles, San Jose Llvermore, and Stockton 

Sacramento River steamers 

Nik-H. San Jose, and Llvermore 

Martinez and Way Stations 

Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Callstoga, El Verano 

and Santa Rosa 

Benlola, Winters. Woodland, Knight's Landing, Marys 

vtlle. Orovllle. and Sacramento 

Lalhrop, Stockton, Modesto, Merced, Raymond (for Yosem- 
lte) and Fresno, going via Nlles, returning via Martinez.. 
Los Angeles Express, Tracy, Fresno, Mojave (for Rands- 

trarg 1. Santa Barbara, and Los Angeles 

Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, for Mojave and East... 

European mall, Ogden and East 

Hay wards, Nlles and San Jose 

Vallejo 

Oregon Express, Sacramento, Marysvllle, Redding, Port- 
land, Puget Sound and East 



8:45 P 
5 :45 P 
8:45 P 
6:15 P 

4:15 P 
«7:15P 



6:I5P 
12:16 P 

7:15P 
•9:00 P 

8:45 a 

7:45 P 

9:15 A 



12:15 P 

7.45A 
6 : 15 p 

10:15 A 
7:45 A 

tt:45p 

7:45 A 



San Leandro and Haywards Local. (Foot of Market St.) 



i«6-00 Al 
8:00 A 


MCLROSI, 


[ 7:15 A 


Seminary Park. 


(9:45 A 


9:00A 


Fitchboro, 


10:45 A 


10:00 a 


El.MHtmST. 


11:45 A 


ill. 00 a 


San Leandro. 


12:45 P 


IKMII H 


South San Leandro, 


'1 :4ft p 


3:00 p 


ESTUDILLO, 


13:4ft p 


(3:00 p 


Lorenzo, 


4:45 P 


4:00 P 


Cherry, 


(5:45 P 


5:00 P 


and 


6:15 p 


5:30 p 


Haywards. 


7:45 P 


7:00 p 




8:45 P 


8:00 p 


i Runs through to Nlles. 


9:45 P 


9:00 p 


t From Nlles 


10:50 P 


ttll:lS P 




tttl2:00 P 



Santa crdz Division (Narr ow Gau ge). (Foot of Market St.) 

17:45 a Sada Cruz Excursion, Santa Cruz & principal way stations (8:05 p 

8:15a Newark, Centerville, San Jose, Pel ton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 5:50 P 

•2 :15 p Nowark, Centervllle, San Jose. New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations •]0:5ua 

4:lfip San Jose and Glenwood 9:2)/ 

1i:16p Felton and Santa Cruz g9;20 A 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— *7:16. 9:00. and 
ll:UU A. M., 11:00. •atou. 18:00. «4:00, t5:00 and *«:00p. m 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway— *6:00, 8:00, 10:00 A. M ; 113:00*1:00, 
IS ^0.»3:00. 14:00 •5:00p.m. 

Coast Division (Third and Townsend streets). 

•7 :00 a San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesdays only) 1 :30 P 
J7:30 a Sundav excursion for San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, 

and principal way stations I8;35 p 

9 :00 a San Jose, Tres Plnos, Santa Cruz, PaciQc Grove, Paso Robles 

San LulsOblspo, Guadalupe. Surf and principal way stations 4:15 P 

10:40 a San Jose and way stations B:4S A 

11:30 a Palo Alto and way stations 6:25 p 

•2:30 P San Mateo. Redwood, Menlo Park. Santa Clara. San Jose, 

GUroy, Hollistor, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, Pacific 

Grove ... *10:30A 

•3:30 p San Jose. Sant-i Cruz, Pacific Grove and way stations . *7*3Up 

*4:S0p San Jose and Wav Stations *8:05 A 

5:30 p San Jose and principal way stations "8:45 a 

6:30 p San Jose and way stations . 1:35 A 

til :45p Sao Jose and way stations ..... J7:30p 



A tor Morning. 
JSundaysonly 

ISaturdays and Sunday 



P for Atternoou. "Sundays excepted tSaturdays only. 
►t M.joday.Tdursdav and Saturday nights only . 
^Sundays and Mondavs. 



The Pacific Tkansfek Company win call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Aeents for Time Cards and 
other Information 

The Grand Pacific, 3 % s " ck -- n - st -- s - D lx™wj«oo 



Furnished ro< 



B bv llic .I. 



RS ELLA OORBETT, Proprietress. 
>r month Grant, WW. 



San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tibokon b'ERRY- Foot o( Market Street. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:30, »:uu, 1 1 :uu a M ; 12:35, 3 :S0 5:10, 8:30 P M. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11:30 p M. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :50 and 11:30 P M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00,9:311. ii:i»i a M: 1:80 3:30. 5:00.8:20PM. 

SAN RAFAEL TO S N F ANCISC0. 
WEEK DAYS— 8:10, 7:50 DAI, 11:10 am; 14:46, 3:40,5:10pm. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at l:ftianu 8:35 PM. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10. 9:40. Il:lu am: 1:40.3:40.5:00.6:25pm. 

Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



LEAVE S. F. 


in Eflect June 13, 1897 


ARRIVE IN 8. F. 


Week Days.! Sundays 


DESTINATION. 


Sundays l Week Days 


7:30am 
3:30PM 
5:10 PM 


8:00 am 
9:30am 
5:00 pm 


Novato, 
Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa. 


10:40 am 1 8:40 A M 
6:10pm 1 10:25 AM 
7:35pm I 6:22 PM 




8:00 am 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyservllle. Cloverdale 




10:25 A M 


7:30am 
3:30 pm 


7:35PM 


6:22 P M 


8:80 PM | 8:0 ° AM 


Hopland, Uklah 1 7:35pm 1 'gl^p^ 


7:30AM | 8:uUam 
3:30PM 


Quernevllle. | 7:35 pm | 'gifj $ JJ 


7:30am I 8:0oam 
5:10pm 1 5:00pm 


Sonoma, 1 10:40am 1 8:40 A M 
Glen Ellen. 1 6:10pm | 6:22 pm 


7:30am I 8:00am 
3:30pm 1 5:00pm 


<!eba«tonnl 1 10:40 AM 1 10:25 A M 
sebastopoi. | 7;85pM | 8:2 2 P M 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs; at Geyservllle 
for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for High- 
land Springs. Kelseyvllle, Soda Bay, Lakeport, and Bartlett Springs; at 
Uklah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Laurel Del 
Lake, Upper Lake, Porno, Potter Valley, John Day's, Riverside. Ller- 
ley's, Bucknell's Sashedotn Heights, Hullvllle, Boonevllle, Orr's Hot 
Springs, Mendocino City. Ft. Bragg. West port, Usal. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round TrlpTlckets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates 

TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 
A.W. FOSTER. Pres. &. Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN. Gen. Pass. Agent. 

Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 

Steamers leave Broadway Wharf, San Francisco for ports in Alaska, 
9 a. m.. July 5. 10, 15. -.20, 23, 30 and every ftth day thereafter. 

For Brltlsn Columbia and Puget Sound ports, 9 a. m . July 5. 10, 15, 
20. 25, 3). and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), Steamer "Pomona," at 2 p.m. July 6, 9, 
13, 17. 21.26, 30 ; Aug. 3, 7 11,16 20. 24, 29; Sept 1,6,10,14,18 22,27. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, at 9 a. m.; July 1, 5, 9, 13, 
17. 81, 9h, 20. ana every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford Santa Barbara, Port Los 
Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles) and Newport, 11 a. m., July 3, 7, 11. 15, 
19,23 27,31 and every fourth day thereafter. 

For Ensenada, Mag lalena Bay. San Jose del Cabo, Mazatlan, Altata. La 
Paz Santa Rosalia, and Guaymas (Mexico), steamer "Orizaba," 10 A. m, 
the 2d of each month. 

The company reserves the right to change, without previous notice, 
steamers, sailing dates, and hours of sailing. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel. No. 4 New Montgomery street. 
GOODALL, PERKINS* CO., Gen'l Agents. 10 Market st.S. F. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p m., for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG. 

calling at Kobe (Hiogo) Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at 

Hongkong with steamers for India, etc No cargo received on board on 

day of sailing. 

Doric (via Honolulu) Tuesday. July 27. !W>7 

Bblgic. Saturday, August 14, 1897 

Coptic (via Honolulu) 'J bursduy. September 2. lf*97 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, September 21. 1897 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company^ Office. No. 421 Market street, 
corner First. D. D. STUBBS. Secretary. 



EAN1C 




(otipiUf- 



S S "Australia", for Honolulu only, Tuesday, 
Julv 13th at 2 p m 

S. S. "Moona." Thursday, July 22d, at 2 P m 
Line to Coolgardle, Australia, and Capetown, 
South Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS A BROS. CO., 
Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight office, 327 
Market St.. San Francisco 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 
Estate of JOSEPH HOCH, Deceased. 

Noti. the undersigned, a Freese administrator 

of the o tbe Creditors of. and all 

P ersoD ^ iththc 

ichors, within ton mo , publication 

to the said l.C.1 Iministrator 

rwm No. 36, third floor Chronicle Building cod 
San iFnnolSi 

b ?£ iD M? s " r "' '» the City and Count v of Sun Fra 

of California. A c KK! 

Administrator of tin Such, deceased. 

Dated at San Francisco, June 9. 1807. 

J. D. SULLIVAN. Attorney for Administrator. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 

Estate of JAMES S. BENNET, Deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, A. Breeae, Administrator 
■.rate of James S Bennet. deceased, to the creditors of, and all per- 
sons having claims against the said deceased, to exhibit them, with the 
arj '. -uiin-rs. within four months after the first publication of this 
notice, to i lie said Administrator, at room 35. Chronicle building, corner 
Geary and Kearny streets, San Francisco, Cal., the same being his place 
for tbe transaction of the business of the said estate in the City and 
County of San Francisco, State of California. 

A. C. FREESE. Administrator of the Estateof James S. Bennet, Deceased. 
.1 D Sullivan. Attorney for the Administrator. 
Dated at San Francisco. July 2. 1897 






CO -o 



So 
-p 

c r 

L. . 

o 1_ 

— j: 

m o 
O o 

£ o 

P n 




10 s 

< (0 



PANORAMIC SERIES. PLATE 69. 



WITH S. F. NEWS LETTER, JULY 17,1897. 




Tavern on Mt. Tamalpais. 



PICTURESQUE CALIFORNIA. 

VIEWS ON THE MOUNT TAMALPAIS SCENIC RAILWAY. 



Talier J'lwto. S. F. 
A Curve on the Road. 



Price per Copy. 10 Cents. 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 




9 U* rRANciseo 




(8> villi 0vm&%bbtxt% zzv* 




Vol.LV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 17, 1897. 



Number 3. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by l he proprietor, FRED MARRIOTT 
5H Kearny street, San Francisco, entered at San Francisco Post- 
office as Second-class Matter. 

The office of the XEWS LETTER in New York City is at Temple Court; 
and at Chicago, 903 Boyce Building, [Frank E Morrison, Eastern 
Representative), where information may be obtained regarding subscrip- 
tion and advertising rates. 

A TELEGRAM containing the sad news of the death of 
J. J. O'Brien has just reached us. He had gone to 
Highland Springs for a little change and recreation, leav- 
ing here last Monday. His death was unexpected, and 
will be heard with regret by the thousands who knew him 
here. 

THERE will be a meeting of all the city and county 
Boards of Health of California in September next, to 
discuss the matter of pure foods, and to arrange, if pos- 
sible, for a systematic crusade upon adulterated goods. 
This approaching Congress must be looked upon by a large 
number of our manufacturers of "Absolutely Pure Pood " 
with dismay and alarm. For if the people once become 
thoroughly aroused they will be likely to require an official 
chemist's guarantee rather than the display type of the 
makers. 

CAPTAIN William L. Merry has been appointed by 
President McKinley Minister to Nicaragua, Salvador 
and Honduras. The selection will meet the approval of 
the people of this city, and is a deserved compliment to 
him. He is an enthusiastic annexationist, and we would 
not be surprised if he were caught trying to annex these 
South American republics to the United States. They 
are much nearer than Hawaii. Seriously, however, Cap- 
tain Merry's appointment is a fortunate choice, as he is a 
well-posted, capable and active advocate of the extension 
of California trade among countries south of us. 



VERY soon Lieutenant Peary will sail from the At- 
lantic seaboard for the Arctic, on his seventh adven- 
ture toward the Pole. The treasure and lives that have 
been sacrificed in this vain search, outweigh the fruitless 
knowledge that might follow success to Peary's or any 
subsequent assault upon the frozen unknown. The daily 
papers are publishing pictures of the "Hope," the vessel 
in which the Lieutenant will sail away, and giving a 
description of her equipments and crew. It is rather dis- 
appointing, however, not to find in the papers the names 
of those who will proceed to the rescue of Lieutenant 
Peary and his comrades. 

THE resolution introduced by Dr. Rottanzilast Tuesday, 
which suspended the work of bituminizing Geary 
street until gas and water main connections shall have 
been made thereon, should become a part of the city's or- 
dinances and the principle of general application. Too 
often the improvements appear to be made solely for the 
purpose of being torn asunder. Notice of the intention 
to bituminize the streets should be made in advance, and 
sent to the water, light, and other companies in abundant 
time for the completion of contemplated work before the 
contract for such improvements are undertaken. No 
doubt by this method much loss and inconvenience would 
be avoided. It costs the companies more to tear up and 
replace good work than they pay for laying their mains on 
unimproved streets. Such a resolution as was presented 
by Dr. Rottanzi, intelligently observed, would be a relief 
to both the city, the corporations, and the taxpayers. 



REPORTS from the various reform institutions of the 
State are not encouraging to those who are inmates 
or to the people who pay for their expensive maintenance. 
There is very little judgment shown by the courts in send- 
ing children to these semi-penal institutions, in the first 
place, and good, medium, and bad are mixed indiscrimin- 
ately. Add to this the fact that politics and not principles 
are in control, and these reform schools are likely to be- 
come preparatory departments for the Penitentiaries. 

THE bogus brandy which created so much comment in 
making its escape from Inspector Dockery 's inquisitive 
augur, has not been heard from recently, and there is an 
evident attempt being made by the Federal authorities to 
prevent the trial of the food inspector. They have been 
caught in bad company, and would be glad to let the case 
drop; but Dockery demands vindication. This would be 
obtained with the utmost ease if there were only a few 
gallons of the prune juice and fusel oil at hand to try on the 
Government officials, who would flee if they escaped death. 

BREAD, meat, shelter and education for the unem- 
ployed, by means of colonization and beet cultivation 
in California, promises to be near at band. The lands 
necessary for the experiment have been secured near 
Salinas by Claus Spreckels, and in a short time, it is 
hoped, the colonists will be at work increasing the pro- 
ductive wealth of the State, and earning their living. 
Many letters of inquiry concerning this plan of helping the 
needy have been received. It may be noted, however, 
that none of them are signed by Debs, as his scheme does 
not contemplate the acquisition of property by toil and 
obedience to law. The average tramp hungers for water 
about as ardently as the anarchists represented by Debs 
yearn for work. 

THE worshippers at the Temple in Chinatown doubtless 
have a very peculiar idea of the Endeavorers who 
visited the place of their Deity early this week. The As- 
syrian is said to have come down like the wolf on the fold. 
So descended the Eastern Endeavorers upon the bric-a- 
brac which bravely furnished forth the Joss house of the 
pagan. Burning punks, feathers, vases, all things that 
could be lifted by the fingers or pried up with a crowbar 
were carried away by the desecrating Christians. The 
paraphernalia of the Chinese Temple thus stolen will adorn 
many a mantle and share the centre table with the Bible 
in many an Eastern Endeavorer's lovely home — by whom 
the Eighth commandment was left behind when he 
started West. 

THE Board of Education set up a dangerous precedent 
when, at its last meeting, it endorsed Director Wal- 
ler's motion to permit the expenditure of school funds by 
the committee of hygiene. The justification, that a differ- 
ence might arise between the Board of Health and the 
committee concerning the sanitary condition of the schools, 
is not worthy a moment's notice. If all the committees 
are to be allowed to go on and incur indebtedness, run 
bills, and appoint a lot of do-nothings to positions when 
there is nothing to do but eat the taxpayers' hard-earned 
coin, a general alarm should be turned in. A Grand Jury 
committee has just made a report in which it is shown 
that the Board of Education for the fiscal year closed 
created a deficit of $115,753.56. This fact discourages 
the taxpayers, but appears to have a most cheerful and 
exhilarating effect upon the directors. Evidently this 
committee on hygiene is badly in need of a first-class 
sewer system and thorough flushing with salt water. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 17, 1897. 



PANAMA OR NICARAGUA— WHICH? 

WITHOUT knowing what the facts were, the News 
Letter has long suspected that operations at the 
Panama Canal were not being carried on for nothing. 
I )ur dailies would have it that tropical growth had tilled 
up the cut. that the machinery was rusted and useless, 
and that the whole undertaking was piactically at an end. 
Yet it was known that money was coming from somewhere 
to employ a large number of men and that some sort of 
progress was being made. It now turns out that some 
3,000 men are at work ; that the plant has been kept in excel- 
lent condition, and that 16 miles of the Canal on the east 
side have been completed. All this has been accomplished 
as quietly as possible, because the Rothschilds had a great 
scheme under way to buy up the almost valueless stock of 
the old company. This they appear to have pretty nearly 
accomplished, and now a reorganized scheme to finish the 
Canal has been permitted to burst forth upon an aston- 
ished world. It is shown, by the highest engineering ex- 
perts, that the detailed plans of the work remaining to be 
done can be executed for $1(10,000.000; a mere bagatelle, 
considering the importance of the enterprise. It is esti- 
mated that four per cent dividends could be paid from the 
start. It is authoritatively put forth that England and 
France are acting together in support of the Rothschild's 
scheme, and that Germany's favor is not likely to be long 
delayed. Now an effort is to be made to induce the United 
States to come in, and form a quadruple alliance for the 
completion and neutralization of the canal. The actual 
financial participation of the governments named is not 
looked for, but it would be readily accepted, if offered. 
All this is in the nature of a surprise, but it is quite in 
keeping with the financial coups for which the great 
House of Rothschilds is famous. The question for the 
I'nited States to consider is as to whether they will come 
into this four cornered scheme of neutrality, or go it alone 
by building the Nicaragua Canal. They "might do both. 
If they are not to be called upon to put up any money in the 
Panama plan, there does not seem to be any objection to 
their joining in the neutrality guarantee. By so doing 
they would appear to have everything to gain and 
nothing to lose. 

They would be just as free to go on and build the 
Nicaragua Canal as tbey are now. But the consideration 
arises as to whether it would be expedient for them to do 
so. That is too large a question to discuss off hand and 
within the short space of a newspaper article, but it is 
one that our statesmen at Washington mjstsoon face and 
determine. It is meet and right that we should have a 
National policy on the subject, and that the people should 
know what it is, to the end that they may join heart and 
soul in its support. There can be" no douht that the 
Nicaragua route would be much the more favorable to the 
interests of California, as well as to the best part of cen- 
tral America. It would also best subserve the interests 
of our Atlantic States in their Asiatic commerce. The 
Panama route would best serve England in the matter of her 
trade with South America, and Australia, whilst that via 
Nicaragua would lie the more favorable to her connections 
with British Columbia, Japan, and China. It is a pity that 
our Government has not long ere this settled and deter- 
mined these two questions in regard to Nicaragua: (1) is 
the route practicable beyond a doubt; G) what is a true and 
honest estimate of the cost, founded on detailed surveys, 
borings, etc., made along the entire line of the proposed 
canal? The latest and most authoritative report upon 
these two points is very unfavorable, and President Cleve- 
land's commission is undoubtedly right in saying that before 
anything more is done, these considerations should be con- 
clusively and finally set at rest. Then what about the 
Bulwer-Clayton treaty with England? Is that treatv to 
be abrogated, or lived up to? That is another point to be 
settled before we can be sure that we are right enough to 
go ahead. The Nicaragua route has so manv and such 
great advantages for California that our people mav be 
depended upon to stand by it through thick and thin. "and 
if in the end, they have to bow to that which they may fail 
to prevent, it will tie with deep feelings of regret. They 
will, however, take hope in the fact that our government 
is committed to Nicaragua, and that sooner or later the 
Canal is bound to be built. 



The Bradbury-Ward The actions of the authorities in re- 
Triai. leasing Mrs. John Bradbury, and 

their expression of intention to press 
the case against Mr. Ward for violating the moral code, 
have, we hope, awakened in this community a general feel- 
ing that mercy is not tempered by good sense, that justice 
has not been done, and that the effects of such proceed- 
ings are disastrous to the healthy moral tone of a com- 
munity. The attempt to create sympathy for the peni- 
tent wife has been a feature of this case, built up on un- 
tenable assumption of innocence and inexperience, and at 
direct variance with the facts. There can be no doubt 
that Mrs. Bradbury has a thorough acquaintance with the 
world, and that she is as able to think and act for herself 
as any woman. That she was quite as much to blame as 
Ward is as apparent as the noonday sun. It is idle to say 
that she was entrapped by her companion in guilt, or that 
her eyes were closed to the degrees of intimacy which 
marked the mutual advance from introduction to adultery. 
If there ever was a case wherein the wages of sin were 
discounted and the consequences of wrong acknowledged 
unblushingly and knowingly, this case stands in that posi- 
tion. Until the hand of the law was laid heavily upon the 
guilty pair, there was no expression of inexperience, no 
plea of particular innocence. In the acts of shame there 
was an equality of degree and a freely accepted division of 
responsibility. Adam excused himself to God by saying, 
,: the woman gave me of the fruit and I did eat." But 
both the transgressors were driven from the Garden. 

The people of California, by a gallantry that were better 
named crime, have come to hold ihat there is one standard 
of right for a woman and another for a man. Sex estab- 
lishes one code of justice and pulls down another. That in 
its practical effects this is true, we find in the frequent 
and often totally uujustifiable resort to deeds of blood. 
Thirst for revenge for real or fancied wrongs is fed by 
the knowledge that a woman need not suffer for her own 
deeds of violence; when the facts are that not one time in 
a hundred is she fre3 from equal guilt. This feeling of 
freedom from responsibility is seized by every adventuress, 
every "victim" of misplaced confidence, and every creature 
of the half-world; and like any other indulgence not having 
a basis in justice and truth, its consequences are hurtful, 
and its influence upon public morals blighting. We are not 
now dealing with the bearing of society toward the way- 
ward. Here as elsewhere a man may tread the primrose 
path of dalliance and his moral offenses be condoned, 
while for the same laches a woman finds the doors of soci- 
ety bolted and her efforts to obtain admission vain. This 
is the constitution of society everywhere. We are aware 
of no exceptions. It is fixed and absolutely unchangeable. 
But we are not considering that feature of the case, be- 
cause it has no concern in the treatment of these people 
and their relations to the authorities. 

Particept criminis are the words written from one end to 
the other in this case of Mrs. Bradbury and Mr. Ward, 
and the attempt to accent the guilt of one and condone 
the faults of the other, is a burlesque on justice, and in it- 
self a crime. 

The Taxpayer's Part The time of the year has arrived 
In Their when an allotment is being made of 

Own Government the taxpayer's share in the govern- 
ing of this city. The rate of tax- 
ation they are to pay is being fixed. They have no voice 
even in that; for the amount is proving greater than they 
agreed to pay. and will be anywhere from 30 to 50 per 
cent, larger than they instructed and empowered their 
representatives to levy. Such a state of facts is so mon- 
strous that one wonders what is to be the end of it all. 
When solemn pledges are laughed to scorn, and the tax- 
payers who recall them are treated with contempt, it is 
high time to take pause and do something. If citizens 
cannot determine the limit of their own taxation what is 
there left that they can do. If certain Supervisors solemn- 
ly pledge themselves before election to do certain things, 
and fail to do them afterwards, what ought to be done 
with men so false to a public trust? If they violated a 
private trust in so fraudulent a way, they could be sent to 
States prison. Why not punish them with equal severity 
when false to the larger engagement? Platforms should 
be held sacred and pledges given under them should be 



July 17. 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS l.ICTTKR. 



rendered inviolable, by constituting those who break them 
felons. That is the only way we can see left to bring public 
servants back to a realization of the fact that he la B 
scoundrel who accepts the terms of a trust with the inten- 
tion of violating them. Bonor and integrity must be 
brought back again into the transaction of public business, 
- and evasions of truth of every kind must be rendered un- 
bearably odious. Outraged public opinion must find a 
way to make itself felt. No pledge breaker should find 
comfort in the kingdom of this world, just as he will find 
none in the kingdom of the other. The daily press should 
do its duty, and that is to tell the truth, whether it be 
good or evil, about public men, to the end that the good 
may be sustained, whilst the evil are brought under the 
blistering force of public scorn. The public tergiversa tor 
should be avoided, and all good citizens would do well to 
rise to a higher sense of the necessity of insisting upon in- 
tegrity in all public employees. We are tolerating too 
low a moral plane in men occupying public station. It is 
outrageous that the cost of governing this city should go 
on increasing at the rate it is, and without any proposed 
improvements. The city's taxes during all these hard 
times have been almost unbearable and the marvel is that 
tbey have been borne. Verily, we are a long suffering 
people! Has not the time fully arrived when patience has 
ceased to be a virtue? It is said that we can do nothing 
without a new charter. That happens not to be a fact. 
There are a lot of useless deputies the city need not em- 
ploy unless it wants to. Their employment is by law 
simply permitted, not demanded. There are expenditures 
in almost every department that are wasteful, extrava- 
gant, and, in all too many instances, fraudulent. We talk 
about civic pride; if we would but invoke a little of it the 
Augean Stable at the City Hall could be cleansed without 
much more ado. 

Consular Service. The Consular service of this country 
needs remodeling upon civil service 
lines. The United States is struggling to extend its com- 
merce and increase the volume of its foreign trade, but 
under the pernicious system at present in force, the effect- 
iveness of the service is greatly impaired. Every change 
in the administration practically means a complete revol- 
ution in its foreign representatives — a custom which re- 
sults in comparative disorganization and direct commer- 
cial loss. President McKinley, in some of his selections, 
has shown excellent judgment; but in others he has been 
guided by the political necessity of party and the influence 
of applicants. The true interests of America demand con- 
tinued service under civil service rules. A thorough 
knowledge of the language, the customs, the products, 
and commercial necessities of the nations to which Consuls 
are sent are the qualifications required. These are ob- 
tained only through prolonged personal contact. Once 
thoroughly in touch with all these material conditions, our 
officials are able to represent efficiently the trade of the 
country abroad. A case in point is the position at Pek- 
ing, long and acceptably held by Charles Denby, who has 
just been displaced by a gentleman from Minnesota. Denby 
was a Cleveland appointee who escaped the Harrison ad- 
ministration. His valued labors at that important post 
demonstrate the wisdom of continued foreign service. 
The spoils system is vicious in principle wherever in force, 
and it is especially disastrous to the commercial interests 
of the United States in its application to the Consular de- 
partment of the country. 

False Cries in The little misunderstanding between 
Aid of Hawaii and Japan has come in the very 

Annexation. nick of time. It is doing immense ser- 
vice as a bugaboo with which to push 
annexation with undue haste. Yet Japan, in the most 
formal manner, has assured our Government that it never 
had, and was never likely to have, designs upon Hawaiian 
territory. It simply complains that annexation would 
sweep away its acquired treaty rights, as it undoubtedly 
would. Under the same circumstances we should say pre- 
cisely the same thing, but probably in not so moderate a 
tone. Certain of our jiugo dailies are proclaiming that 
Japan is "impertinent," "cheeky" and should "be taught 
a lesson." What is that but the bullying of a little boy by 
a big one? It is no answer, but is bulldozing pure and 



simple. It should be remembered that Japan is to-day in 
ti e family of nations to stay. By her wonderful ieup 
forward in civilization, by her valor, and her marvelous 
commercial progress, she has extorted the respect of 
mankind. It ill becomes any civilized people to treat her 
with disdain or contempt, much less to trample upon her 
equitable rights. It would not be worthy of us as a Deople 
to do the latter, even if a thousand Hawaiis were to be 
gained thereby. Besides, it is not worth while to make 
an enemy of Japan in the interests of a mere handful of 
greedy planters". We may not care to reckon with this 
view of the case to-day, but the time may come when we 
shall regret our preseot failure to do so. If we had any 
real need of Hawaii it might be said that the end sanctified 
the means. But for that home of leprous Kanakas and 
scrofulous planters, we have no particular need. The 
only thing we really have some use for we have already 
got. For the purposes of commerce, rather than for 
those of war, we require a coaling station there, and we 
have secured it. What further do we want? Is it the 
killing of our beet sugar industry that we are hankering 
after? Is it the commingling with a leprous people and 
the management of their Molokai that are so much to our 
taste? Is it that we have taken to believing in the gov- 
ernment of the many by the few, that is driving us for- 
ward on a jingo course full of peril? We believe that it will 
prove a bad and sad departure from the safe and sound 
policy of the founders of our nation to accept this incon- 
gruous alliance. We think it will be a source of eternal 
worry and weakness-to have to govern and defend these 
comparatively worthless islands, distant 2,100 miles from 
our mainland, and 5,100 miles from our seat of govern- 
ment. We are very sure this project is born of the greed 
of a few, and that the money there is in sugar is the "push" 
that is putting it through. The development of our beet 
sugar industry is worth more to California than the pos- 
session of all the islands in the Pacific. On that ground 
alone we would be content to rest the case against this 
wretched job. 

The Mines To It begins to look as if the News Letter's 
Bring predictioa that the coming booms in the 

Good Times, mines, would be among the earliest 
causes of bringing back good times to the 
whole of this Pacific Coast region, were upon the very 
point of realization. With remarkable Randsburg to the 
South of us, fabulous Clondyke to the North, and increas- 
ing developments all along the line of mining ventures, a 
mining boom is almost upon us that promises to assume 
dimensions beyond the hopes of the most sanguine. There 
is plainly no mistake this time about the vast field opened up 
on a fork of the Yukon River within British Columbia 
Territory. It is truly said that money talks, but it may 
with equal accuracy be declared that the coming to hand 
of gold dust tells of the richness of the camp whence it 
comes. There can be no mistake about the sudden dis- 
coveries at Clondyke, the news of which has just broken in 
upon us. The first shipment is just to hand by the Steamer 
Excelsior and amounts to over $1,000,000. All accounts 
agree that the field is a vast one, and something more than 
enthusiasm is expressed by the miners. The first adven- 
turers, now numbering about 3,000, appear to be men of 
the right stamp; strong, hardy, honest, and well disposed 
towards new comers. The News Letter has always been 
conservative in boasting new mining camps, and has in- 
variably recommended the awaiting of further and fuller 
details. But there is no mistaking the evidences from 
Clondyke. As we have said, the gold dust is here and 
much more is coming. There being no telegraphic com- 
munication with the place we have been fed with no sen- 
sational and preliminary reports, but the broad facts are 
here upon us without cavil or dispute. It would be folly 
on the part of employed workers who are earning a fair 
wage to give up a certainty for even a strong possibility, 
but men who are either unprofitably employed or not em- 
ployed at all, caunot do better than to turn their steps to- 
wards some one of the many mining camps around us. 
The mines will quickly bring us a return of good times, if 
we will but go to work at them. The Colony of Victoria, 
in Australia, doubled her gold output from $20,000,000 to 
$40,000,000 in one year, and mainly by supplying her un- 
employed with mining outfits. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July t7, 1897. 



Cecil Rhodes Of course somebody had to be held respon- 
The sible for the indefensible raid by Jamieson 

Scapegoat. into the Transvaal. Cecil Rhodes has 
been made the scapegoat to bear the sins 
of that period. He furnished the money, provided the 
men, and as Military Governor of Matabeleland instructed 
his subordinate officer, Jamieson, as to theduties expected 
of him, although he (Rhodes) did not actually order the 
start and was not present when it was made; he being at 
a distant part of the territory at the time. Jamieson re- 
ceived important despatches from the Uitlander com- 
mittee at Johannesburg that all was ready, and thought it 
his duty, under the circumstances, to proceed, which he 
did, only to meet disaster, though after as gallant a stand 
as is recorded in the annals of warfare. Hud he succeeded 
in reaching Johannesburg, or had the Johannesburgers gone 
out but a short distance to meet him, the result must al- 
most necessarily have been different, and then "if treason 
but succeed who dares call it treason." The Royal com- 
mission that has been investigating the subject for 
months past, finds that if the Uitlanders in the Transvaal 
had by themselves attempted by force of arms to redress 
their grievances, there would have been much excuse for 
them, but the descent of outsiders, who had no grievances 
to redress, is denounced in unmeasured terms. Our 
meagerly informed dailies, or some of them, almost invari- 
ably speak of Rhodes as a Hritish officer acting under the 
British Government's instructions. It need hardly be said 
that such was not the case. He was the bead of the 
South African Company, and the Premier of the self 
governing colony at the Cape. As a genius for colonizing 
he is a man of distinguished force and ability, as well as a 
rule unto himself. He has made himself the overshadow- 
ing power in South Africa. His purpose he does not dis- 
guise, but avows that his desire is to erect all that region 
into an independent Republic of States like unto our own. 
He cares not a snap for the Government of the mother 
country which is powerless to suppress him so long as the 
voters at the Cape support him as they do. There is no 
part of the British imperial system so likely to break down 
as that at South Africa, and Cecil Rhodes is the brilliant, 
but uneasy spirit that is feared in that connection. 

A Check To Cunning rascals as ever were born are 
The Chinese these Chinese resident amongst us. When 
Slave Trade. John H. Wise was about to step down and 
out, and Colonel John P. Jackson about to 
come into the Collector's office, the slave importers here 
telegraphed to their agents in China to cease sending any 
more women until matters at this port could be fixed. 
They did not know the new collector, nor his deputies. 
Accordingly, there is an almost total cessation of this un- 
desirable class of immigration. How long will it la^t? 
Under Hager, Phelps and Wise, tbey prettv soon suc- 
ceeded in securing, for a consideration, the aid of inside 
deputies, and not all the best efforts of their superiors 
sufficed to break up the business. Several deputies were 
found out, disgraced and ruined, but the rascallv trade 
went on just the same. This experience will no doubt 
serve as a lesson to Collector Jackson, who is nothing if 
not astute and energetic. If he can circumvent the heathen 
Chinee in this matter to the end of his term, he will deserve 
more credit than any of his predecessors won. Whilst 
the law is the law, it ought to be rendered effective for its 
purpose. At the same time many thoughtful citizens are 
beginning to doubt its wisdom under existing conditions. 
Whilst there are some 28,000 Chinese males in our citv, 
there are not over 1,000 females of that race. The effect 
upon other races we leave to students of sociology to 
discuss. 

A Good At a recent meeting of the Merchants As- 
Suggestion. sociation it was determined that the efforts 
of the organization should be directed tn an 
improvement of the business of its members, which really 
means the entire mercantile community. The Association, 
in its collective and individual'character, has struggled to 
improve lights, deau streets, and lift San Francisco out of 
the old order of things and place the citv in the pro 
ive ranks of the great centers of the world. Much hag been 
done by this powerful association of business men. Their 
influence has been felt in many practical ways, but al- 



ways for the public good. Now it is proposed to inaugu- 
rate a series of excursions to San Francisco from various 
interior points; to offer special inducements and cultivate 
closer relations with the country. Operating together, 
the Merchants' Association will be able to accomplish re- 
sults that would be unattainable otherwise. In their 
efforts the merchants will have the hearty co-operation of 
the people and the press. Being successful business men, 
they will adopt lines of action that are practical and pro- 
ductive of substantial gain. 

A Convention The coming of the Endeavorers has proved 
City. that San Francisco should be called the 

summer convention city of the United 
States. The meeting of last week was held, its business 
transacted in comfort, and the wints of every visitor sup- 
plied. This city played with eminent success the part of 
host to all these guests, and did it with a grace, gener- 
osity, and completeness that sent them homeward with 
nothing but words of praise and pleasant memories. The 
railroads hauled the immense bodies of delegates with 
promptness, the Southern Pacific especially demonstrating 
its ability to meet all emergencies; and the thirty thousand 
Endeavorers praised God with the thermometer within 
speaking distance, and thought of the sweltering heat of 
every other large city in America. The objections urged 
against San Francisco's demands for the great political 
conventions — those of transportation and accommodations, 
have been met and more than answered. 



THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDEN. 

THE people of San Francisco have at last awakened to 
the fact that they should have a zoological garden, 
and the general desire is that it should be located in the 
Mission. The Western Addition has Golden Gate Park, 
but the great district south of Market street, while pay , 
ing nearly half of the taxes, has been neglected. It is 
time that the city should secure property for a garden. 
The opportunity for a suitable purchase is naturally lim- 
ited, for it is difficult to get a tract big enough for the 
future that is advantageously located for economical 
improvement. The 145 acres which is offered to the city for 
the "Zoj" by Baldwin & Howell, the real estate dealers, 
seems to meet the requirements well. The tract is large 
enough, and its topographical position is ideal. It is ac- 
cessible from the heart of the city, and by an economical 
expenditure could be connected by boulevard with the 
whole system of Darks about the city. The firm has had 
prepared accurate maps and drawings, giving the rela- 
tions of this property to the city and the suburbs, which 
clearly show its admirable adaptability to the purposes 
desired. 

MARRIAGE OF MR. AND MRS. A. B. McCREERY. 

IX an article which appeared in the News Letter of 
May 22nd last, under the caption of "notable mar- 
riages," reference was made to the extreme simplicity of 
the marriage of Miss Isabelle Swearingen and Andrew B. 
McCreery, the well-known millionaire, and it was stated 
that there were only a couple of friends present. This 
was an error, the facts being as follows: 

The wedding occurred at Grace Church on the evening 
of the 4th of January, 1865, in the presence of from forty 
to fifty relatives and invited guests. The ceremony was 
performed by the Rev. Mr. Goodman, the then rector of 
the church," Julius C. McCeeney and Jos. G. Eastland 
were the groomsmen, the Misses Sallie and Mary Swear- 
ingen bridesmaids, and the bride was given away by her 
uncle, .Mr. Sydney Swearingen. A sumptuous supper 
followed, and the next morning Mr. and Mrs. McCreery 
left on their bridal trip for New York, via Panama, on 
the steamer Golden Age, of which the gallant and popular 
Commodore Watkins was commander. 



GOLDSTEIN & Cohn, importers of human hair and 
>ves, at 822 .Market street, make a specialty of ladies' 
and children's hair cutting, the manufacture of wigs, 
switches, and curls. Masquerade and theatrical wigs to 
let, and combings made up in anv style. Country orders 
are promptly filled. 

When playing poker drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



July 17, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



A GRAND DEDICATION. 

THE beautiful completed rotunda of the City Hah was 
dedicated to public use last Monday with appropriate 
and interesting exercises. A musical programme w; ls 
rendered afternoon and evening under the able direction of 
John Marquardt, an appropriate address was made by 
Mayor Phelan, and the new dome was delivered by the 
gratified contractors to the city and duly accepted. The 
magnificent rotunda was seen by thousands of visitors anil 
citizens during the afternoon and evening, ami nothing 
but expressions of amazement and delight were heard. 
This completed dome is unique for several reasons, among 
which are the facts that it is really a most beautiful 
piece of public work, complete, perfect, and symmetri- 
cal in every particular; that it is largely composed of a 
native material gracefully designed and skillfully joined 
together. Further, it is the cheapest public work ever 
done in San Francisco; and the city received a full dollar's 
value for every dollar paid out. Whether the money went 
into the highly polished Travertine marble of which the 
lower rotunda wainscoting is composed; the flooring of 
the ample galleries; the wide staircase of fine veined white 
marble from Amador Quarries, or the rich green wains- 
coting of the second gallery, from the Kimball mine of 
San Diego, all placed by Wm. H. McCormick; the carpen- 
ter work of heavy antique oak, the rich woodwork, the 
frames, doors and windows, and the decorations and paint- 
ings by James F. Leahy, of Leahy Bros.; the metal of 
copper, ornamental ribs of the dome, and the construction 
work by the San Francisco Novelty and Plating Works; — 
and lastly the magnificent leaded dome — every dollar paid 
was faithfully and richly earned. Standing beneath it, (the 
largest stained glass dome in the world), the visitor is made 
to appreciate the possibilities of leaded stained glass as a 
decorative scheme on a great scale, when conceived and 
executed by competent artists and craftsmen. The Pa- 
cific American Decorative Company, organized by Mr. 
John Mallon, have availed themselves of this opportunity 
to show what can and should be done to realize an effect 
at once rich without gaudiness, delicate without weakness, 
and harmonious without monotony — the reflections in the 
polished marbles on every hand carrying the color scheme 
throughout in unique effectiveness. 

The people of San Francisco were proud of the oppor- 
tunity thus presented to show the thousands of visitors 
who thronged the rotunda what the skill of their contrac- 
tors and the native materials of their State could create, 
and shared with the builders of the great rotunda the 
honest pride they felt. Ten thousand souvenir programmes 
were distributed by the contractors, and as many more 
could have been disposed of if they had been printed. The 
exercises were in all ways an immense success, much of 
the credit being due to Wm. H. Leahy, who prepared the 
excellent musical programme and superintended the spec- 
ial decorations of the rotunda. This dome will stand as an 
enduring monument to the civic pride of the city and the 
integrity of the men whose ability created it. Among the 
many contractors who have done work for San Francisco 
these should stand out in bold letters, as having completed 
the most beautiful public improvement in this State: 

The San Francisco Novelty and Plating Works, at 68 
to 74 First street. 

The Travertine Marble Works, at 28 Eighth street. 

Wm. H. McCormick, 115 City Hall avenue. 

The Pacific American Decorative Company, at 26 O'Far- 
rell street, John Mallon, secretary and treasurer. 

James F. Leahy, of Leahy Bros. , at 505 Parrott Building. 

Joseph McKenna, decorative expert. 

Frank T. Shea, of Shea & Shea, architect. 



' The interesting art store of George T. Marsh, at 625 Market street, 
under the Palace hotel, was visited by many thousands of 
Eastern people during the past week — many of whom purchased 
liberally of their splendid stock of rare Japanese art goods, curious 
and carvings. These goods are the finest collection of distinctly 
Japanese wares to be found in the United States. 



Natty neckwear, finest furnishing goods, and latest styles at Car- 
many's, 25 Kearny street. 



Fine stationery, steel and oopper-plate engraving. Cooper & Co., 746 
Market street, San Francisco. 



TAMALPAIS. 

WITH this issue the ,\ kws LXITXB presents a beautiful 
view of the Tavern at the summit of Mt. Tamalpais, 
and one of tin many ri mantic oits of scenery along the 
railway leading to it. From the Tavern may be obtained a 
most inspiring view. To the north roll away miles upon 
niilrs of undulating hills, presenting a blending of sunshine 
and shadow, of bronzed slopes and wooded valleys; quiet 
water stretching inland between the rugged shoulders of 
the hills, lies like melted lead beneath the sun; and, through 
the still <1 stances, the dotted landscape looms distinct and 
clear. The ocean frets noiseless at your feet and draws 
away to the bending horizon. As the delighted eye com- 
pletes this circle of earth, and air, and water — of rugged 
grandeur and peaceful vale — the visitor admits the charm 
and absorbing interest of the view. At night the scene 
changes, and, as evening falls, the landscape slowly melts. 
From the broad veranda of the hotel one may see the sun 
drown in the sea, and mark the lights of the cities about 
the bay burst into flame and glow and glitter like dia- 
monds in a crescent. 

The Tavern is well prepared for visitors. Its tables 
are first-class, its apartments comfortable, the charge for 
entertainment reasonable, and guests receive every atten- 
tion. The scenic railway makes four round trips on week 
days and six on Sundays. The little journey is delightful 
from beginning to end, and it is becoming more and more 
popular as the grandeur of the scenery and the perfect 
services at the tavern are becoming better known. Resi- 
dents of the city can leave this side at 5:15 in the evening, 
see the sunset and sunrise the following morning, and get 
back at 9:15 ready for business. 



GREAT preparations are being made for a grand party 
at Hotel Mateo, which takes place this evening. The 
grounds, the cottages, and the hotel will be brilliantly 
lighted, and Japanese lanterns and rare potted plants will 
give an added beauty to the hour. Many society people 
are going to San Mateo from the city in order to be pres- 
ent at the party, and these, together with the local atten- 
dance, will make up a gay and delightful throng. It will 
undoubtedly be the prettiest party ever given at Mana- 
ger Shepard's popular hotel. 



JUST three miles from TJkiah, the terminus of the San 
Francisco and North Pacific Railway, is situated the 
popular summer resort, "Vichy Springs, whose famous 
Vichy waters are known everywhere. Here are the 
champagne baths, supplied by a continuous flow of natural 
warm water. Guests are surrounded by every comfort, 
and their wants carefully supplied. A week at Vichy 
Springs is equal to a new lease of life. 



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Sold by all Stationers. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 17, 1897. 




!■ / I* ^ V 




.' ..'■■-:■: -/ 

"We obey no wand but pleasure's."— Tom Jtoore. 

" M I; CASTELIiO" is better late than 
J 1 never. It is a comfortable little 
farce, and it strengthens my belief thai it 
is not the clothes that make the play. 
With the exception of last week's curtain- 
raiser, this is the only instance of the sea- 
son's buying where Mr. Daniel Frohman has not preferred 
dry goods to brains. The aspiring dramatist will note, 
possibly with regret, that this farce, light and simple 
though it is, comes from the imagination (if a famous 
dramatic artist — Sydney Grundy, of the big British trin- 
ity, Pinero, Grundy and Jones. Still the aspiring dram- 
atist need not lose heart: a street's breadth from the 
Baldwin Theatre is playing Christopher Jr., another farce- 
comedy that in points of story, execution, practical literary 
value, or any of the qualities by which plays are appre- 
ciated, beats Tin Late Mr. Castello out of his tomb. This 
is not to gainsay the jolly worth of Mr. Grundy's piece, 
nor to spread the American eagle gratuitously. I merely 
want to avoid saying that Mr. Castello is too good. And 
then, if anybody wants to know what, for heaven's sake, 
is good enough for such clammy, cavilling fastidiousness, 
I can point to little Mrs. Ryley, who is being represented 
around the corner. 

But Christopher Jr. is an old story to San Franciscans; 
what concerns us is Tin Late Mr. Castello, which crept out 
softly at the tail end of the Lyceum season and surprised 
the manager, the actors, and everybody in the theatre. 
The tale is told daintily and immediately — up to the last 
act. Now in Christopher Jr.. written by a modest little 
American woman, who, up to a month or so ago, could not 
even atTord a husband, the last act is wonderful. It never 
errs; there is no slack; the interest is quick and fierce; 
you are suspended in excitement, yet you feel no insecurity; 
you put your nerves trustfully into Mrs. Rviey's hands, 
and she never betrays you, though she is handling a whirl- 
wind of a plot. However you know as much as I about 
Mrs. Ryley's play; John Drew and Maude Adams tried it 
on here to instantaneous favor a long time ago, and it 
was two years (I think it was two years) after that before 
Charles Frohman dared it in New York, where it ran a 
season and did much to educate the town, though the signs 
of this are not visible now, and even Mr. ( astello was 
coldly received there last winter — But as I was saying. Mr. 
Grundy's farce is to be admired for the compact interest 
it compels in three acts — or I should say, two acts and a 
little over — of the taming of a Hirty young widow by a 
precociously clever young man. Between herself and all 
mortal clay the young woman draws the shadow of her 
late Mr. Castello, who is supposed to have been eaten by 
big game. Her weeds have all the traditioual seduction 
for the hearts of men, and she works them sedulously; her 
pathway is strewn with blighted hopes. The precocious 
Captain Trefusis is sighed upon by this demure young 
woman in black, and he rises to the occasion by kissing 
her in Act I.; whereupon she immediately engages herself 
to a fussy old gentleman who has that day made applica- 
tion in writing. 

The Captain surprises her into admitting that she cared 
not a rap for Castello, and he talks to her constantly of 
some young woman whom he had loved in the past, but 
who had jilted him. He even calls Mrs. Castello by his 
first love's name. He says, banteringly, that he is a man' 
of honor, and, since the kissing was discovered, he will offer 
her marriage. Here she makes him vow there is on-ly one 
girl and so forth — and then springs upon him her engage- 
ment with the fussy old party who made application in 
writing and referred her to his banker and physician for 
financial and physical guarantees. 

Now comes the last act, which involves, as a famous 
dramatic critic— Aristotle— has termed it, " the untying 
of the knot," together with, to use another technicality of 
his. "a change into the reverse of what is expected from 
the circumstances of the action." [For these excellent 



translations of difficult Greek terms I am indebted to Pro- 
fessor A. M. Ward, of Owens College, Manchester.] I 
cannot but say in passing that Mrs. Ryley's Christopher 
Jr. will stand scrutation by any of the dramaturgic maxims 
of Aristotle, or comparison with even Sophocles's classic 
construction. 

So in order to untie the knot and effect a change into 
the reverse of what is to be expected from the circumstan- 
ces of the action, this gay young Captain in Mr. Grundy's 
play bursts upon .Mrs. Castello's aged fiance with no less 
statement than that he, Trefusis, is the supposedly dead 
Castello, and ha- leath to observe the conduct of 

his wife under such circumstances. The old gentleman 
nearly has heart failure, and agrees to marry his mother- 
in-law to- was, and the scene is uproariously successful. 
Only Mr>. Castello has not been considered. The Captain, 
as a last resort, has delivered to her a telegram purport- 
ing to be from Castello, announcing his life and asking for 
enough money to come home on. This is where the taming 
takes place. She doesn't want Castello; she loathes him; 
she wants Trefusis. Will he take her away, now, any- 
where '.' C11 rs.es are heard in the court below. She is 
sure it is Castello quarreling with ihe cabby. Trefusis 
rushes out; choice Castellonian oaths are vaguely rumbling 
up the hallway. She faints and recovers in the arms of 
Trefusis, who has won the final battle. 

In the skeleton this sounds as reasonable perhaps as the 
husband and wife who do not know one another's identity 
until the last minute of the last act of Christopher Jr. But 
it isn't in reality. You feel uncertain — at least, I feel un- 
certain — and nervous at the way Mr. Grundy handles his 
final expedients. He seems to get into a tangle untying 
that knot. You think of play-making, of all its devices 
and machinery, and you lose the illusion and grow fretful, 
whereas your soul should be rushing on to know the sequel, 
as it does in Mrs. Ryley's play. Of course Frank Worth- 
ing, who plays Christopher, is a better comedian than 
James K. Hackett, who plays Trefusis, and he takes the 
home stretch with surer speed; but Mr. Hackett without 
his upholstery, is a seemly young modern, and his cock- 
sure airs are not so glaringly out of place in a cock-sure 
character. Nevertheless he has a way of imparting his 
opinion of himself to the audience, and the way is very 
annoying. Mr. Hackett suffers for an intelligent, fear- 
less stage director. The Frawleys need capable stage 
management to an even greater extent. It is not so much 
by comparison with the individual work of other actors as 
it is with the ensemble that Christopher Jr. at the Colum- 
bia is not up to the value of John Drew's production. I am 
conscious of the difficulties in producing new plays week 
after week in a stock season, but the man who sits in front 
has only results to judge, and I cannot help observing that 
the Frawley company, which numbers exceptional individ- 
ual strengths, is continuously and palpably weak in the en- 
sembles. And while Mr. Enos should surely be criticised 
for applying the wobbles and dodders to every sort of 
character part that he undertakes, and Miss Wallis for 
playing half-heartedly at any time, the general work is 
excellent — too good, and, to be practical, too expensive to 
lack that keen human atmosphere that only comes to the 
thoroughly managed stage. Mr. Worthing's Christopher 
is good acting and original acting; if it lacks the volatility 
and the concealed strenuousness of John Drew's, that is 
because Mr. Worthing is not quite the best drawing-room 
actor in America. It is the same with Miss Bates in Miss 
Adams's part: she acts with genuine feeling, and there 
is scarcely a moment when you could ask or expect more 
of her — and it is in no way belittling Miss Bates to say 
that she has neither the unique temperament nor the dra- 
matic expertness of Maude Adams. 

At the Baldwin, where Mr. Hackett proves nightly that 
there is no authoritative stage manager at hand either, 
there is at least a fair avowal from most of the little cast 
that The Lnh Mr. Castello was intelligently directed at the 
original production in New York, and that the good points 
are not entirely forgot. In fact the possibilities of this 
farce seem to be better realized than those of any other 
piece in the repertory. Miss Mannering, removed from 
the damp suggestion of sobs and sighs, has a personality 
that is cheerful, humorous, and comely. She plays Mrs. 
Castello with surprisingly good taste, her comedy is easy 
and telling, and she grasps the role with a deal of pretty 



July 17. 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



truth. John Kindla.v plays the "eccentric old man " part, 
the fussy, funny person indigenous to. one might say, in- 
separable from, the British drama; it is not a new charac- 
ter, and Mr. Kindly keeps it down to tradition with good 
detail and finish. Mrs. Vvalcott has the opposing role — 
the mother-in-law to-be — and she gives to it that best of 
ail distinctions — plausibility. 



As a serious-minded man said to me the other night, the 
drama is receiving a hard blow at the Tivoli's hands. 
There are other theatres that deal it an occasional biff, 
but the Tivoli seems to have monopolized the business 
lately, and now is about to enter on another long run of 
corruption and demoralization, and I can understand my 
serious friend's anxiety. 1 noticed, ton, that he was there 
with the rest of us Tuesday night from early to late, to 
make sure perhaps. The audience was shamelessly 
blithe; no one seemed to wot of expiring art. I realized 
the deplorable fact that San Franciscans persist in re- 
garding the play-house as a plaything, a recreation, a 
dissipation — that the didactic drama stands no show — that 
"Help us kill leisure" is the slogan of the crowd — that 
writers who feel in themselves infinite five-act possibilities 
either prostitute Heaven's gift by pandering to the disso- 
lute mob, or else fall to dramatic criticism and live out alow 
life of acid, protest and adjectives. But I must say that 
the Tivoli deals the death-blow with seductive elegance. 
The show is large, rich and opulent of fun; the prices are, 
as usual, beneath contempt — this is where the Tivoli gets 
in its deadly work. How is the uplifting, ennobling drama 
to compete? You might as well try to fight free whiskey 
with paid pews. 

The Isle of Ohampigne is three glittering acts of non- 
sense, in which Edwin Stevens, as King Mumm II., an un- 
respected monarch of a waterless isle, is the central 
figure. The book is by Chas. Byrne and Louis Harrison; 
the lines are funny, the situations immense. The music, 
written by W. W. Furst before he had reached his present 
state of potboilarity, is springy and helpful, and beautifully 
scored. The actors are the present Tivolites at their 
best, as good a light opera company, taken all the way 
through, as you will find in the land. Altogether it is an 
insinuating deflection from the drama. 

In Wang there was a disposition to compare Edwin 
Stevens to De Wolf Hopper, because Hopper had played 
the part. In The Isle you will forget that there ever was 
a Hopper. Hopper is a man of one distinct personality; 
Stevens is limitless. His Mumm is no kin to his Wang. 
Alike as the two parts could be made to be, Mumm is a 
stranger and a wonder. Until Mr. Stevens assails a new 
role you are sure that this is the funniest work be has ever 
done — and this smashing obliteration of the critical faculty, 
where you ignore past and future, strikes me as being due 
to particularly vivid characterization on the paitofthe 
actor. 

The support is all that any enemy of the higher 
stage could ask for. Mrs. Seabrooke especially is very 
undermining. I found quite a little rapture for the deli- 
cate way in which she played the Puritan maid; and her 
voice, with that cunning baby thrill in it, never sounded 
sweeter. Mr. West — another sinner of versatility and 
value — committed a flagrant satire on the heavy man of 
approved play-writing, which was received with cruel de- 
light; and Mr. Raffael and Mr. Thomas sang wantonly well. 
In fact, the only person in the cast who seemed to me un- 
dangerous was Miss Morella, who wanted the center of 
the stage, and the attention of the audience, and crowded 
for one and smiled and smirked for the other, and did as 
much as one lone woman could do to break up the deliber- 
ate guile that lies in this show. But Miss Morella is not 
strong enough for the task. Ashton Stevens. 



The demand for the First Born was so strong at the Al- 
cazar that it has been continued together with A Victim of 
Circumstances for another week. Rosedale is positively an- 
nounced for Monday night with Francis Carlyle in the 
principal part. The Alcazar enjoys great luck. Just as 
the Chinese play is about to depart Miss Johnson is ac- 
costed by a bogus baron, who is magnificently thrashed by 
the manager — the newspapers do the rest. 

The Isle of Champagne is up for a long run at the Tivoli 



The particular hits of the new bill at the Orpheum are 
landed by Perry and Burns, who have an amusing talk 
over the telephone, ami Charles Whyte. who sings bass 
solos. Imogene Comer sings a new melodrama, and In, 
Dockstader continues to be as big a favorite as he was a 
month ago. It is good to hear that Dockstader has con- 
sented to play another week — this makes one of the long- 
est, and surely the must popular, engagement in the his- 
tory of the ( Irpheum. Three promising turns for next 
week: Ouda, the serial artist; Ida Gray Scott; and Fran- 
cis J. Bryant, monologueist. 

1 >ne of the best character plays extant is Mayo's dram- 
atization of Pudd'nhead Wilson, which goes on at the Col- 
umbia next week. Mr. Hamilton, who succeeded Frank- 
Mayo in the role of Pudd'nhead and Miss Moretti, whose 
Eoxy is a bit of dramatic history, will play their original 
parts. Mr. Hamilton will doubtless stage the piece, and 
a good performance is expected of the Frawley company. 

The Lyceum Company will give a good-bye performance 
of The Prisoner of Zenda at the Baldwin to-night, after 
which the theatre closes for two weeks. The new season 
opens with John Drew and Rosemary. 

An old Argonaut returned to this city with the Christian En- 
deavorers last week after an absence of forty-nine years. He isn't 
in it, however, with Argonaut whiskey, which is regarded as the fin- 
est liquor sold on the Coast. It gets better with age and its sale 
throughout the country is rapidly increasing. E. Martin & Co., at 
411 Market street, are sole Pacific Coast Agents. 



Jackson's Napa Soda is a gentle aperient. 

G,-, I. ., ,,,,!-, ! TL„,J The" Gem" Theatre of the Coast. 
OlUmDia I neatXe- Friedlander, Gottlob&Co., Lessees 
and Managers. 
Monday, July 19, and during the week, the Frawley Company. 
in the dramatization of M ark Twain's quaint story, 

PUDD'NHEAD WILSON. 

July 26th— The Case of Rebellious Susan. 

r\\ f~r 1 1 Belasco & La Faille, Lessees and Man- 

r\ICaZar I neatre. agers; Mark Thall, Director. 

Monday. July 19th— Entire week; matinee Saturday. Positive 
appearance of 

MR. FRANCIS GARLYLE, 

in Lester Wallack's masterpiece, ROSEDALE. with the en- 
tire Alcazar Company in the cast 



Tivoli Opera House. 



Orph 



Mrs. Ernestine Kbelino. 

Proprietor and Manager 

The Edwin Stevens comic opera season. Every evening, a 
brilliant production of the sparkling comedy opera, 

THE ISLE OF CHAMPAGNE. 

Edwin Stevens as King Mumm; catchy music, great cast, grand 
ballets, superb scenery, costumes, and effects. 
Popular Prices ... 25c and 50o 

San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell 
6 U m ■ street, between Stockton and Powell s treete . . 
Week commencing Monday, July 19th. Direct from the Antipo- 
des, 

OUDA, 

the world famous aerial artist: Miss Ida Gray Scott, the cele- 
brated soprano, Franois J Bryant, monologueist; positively 
last week of Mr. Lew Dockstader Imogene Comer. Smith 
& Fuller. Lillian Ptrry, Harry Le Clair, and Perry & Burns. 
A great big show. 

Reserved seats, 25c ; balcony 10c ; opera cbairs and box seats 50c. 

Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. Matinee Prices: 

Parquet, any seat, 25c; balcony any seat, 10c; children, 10o M 

any part. 

For a first-class Fish, For a first-class Hunt, 

For a first-class Camp, 

For a delightful rest at some beautiful Resort, 

Go to that country tributary to the 



Free Camping Grounds, 
Clean, Comfortable Hotels, 
Moderate prices within the 
reach of all. 
Low Railroad Rates. 



oan Francisco and 
9forth Pacific *%. 



For detailed information apply at TICKET OFFICE: 650 MARKET ST., 
(Chronicle Building), or GENERAL OFFICE: Cor. Sansome and Califor- 
nia streets. 

A. W. FOSTER, Pres. and Gen'l Mgr. R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass. Agt 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 17, 1897. 




KABEL vya-rRifK 3n//V°«r= 



MANSON had never liked the coffee-and-cognae table 
d'hote of Marliave's, with its small tables huddled to- 
gether, and its vin-ordinaire-drinking habitutt. He did 
not like it to-night, but Nanine did, so that was why he 
was there. She was very much spoiled. Every one said 
so, and then went on to spoil her still more. Just now 
Jack Manson was wasting his time in the pleasant, but 
dangerous occupation. 

"What next?" asked Manson, as Amiel brought the 
black coffee, with the inevitable crackers and cheese. 

"I don't care," replied Nanine, indolently; "anything 
you please, but green chartreuse." 

" H'm !" said Manson, surprised. "What's up? Don't 
you like it?" 

"Ob, yes," answered Nanine. "I like it, ot course." 
And then, with a certain stress of intonation: "I like it 
too well to drink it " 

"With me I" Manson finished the sentence deliberately. 
" Is that it, Nanine ? " 

Nanine never blushed nor dropped her eyes under any 
consideration. So now, she looked straight into Manson's 
eyes, which were fixed upou hers in calculating scrutiny. 

"Yes,"' she replied unwaveringly. "You're right, 
Jack. That's it!" 

"H'm," said Manson, again. This time he laughed 
lightly. " This is interesting. How long since ? " 

Nanine's eyes had wandered from his face. " How long 
since, did you say ? " She questioned, lazily. "Ob, don't 
be alarmed. It's only a memory of mine. They will come 
up sometimes, you know. But they pass quickly ! " 

Manson lighted his cigarette. 

"Nanine," he exclaimed suddenly, "you don't mean 
you've ever — but no — that's absurd." He threw back his 
head and laughed. 

The girl joined in the laugh, as she watched the cognac 
in the coffee burning with its tbin blue Same. " Yes, 'tis 
absurd, isn't it ? " she assented. " But it's true ! " 

" Nanine in love ?" repeated Manson, half to himself. 
"I wouldn't have believed it. Nanine, how long did it 
last? I'm curious." 

"Too curious, Monsieur," said Nanine, her eyes flashing 
a little. " What difference does it make, now? Now — is 
you ! " leaning her elbows on the table, and looking at him 
through half-closed eyes over her cordial glass. Her tone 
and manner were filled with a delicious challenge. 

Manson breathed a little faster than usual. "Are you 
sure, Nanine ? " he u'ged with a change of tone. 

"Don't be silly, Jack!" said Nanine, becoming silent. 
Suddenly she set down her glass and touched Manson again 
on the sleeve. 

"Jack," she said, a little unsteadily, "as long as this — 
memory — has come up, I want to tell you a little about it. 
I shall never want to speak of it again, perhaps." She" 
pressed her lips tightly together. "Jack, did you ever 
think enough about such women — about me, to know why 
I'm here with you to-night 1 " Manson was silent. "Well, 
it's because of a memory like this. It's because I have 
been what you call in love, and have given myself in ex- 
change for what I thought was love, love, I say." — her hand 
tightened on his arm. " Do you understand, Jack ? Do 
you know what it is to live only to love and be loved, to 
give more and more, until all is given, to wish there were 
more to give, and then to find out that — oh, what am I 
saying to you— you poor boy ? " And Nanine broke off 



suddenly and buried her face in her hands. When she 
raised it again, " Don't look as if you were at a stupid 
twelve course dinner, Jack," she cried. "And pass me 
the cigarettes, like a good child. There, now," selecting 
one, "light it for me ! And Amiel ! " to the waiter pass- 
ing by, "bring me a green chartreuse." 

"And Monsieur?" inquired the watchful Amiel. 

Manson shivered slightly, and waved the man away. 

"Why, Jack," said Nanine, coolly. "What made you 
do that ? I don't care, now, you know ! " 

" Well, I suppose I'm a fool to care, Nanine, but I do." 
said Manson. 

" Yes, Jack, you are a fool," agreed Nanine, as she 
blew little smoke-rings slowly up into the heavy air. "And 
it never pays, you know. Never ! " 



ST the reception given to tbe Ohio, Michigan, and In- 
diana Endeavorers, at the First Congregational Church 
on the evening of the loth. Professor Graeber's mandolin 
club was heard with tbe greatest pleasure, and contrib- 
uted largely to the entertainment of that occasion. 

lit Tempered Babies 

are not desirable in any borne. Insufficient nourishment produces 
ill-temper. (luard against fretful children by feeding nutritious and 
digestible food. The Hail Borden Eagle Brand Condensed Milk is 
tbe most successful of all infant foods. 



Mothers, besure and use "Mrs. Wmslow's Soothing Syrup" for your 
children while teething^ 

Seasickness relieved by Taroena. It "stays down " At all druggists. 



HAVE YOUR 



Bathing suit 



KNIT TO ORDER We have them at all prices. 
TAILOR MADE 



Dictjcir, aims, an 

KNITajTINGCO. 



Bicycle Suits, Sweaters, Golf Hose, etc. 
103 POST ST., 

Near Kearny, 
Upstairs, 

San Francisco, 



UNITED STATES 
LAUNDRY. 



Office, 1004 Market Street. 



Telephone South 420. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Lfl GRANDE, LAUNDRY, 



Tel. Bush tit 



Principal Opfice— 23 Powell street, opp. Baldwin Hotel. 

Branch— n Taylor street, near Golden Gate avenue. 

Laundry— Fell streets, between Folsom and Howard. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Sells Burial Lots 
and Graves. 
Perpetual Care. 



LAUREL HILL 

Cemetery 
Association 



Junction of Bush 
street and 
Central avenue, 

San Francisco. 



n"*i Ol' XX" M Tne *& v orite resort. Music by the 

I R6 V-/ 1 1 T 1 (10 USC Venetian Troubadors every day 

Banquets Co- societies; private din- 
ners Regular table d'hote. 11 wilh bottle of wine. J M. Wii.kins prop. 

Gi j O i. \ / ' 1 1 Ocean Bkach. Cyclists' bead- 

OlQen Vjat6 Ullla quarters Private apartments; 
shuffle boards ; meals a la carte ; take 
Park and Ocean railroad, r. i. iVest 31. V. Le onhardt Jr & R. P. Hagerty 

dames P. Dunne X Go. 

No 1 Stockton street; also Market and Eddy Sts.S. F. 



July 17. 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 






v 1 1 1 i.s E who were pres- 
ent at Will Page's 
Ross Valley celebration on the Fourth Of July say that Betty 
Ash made an ideal Goddess of Liberty, with her statuesque 
style of feature, form, and expression. On 'Hi, efforts 
will be made to induce the young lady to repeat her pose 
for some ODe of the charitable institutions in which she 
takes interest A vicious old bach, commenting upon the 
tableaux that evening, remarked it was no new thing to 
see girls offered up in sacrifice now as well as in the Druidi- 
cal period. 

* * * 

If Rumor speaks by the card, Southard Hoffman is hard 
hit. and pretty May will also be likely to wed ere the com- 
ing winter waues. In the same neighborhood a sweet 
young bud, whose leaves are not yet opened to the swim, 
has captivated one of the Martin boys: but if it become an 
engagement and lasts as long as Belle McKenna's, the 
young girl will have time to become a veteran belle ere 

matrimony claims her. 

* # # 

The exemplary lives our married men are leading is 
being noted on all sides. No more French dinners <"' deux, 
no more street flirtations, no more attention to typewrit- 
ers or household servants, no use for the services of the 
suppression of vice — in fact, there beiDg no vice to suppress 
with them. This is as it should be, of course, but the 

query is, How long will this sort of thing last? 

* * * 

On 'lit, Mrs. Henry Schmieden is still the most stylish 
dresser to be found at the Hotel Rafael. That popular 
hotel keeps up its reputation for the most fashionable list 
of guests, the best cuisine, and the most enjoyable place 
1o spend a week, month, or a day. Mine Host Warfield 
does not let interest lag or moments pause on leaden feet. 

* # * 

" It was a foregone conclusion that once the queenly 
Emily domiciled in San Rafael our own Donald deV. would 
appear upon the scene," said a matron at the hotel last 
week; "and it was amusing to note how he turned his 
visit to account by giving a recital of songs at the opera 
house in the village." Well, it all goes. 

* # * 

A party of distinguished returned Jubileeans are re- 
ported as being about to pay a visit to the Coast. As they 
number some very distinguished, eminent names, our 
society will no doubt receive them with open arms, and our 

business community ditto. 

* # * 

Wiltsee's friend, Tom, is having quite a success with the 
women; so too is Fahnsdorff. There is no denying the 
fact that the men from the East are more apt to be 
society men than our local beaux. 

* * * 

"The curse of our land is that there is one law for the 
millionaire and another for the people," says the Nebraska 
orator Bryan. So, too, evidently, think hotel managers 

sometimes. 

* * * 

At long last Horace Piatt is said to be a captive to 
Cupid, and his numerous friends have been busily engaged 
in asking him if he was a subject for congratulation all last 

week. 

* # * 

People inclined to be inquisitive are wondering if the 
attraction which takes Wiltsee over to Sausalito so often 
these days is to be found at the Terrace. 

Pure Cosmetics — Professor WeDzell, the Pure Food Chemist, says of 
Mme. Marchand's Preparations Use Creme de la Creme. Positively pre- 
vents sunburn and poison oak. Price, 50 ots. 107 Geary street. 



Great Reduction in prices during the summer months on Art Goods, 
Plolures. Crockery, Glassware, etc. S. & G. Gump, 113 Geary street. 



Other waters try— Jackson's Napa Soda gets there. 
Bromo-Koi.a cures headaches, neuralgia, and nervous troubles. 



California Hotel » Hotel Rafael 



Absolutely Fireproof 

San Francisco ... Gal. > < San Rafael 

W3k\ 



Open all the year. Only M 
minutes from San Francisco. 



>lllllil|l|| llllimiiBMIIMllrllBiyill'lllll 1 l 



Two modern, exquisite, home-like first-class hotels, 
both under personal supervision of Gen. Warfield. 

R. ft. WARFIELD & GO., Proprietors. 



.xxmxx^xsxxKEBnaxxzix 



New York. 



Madison Square, Broadway and 23d 
Street. 



Under new management. Rooms slng'e or 
en suite. Restaurant unsurpassed. Ele- 
gant in all appointments at moderate 
prices. 

Reed & Roblee, Props. 
EUROPEAN PLAN. 



flOTEL 
BflRTHOLDI 

New York 



Hotel Bella Vista 



1001 Pine street 



ft First-class Hotel. 



The Bella Vista is the Pioneer 
Fiist-class Family Hotel of 
San Francisco. All the com- 
forts of a modern residence. 

MRS. A P. TRACV 



N. E. corner Van Ness and Myrtle avenues. THF HOTFI 

The principal and finest family hotel in San Francisco. 1 1 1L uuill 

HOTEL RICHELIEU CO. RICHELIEU 



' PACIFIC 
CONGRESS 
SPRINGS 
HOTEL 



Santa Gruz Mountains, 

Santa Clara County. 



Remodeled and under 
New Management .... 

Onlu two-and-a-half hours 
from San f rancisco. 

Six miles from Los Gatos. Ten 
miles from Santa Clara. Twelve 
miles from San Jose. 
For rates and printed matter address 

JOHN S, MATHESON, 

Manager, 



^^j^^^s^^^^^^^p^^^p^^k 



V'igHu Springs. 



Three Miles from 
UKIAH. 



Terminus of S. F. &. N. P, Railway 

Mendocino County 

The only place in the United States where Vichy Water is abundant. Only 
natural electric waters. Champagne baths. The only place in the world 
of this class of waters where the bathtubs are supplied by a continuous 
flow of natural warm water direct from the springs. Accommodations 
first class. _ „„ „ 

Miss D. D. Alien. Prop. 



BlytMale- 



NOW OPEN. Hotel and Cottages 



A pretty California spot on line of Mt Tamalpais Scenic Railway. 
Carriage meets all trains at Mill Valley. Five minutes' drive. 



Mrs. Gregg. 



Under New 
Management 



«^BL>UE> LAKES HOTEL, 



(Bertha Postofflce) 
LAKE COUNTY, CAL. 



Only 19 miles from Uklah. 

Finest summer resort in California. 

Good hunting, fishing, boating, and Bathing. 

Finest cuisine and best accommodations. 



R. E. WHITEFIELD, 



Manager. 



IO 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 17, 1897. 



MARGARET'S STORY. 



SHK sat upon a lovely hill watching the sea. In un- 
broken monotony it stretched before her. A dull 
grey mist hunt/ over it, and the clouds above her were 
dark and heavy. On the rocks beneath was the slow 
thunder of the waves, but the sea had its old fascination 
for her, as she listened to the theme of the water— p;ran 
of triumph, funeral dirge in one. The girl seemed strangely 
in keeping with the landscape and Nature's mood. Her 
hair damp with the sea mist, seemed to have lost its 
color, and clung in shadowy tendrils about her strong 
sensitive face; her quiet hands clasped her knees as she 
leaned slightly forward, and the fold of her black gown hid 
the grass at her feet. 

Margaret Percival had given herself up to the luxury 
of a mood which none of her acquaintances would have 
thought possible to he r. She was not a girl who often in- 
dulged in self pity, but to-day the tide had proved too 
strong for her. and with a rush came bitter memories and 
hopeless forebodings. She saw again the hale old father, 
whom she had so dearly loved, standing on the terrace to 
welcome her return from college and his loving greeting 
rang again in her ears. How proud and fond of her he 
had been! He was wont teasingly to declare that women 
of his day knew little, and cared less, for all the ologies 
and .Margaret must be on her metal if she would rival her 
ancestors in this respect; and then he would pat her head 
lovingly, and add. with a little sigh, that she was growing 
the image of her dead mother. How happy those days 
had been! The girl's eyes filled up suddenly at the recol- 
lection. 

All seemed to go well, from the housekeeping to the im- 
provements she had instituted around the place. She had 
worked hard, and played hard, and her enthusiasm was 
untempered by difficulties. 

Then came the time of which she could not even yet 
barely bring herself to think with calmness. Love 
walked beside her, and took her heart a willing captive; 
Love breathed in the summer sunshine; Love spoke 
through the summer Mowers; Love shone upon the moonlit 
It was the old story; halcyon days, followed, alas! 
by doubt, misunderstanding, pride and separation. Whose 
had been the fault? She saw him standing there, stern 
and handsome, while she faced him with womanly pride un- 
flinching. She heard the hot angry words, she watched 
his face change, and she felt the awful silence when he 
had left her. he had not proved so unforgiving. The old 
father saw it all, but was powerless to interfere, only his 
heart ached for the proud girl with whom he dared not re- 
monstrate or sympathize. Margaret knew that he had 
known, and now she bitterly repented that her pride had 
forbidden her to speak to him on the one subject which 
had ever been debarred them. It had all arisen out of so 
little, she thought, with a weary sigh. 

" Ob, the little more, and how much it is, 
And the little less, and what worlds away I" 

Slowly her thoughts traveled to the year which followed. 
She saw herself grow suddenly older; she plunged into 
work to bring the forgetfulness which would not come, 
striving hard to kill that which might be quieted but not 
destroyed. Then came the looking forward to her brother 
Dick's return from Cuba, followed quickly by the awful 
tragedy of his death from cholera — a blow which cut father 
and daughter to the heart, and from which the old man 
never rallied. Day by day she had seen him fail, and had 
striven with simulated cheerfulness, but with tightened 
heart-strings, to keep him with her, and now — Margaret 
glanced at her black gown and shivered. It was all too' 
horribly true. The noble grey head lay at rest beside the 
wife of his youth, the brilliant young soldier slept under a 
Cuban sun. and the home— every stone of which she knew 
ved — had passed to a mere acquaintance. 

So Margaret sat on. trying to realize that the future 
must be faced alone. No work, no friendship could ever 
compensate for her terrible loss the love which she had 
cast from her, and that which God had taken away. 

Suddenly there came a quick step through the grass. 
Margaret rose and turnedquickly then her heart seemed 
to stand still. 



He waited for no permission — perhaps her face told him 
there was no need — but enfolding her in his strong, tender 
arms, he cried passionately — 

"At last, my darling, at last!" and there seemed no 
further need of explanation or forgiveness. "Did you 
think I could stay away when I heard of your great 
sorrow?" He asked, presently, when the time came for 
words. "I have been traveling day and night to reach 
you, and, now, sweetheart, we shall not part again." 
"Have you forgiven my willfulness, Humphrey?" 

"Have you forgiven my hard heart, Margaret?" 

She raised her dark eyes shyly to his, and what she saw- 
there, fully satisfied her. Then upon them both fell the 
quiet of a great content. 

Presently she looked up and cried, joyfully. 

"See! the sun is shining! It is a happy omen, and," she 
added, softly, "it is an omen of our love." 

The mist had lifted, and the sun shone down upon them 
— full upon her hair, till it gleamed again like copper, and 
full upon the black gown, till even its sombreness was 
lightened. Then away over the sea and land the light 
spread, and the grass glowed like velvet, and the fields 
were as molten gold. — The Chaperone. 

An elegant table d'hote dinner is served regularly every after- 
noon between the hours of ."> and .s o'clock at Swain's Bakery, L'13 
Sutter street, for one dollar. The menu is superior, the restaurant 
quiet and refined, the service absolutely first class. It is Tery 
generally patronized by ladies and gentlemen ot the city who nu>' 
be down town at the hours named. The finest confections and pas- 
tries furnished promptly. 



All sensible people drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 

SkGOND-HflND 
BICYCLES 

We want to be rid at once of 
all the second-hand wheels 
We have. All are in good con- 
dition; some are as good as 
new. • • % 38 38 38 31 3f ■ 
There is one sure way to get 
them out--the prices. We 
have made the most tempting 
prices we ever knew on wheels 
I of equal value. » » » 38 » 



P0D6 MIq. Go., Hartford, Gonn. 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH: 

344 Post Street. 

GOLDEN GATE PARK BRANCH: 

Renting, Teaching. Storage, Lockers, Baths, 5 

1970 PAGE. NEAR STANYAN ST. 



GiirisMan Endeavor Rates 



Open I., all via 



Chicago and Northwestern 
ffiailwai/ 



To Chicago - - $25.00 
To St. Paul and Minneapolis, 26.75 
To Milwaukee - - 26.00 



San Francisco 
to Chicago, 
31-4 days. 



Thiough Daily Pullman and Tourist sleeping Cars 
R. RITCHIE, G A. P. C. No. Q New Montgomery St.. Palace Hotel 



July 17, 1897. 



SAX PRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




HOME DECORATION. 
t ! m wi'rtwt i iii 'ii' >' W f i nmw « vi ' » ' » 1 

THE provisions for the comfort of the guest in our 
modern houses have become enlarged from the narrow 
limits of mere lodging facilities formerly offered. In this 
we have followed the English style, very much to the ad- 
vantage of our visitors. A guest is a dependent kind of 
creature, and should be afforded every means of amusing 
and making himself comfortable without interfering 
with the regular arrangements of the family. Every 
guestroom should possess an easy-chair, a comfortable 
sofa and a writing table furnished with pens, paper, blotter 
and an inkstand, which is replenished as regularly as the 
matchsafe. It is customary to have the paper engraved 
with the name of the place, if in a country house, or with 
the street and number in the city. There should always 
be a candle in a broad-saucered candlestick with matches 
on a table near the bed. Some thoughtful hostesses pro- 
vide a luminous matchsafe. A small workbasket, with 
scissors, thimble, black silk thread, and shoe needles, 
thread and buttons, should stand on the dressing-table for 
the benefit of a transient visitor whose own supplies have 
been left at home. There should also be a brush and comb, 
a whisk broom and a powder-box well filled for the use of 
guests who may desire to refreshen their toilets 
a little. There should be a pin cushion — not too good to 
use — liberally supplied with both black and white pins. It 
seems almost unnecessary to mention fresh soap and a 
supply of towels. It may, however, be well to remind all 
hostesses that to a guest there is no form of hospitality 
more welcome than an extravagant allowance of towels 
and washcloths. Most modern guest-rooms have a bath- 
room attached. Where this is not possible, there should 
be a portable bathtub, which can stand in the closet in 
the day time; and a can of hot water should be brought to 
the guest on arising. It is misery to wait one's turn for 
the use of the family bathroom of a morning. To the 
guest also should be given an absolutely empty closet and 
dressing table. When to these creature comforts is added 
the charm of beauty and harmony in furnishing, there is a 
guest-room which it is a privilege to be asked to inhabit 
even for a day. In some houses the mental requirements 
of the visitors are considered, and bookcases filled with 
light literature are to be found in every room. A pretty 
fancy is to carve on the doors of a guest-room a name or a 
motto, in memory of the chamber whose "name was 
Peace." It is well, however, to choose the names with 
some care. 

It is a comparatively easy task to restore the mirror- 
like surface of old furniture and that of its metal trimmings 
if one has the proper materials. These are a bottle of the 
polish used in piano manufacturies for the wood, a brigh- 
tener for the brass, some scouring material for the steel 
and a half-dozen pieces of cloth. Soft old silk or cashmere 
are best, but cheese cloth will do. 

The piano polish may be prepared by any one. The 
formula given here was obtained from a dealer in old vio- 
lins and is the same as that used in piano warehouses, and 
will not injure the wood, but will rather preserve and 
beautify it. In a clean bottle put eight teaspoonfuls of 
sweet oil, the same quantity of spirits of turpentine, two 
teaspoonfuls of lemon juice, twenty drops of household 
ammonia and a few drops of the oil of cloves to overcome 
the smell of the turpentine. Shake the mixture actively 
until the oil is cut, and always shake well before using. 

Have the furniture to be polished free of dust. Apply 
with a bit of cloth; then with cloth No. 2 wipe away the 
extra polish, and with cloth No. 3 rub the surface briskly, 
when it will shine like a mirror. 

When the wood is clean the brass handles, railing or 
other finishings will clamor for a going over. A teaspoon- 
ful of salt dissolved in two teaspoonfuls of vinegar, applied 
with a cloth to the brasses, will remove verdigris and 
stains; a little whiting or silver polish briskly rubbed on 
will restore to brightness. If the trimmings are those 
known as gilt brasses do not use the salt and vinegar, but 
use carefully silver polish only. Nickel trimmings may be 
brightened with silver polish. 



"A perfect type of the highest order J 
of excellence in manufacture." i 

iWaiirtKGrWi 

Breakfast ' 

Cocoa i 



Absolutely Pure. 
j Delicious. 
i Nutritious. 

COSTS LESS THAN ONE CENT A CU P . 

Be sure that you get the 
genuine article, made at 

DORCHESTER, MASS., 
By WALTER BAKER & CO., Ltd. « 

Established 1730. 



MT. VERNON CO., Baltimore. 



The uudersiened. having been appointed Agents for the 
Pacific Coast for the sale of the manufactures of above 
company, have now in store r 

SAIL DUCK— ALL NUMBERS. 
HYDRAULIC— ALL NUMBERS. 
DRAPER AND WAGON DUCK. 

From 30 to 120 inches wide; and a complete assortment 
of all qualities 28&-inch duck, from 7 to 15 ozs., inclusive 
MURPHY, GRANT & CO. 

A Wonderful Medicine 

For Bilious and Nervous disorders, such as Wind and Pain in the Stom-' 
ach. Sick Headache, Giddiness, Fullness and Swelling after meals, Dizzi- 
ness and Drowsiness, Cold Chills, Flushings of Heat, Loss of Appetite, 
Shortness of Breath, Costiveness, Blotches on the Skin- Disturbed Sleep,' 
Frightful Dreams, and all Nervous and Trembling Sensations, etc., when 
these symptoms are caused by constipation, as most of them are. THE 
FIRST DOSE WILL GIVE RELIEF IN TWENTY MINUTES- 
This is no fiotion. Every sufferer is earnestly invited to try one Box of 
these Pills and they will be acknowledged to be 

A WONDERFUL MEDICINE- 

BEECHAM'S PILLS, taken as directed, will quickly restore Females to 
complete health. They promptly remove obstructions or irregularities of 
the system. For a 

Weak Stomach 

Impaired Digestion 

Disordered Liver 

they act like magic— a few doses will work wonders upon the Vital Organs; 
strengthening the muscular system, restoring the long-lost complexion, 
bringing back the keen edge of appetite, and arousing with the Rosebud 
of Health the whole physical energy of the human frame. These are 
facts admitted by thousands, in all classes of society, and one of the best 
guarantees to the Nervous and Debilitatedis that BeecharrTs Pills have 
the Largest Sale of any Patent Medicine in the World. 

WITHOUT A RIVAL. 

Annual Sales more than 6,000,000 Boxes. 



85c. at Drugstores, or will be sent by U. S. Agents, B. 
355 Canal St., New York, post paid, upon receipt of price, 
paplication. 



F. ALLEN CO. 
Book free upon 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 17, 1897. 



^MC/ML J&l/tEWf 



Few people have beard of the source of 
The Great the Bradbury fortunes, at least among 
Bradbury Mine, those who possibly were not aware that 
such a family existed until the late un- 
pleasantness brought it into prominence. For all that, 
the wealth which has been poured into their coffers is. 
perhaps, greater than that which enabled Bancroft to pro- 
duce a race of " Uncrowned Kings" on the Pacific Coast 
at so much a head. Young Mr. Bradbury's father got an 
interest in this property some twenty-five years ago. It 
is located near the town of Rosario, distant about sixty 
miles from Mazatlan. Mr. Bradbury married a daughter 
of the largest Mexican owner of the mine, and went broke 
on his investment, losing some $l!0,000, all the money he 
had. and all lie could borrow. He was about to give up 
the search for ore in disgust and return to California, 
when a cave took place in the mine, exposing its immense 
wealth of mineral, enough gold being taken out in a few 
days to clear off his debts and leave a handsome surplus. 
From that time Bradbury lived on Easy street, and his 
family after him. They tell some wonderful stories about 
his mine, which was worked by the ancients, its known 
history running back for over 250 years. The present 
workings of the mine are many hundreds of feet below sea 
level. The latest discovery before Bradbury got it is at- 
tributed to the loss of a rosary by a Mexican herder who 
was belated one night. He had lit a fire where he camped, 
and the heat had brought gold out. From the tailings and 
dump pile, with its accumulation of centuries, the present 
owners are assured a good income for many years to come. 

The latest report of Mr. J. W. Warbur- 
A Safeguard ton, the British Consul General in this 
For Investors, city, has appeared, dealing with affairs 
within his jurisdiction in a trenchant, 
plain-spoken style which is refreshing after the wishy- 
washy diatribes usually dished up by officials in an effort 
to serve two masters. Of course some complaints will 
naturally be aired of strictures necessarily severe. The 
truth is not palatable at all times, especially when it is 
apt to affect the pocket of individuals who regard money- 
getting as the sole object of a lifetime. Nevertheless it 
will be difficult to controvert Mr. Consul Warburton's 
statements on any point, although possibly it would be 
equally as difficult to convince the man whose "ox is 
gored ' that he is right on some special point. But with 
such documents before him, the investor has only himself 
to blame if he wanders into financial trouble. In speak- 
ing of the word "limited," for instance, in connection with 
The California Beet Sugar Estate and Land Companv. 
Limited, the Consul says: "The word 'limited' at the end 
of the name of a company has no significance here (Cali- 
fornia). A shareholder in a joint stock company is liable 
for the debts of the company in proportion that the shares 
he owns bears to the whole of the subscribed stock of the 
company. A member of the California Beet Sugar Estate 
and Land Company. Limited, tells me that the company 
has taken an English name to facilitate the sale of bonds 
on the London market.'' This is a nice admission for any 
one to make. 

Congress will be asked to place cyanide 
Protection for of potassium on the free list bv the inter- 
Manganese, national Gold Mining Convention. This 

would be only right. The next thing that 
should be done is to protect manganese by placing such a 
tariff on it as to prevent the importation of foreign ores. 
Some of the finest manganese mines in the world are lying 
idle in California today, because the American steel men! 
who use it in large quantities, find it cheaper to buv 
abroad. Colorado, owing to the fine qualitv of its ores, 
has managed to get some share of the trade, but Cali- 
fornia, with even higher grade deposits, has been barred 
by the extra hauling expense. A heavy duty on the for- 
eign material would create a demand for the home product 
and give employment to many additional miners through 
the opening up of American mines. 



It looks as if the water gas process had at last 
The New worked its way west of the Rockies. The 
Gas Light. East has not taken the fever to any serious 

extent on its passage from the old world, 
where the test of years has not proven satisfactory to 
the extent of making the gas popular. In fact, the craze 
has nearly died out in England, where the alleged facili- 
ties and economies of the new illuminant afforded the pro- 
moter a wide field for a time for stock jobbing. One of 
the biggest concerns engaged in the business in Great 
Britain, known as the British Water-Gas Syndicate, has 
only recently been wound up, and others, the North Brit- 
ish and Yorkshire and Lancashire Companies, have not 
set the Thames on fire. It will be just as well to go slow in 
the matter here before too much money is expended. The 
theory is all right. So is the acetylene, but somehow or 
other neither work out when it comes down to developing 
their practical utility. The latter is positively dangerous, 
while the most harmless looking compound to the un- 
sophisticated, who never have the hidden dangers brought 
home to them umil the explosion takes place. 

People who took stock in the old re-con- 
Anxous About struction scheme of the Mammoth gold 
the Mammoih, mines of Arizona are now wondering why 
the work ended with the issue of the new 
stock, known as the Mammoth Collins Gold Mines Limited. 
On the other hand, any one acquainted with the history 
of the property is apt to wonder why the re-construction 
should have taken place at all. The cheapest way would 
have been to shut down at once and end the loss right 
there. Another strange thing is how soon the "going 
concern" of the Western American slope peters out after 
passing into the hands of the British investor. Some of 
these promotions, viewed to-day in the light of past his- 
tory, make interesting reading for the skeptic who sneers 
at the infallibility of the up-to-date mining experts. How 
many of these reports have proven correct in the past ? 
Just run over the record of transactions within the range 
of memory, and figure up. The result will prove a sur- 
prise. 

The London Financial News, in speaking 
of the attention which is now being paid 
to gold mining in Ireland, says that all 
authorities agree in stating that the an- 
cient inhabitants of that country must have been very 
familiar with gold, and well-accustrmcd to its use. Native 
gold occurs in geological deposits in many parts of Ireland. 
Until lately the gold mines of Wicklow were the most pro- 
ductive of the British Isles, but besides this there are six 
other known gold-producing localities — Antrim, Derry, 
Tyrone, Kildare, Dublin, and Wexford. It is a fact that 
no country in Europe possesses so much manufactured 
gold belonging to early ages as Ireland. 

Inactivity has been the sole feature of 

The P ne Street the mining market on Pine street dur- 

Market. ing the week. The brokers have not 

earned their salt, and speculators pin 

their faith on Sierra Nevada and Chollar Brunswick, while 

awaiting fortune. There are lots of tipsters abroad, and 

words of cheer are common on all the street corners. A 

little inside money thrown into the market now and then, 

by way of variety, would do more to spice things up. 

"Pegamoid," the mystery fostered by some 

A British British promoters for foreign trade, is said to 

Mystery, be a preparation consisting chiefly of para- 

ffine. and used to treat clothes, paper and 

other substances to make them waterproof. This tip may 

enable prospective buyers to invest reasonably, that is if 

they have sense enough to get in out of the wet. 

The "Comstock" mines is the high-sounding 
They Aim appellation bestowed on some mines re- 
Very High, cently acquired in British Columbia. The 
chances are that the name will last longer 
than the mines. The first thing we know, it will be n 
slut to copyright the names of mines, if it is desirable to 
perpetuate them. 

THE total amount of silver dollars coined on Mavl. 1897, 
was $449,118,641. Of these 1395.342, 193 were deposited 
in the vaults of the Treasury, and $53,9V6,44S were either 
in the banks or in the handsof the people. 



Gold Fields 
Ireland. 



July 17, 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



13 




1 Hear thoCr lor: " "Whit the devil art IbouT" 
'One that will olav the devil, sir. with you." 



M RS. PERKINS is exceedingly indignant at the way 
± l San Francisco has again disgraced itself. She says 
it was bad enough to have the daily papers devoting their 
pages to the recent society scandal, though that was only 
to be expected of them, but what angered her most of all 
was the sight that met her eyes when she went down town 
the day the guilty couple arrived. The whole city was in 
gala attire she says, flags and bunting were flying and a 
large arch bearing the word "Welcome" was stuck up to 
greet them. Such going's op, quoth Mrs. P., are an 
outrage to all respectable females and a menace to the 
city's reputation. 

THE Chinese are a humorous people, judging by their 
noses, and must enjoy many a chuckle at the expense 
of the white man. Our women who cheerfully endure tor- 
tures in attempting to reduce their waist measurements 
to-sweet seventeen, express the utmost horror of the cruel 
footsqueezing practices of the celestial, and John Lee who 
tried to sell his daughter to a suitor was condemned in 
Judge Cook's court last week, for observing a custom com- 
mon to both countries, — only in one it is done honestly and 
in the other sub rosa. 

THERE has been much consternation in all classes of 
the community, and especially among those holding 
official positions, as the frauds of the office of Internal 
Revenue came to light by the aid of suicide and arrest, 
and the need of a strong reforming hand is seriously felt. 
It is a great relief to know that, now Mayor Phelanhas 
returned to town, Dr. Rottanzi hopes to have time to take 
the working of the office in hand, as the zeal with which he 
takes up anything either within or without his proper 
province is well known. 

A DEPLORABLE condition of the police stations in this 
city is reported by the Grand Jurors subsequent to 
official investigation. Perhaps the rottenness of the con- 
demned buildings may have permeated the management 
and caused a corresponding decay of principles and effi- 
ciency. If so, by all means let us have new structures at 
once. 

SHALL visiting consumptives be quarantined ? The 
subject is agitating the State Board of Trade, and an 
embargo upon victims of phthisis is threatened. While 
discussing the ominous influx of bodily diseased persons, 
cannot something be done to check the emigration hither 
of those who are morally diseased ? 

THE contract wife of window-jumper Alatigny, the man 
who is supposed to have been light in his upper story 
when he leaped from an upper story, is in evidence at his 
sanitarium bedside. This is an unusual state of things. 
Contract spouses generally appear as post-mortem, rather 
than ante-mortem evidence. 

THERE seems to be some difficulty in pitching on a site 
for the proposed new zoo, but there will be none in fill- 
ing it when we get it. We have some unique anthropological 
specimens in the city who are at present roaming at large, 
but they will be more in place when they get behind the 
bars. 

WE have often heard of people carrying their fortunes 
on their backs but no one would have thought of ac- 
cusing the Christian Endeavorers of such a thing, if it had 
not come out that Brother Taylor of Illinois sent his shirt 
to the wash lined with greenbacks. 

lUf ANY people protested against the action of the So- 
i'l ciety for the Suppression of Vice in prosecuting 
Ward and letting Mrs. Bradbury go free, until they heard 
that she had gone to Chicago, when it was felt that her 
punishment was severe enough. 

IT would be interesting to know how much the circulation 
of the daily papers was increased during the Christian 
Endeavor Convention to which they catered so prodigiously. 



T^KNTAIj Damnablcs" was tre title of a paper read 
LS by Dr, Warren de Crow, a Garden City tooth- 
puller, at the Dental Congress this week in San Francisco, 
in which he made caustic reference to the "parlor" 
quacks of his profession. Thereupon Dr. George H. 
Chance, a Portland yanker of molars, cuspids and bi- 
cuspids, pointed the digit of scorn at an illustrious speci- 
men of the quack brotherhood, and a general row ensued. 
It is to be hoped that the delegates extracted enjoyment 
from the painful incident. 

THE contractors on the hall of justice on Kearny 
street are still asleep. They are awakened now and 
then by the usual inquiry of 1he Supervisors, there is a 
momentary activity and then the repose of the dead. The 
power to electrify these loiterers into permanent life lies 
somewhere on our statutes, and it ought to be dug up and 
applied to the bare backs of them vigorously and per- 
sistently. Verily between the contractors, the sub-con- 
tractors and the Supervisors the taxpayers are ground as 
between the upper and nether millstone. 

HER Ex-Royal Fatness, Liliuokalani, now shines greasily 
in a new role. From hounding Senators and other 
powers that be at the Nation's capital, the unctious 
Hawaiian has taken to music and literature, composing 
melodies and writing her biography by turns. Lil is dark 
enough, goodness knows, without slinging ink. When she 
smites the air with her tom-tom the Washingtonians 
should lose no time in having her arrested for disturbing 
the peace. 

A/I RS. Hattie Reed, who conducts a refuge home for 
_i T l young children in the Mission, has been arrested this 
week for wanton cruelty to the helpless little ones in her 
charge. The case against her should be vigorously prose- 
cuted. The Reed woman represents a class of vultures 
all too numerous here and elsewhere, who secure their 
prey only to abuse it. Cruelty develops the criminal in- 
stinct in children, and such offenders need the branding 
iron. 

THERE is rumor afloat that another American heiress 
is to wed an English Duke, so Uncle Sam will once 
more have the satisfaction of seeing his own good dollars 
devoted to the charitable purpose of restoring decayed 
ducal palaces. The Town Crier suggests that all Ameri- 
can girls possessing over one million dollars be created 
duchesses in their own right, as this is the only likely way 
to keep them and their money at home. 

THE Texas fever is to be stamped out in California, if 
prompt and vigorous action will accomplish that re- 
sult. The line of separation between the fever cattle and 
districts that are free, reminds one of the political shoe- 
string districts familiar to the country east of the Rocky 
Mountains; a moral gerrymander, however, would make 
the zig-zag of the Texas fever look like a straight edge by 
comparison. 

A MAN may often speak slightingly of himself and his 
relatives who would yet immediately resent any one 
else's doing so. In the same manner we allow our own 
people the privilege of breaking the laws of the State, but 
when a stranger has the presumption to do so it is quite 
another matter, as Wristhesley RusseU Ward has dis- 
covered. 

FITTED against each other for competitive honors are 
the Chicago and the San Francisco Fly Casting Clubs. 
This is folly, and success for us impossible. We may be 
fly, but there are others as fly as we, and the Windy City 
was ever the highest flyer of them all. We should cast 
about us for less hopeless laurels in the contest line. 

THE Bryan wave of eloquence 
Has come and gone. In rolling hence 
What has it left, this flood of speech, 
For hungry Democrats to reach ? 
Not bread, but pebbles on the beach ? 

BROAD is the highway that leads to destruction, we 
are told. Not always. How about the narrow side 
entrance and the French dinners thereof? 

OHDO, the Japanese, is studying Kant, we are told, hut 
it is not the cant which the Examiner editors studied 
during the Convention week. 



M 



SAX FRA.NCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 17, 1897. 










D 



A WOMAN'S QU ESTIO N.-offMW>tir journal, 

you know you have asked for the costliest thing 
Ever made by the Hand above— 

A woman's heart and a woman's lite, 

And a woman's wonderful love? 
Do you know you have asked for this pricele^ thing 

As a child might have asked for a toy, 
Demanding what others have died to win 

With the reckless dash of a boy? 
You have written my lessons of duty out; 

Manlike you have questioned me; 
Now stand at the bar of my woman's soul, 

1'ntil I have questioned theel 
You require your bread should be always good, 

Your socks and your shirts should be whole; 

1 require your heart to be true as God's stars 
And pure as heaven your soul ! 

You require a cook for your mutton and beef— 

I require a far better thing; 
A seamstress you'r wanting for stocking and shirt— 

I want a man and a king! 
a king for the beautiful realm called home, 

And a man that the Maker, God, 
^hall look upon as He did the 1 1 1 

And say, it is very good ! 
1 am fair and young, but the rose will fade 

From my soft young cheek one day : 
Will you love me then, 'mid the falling leaves, 

As you did mid the bloom of May'/ 
I.? your heart an ocean so strong and deep 

1 may launch my all on its tide? 
A loving woman finds heaven or bell 

1 »n the day she is made a bride! 
1 require all things that are good and brae, 

All things that a man should be; 
If you give this all I would stake my life 

To lie all you demand of me. 
If you cannot do this, a laundress, a cook. 

You can hire, with little to pay, 
Bot a woman's heart and a woman's life 

Are not to be won that way. 



ONCE IN A W HILE— Montreal herald 

< tllCfl in a while the sun shines out 

Aud the arching skies are a perfect blue ; 
Once in a while 'mid clouds of doubt 

Faith's fairest stars come peeping through; 
* >ur paths lead down by the meadows fair, 

Where the sweetest blossoms nod and smile. 
And we lay aside our cross of care, 

' luce in a while. 
Once in a while within our own 

We feel the hand of a steadfast friend ; 
Once in a while we hear a tone 

■ ■. e with the heart's own voice to blend ; 
And the dearest of all our dreams come true, 

And on life's way is a golden smile ; 
Kach thirsting Mower is kissed with dew, 

Once in a while. 
Once in a while in the desert sand 

We find a spot of the fairest green ; 
Once in a while from where we stand 

The hills of Paradise are seen. 
And a perfect joy iu our hearts we hold, 
A joy that the world cannot defile; 

Ifl earth's dross for the purest gold, 
■in a while. 



REMEMBERED— tun a playtch scabury. 

1 thought you had forgotten— then life seemed 

A winter waste, a streuu of fold gray skies — 
And then you wrote, i'a li^ht in my eyes 

Through the glad tears in arching rainbows gleamed 
Across the April buds of 

And happy nestling birds -ang far and near 
That love was always true— as skies were clear. 

Spring broke again, when you remembered me. 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

RESTAURANTS. 
Bergez's Restaurant, Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street, below Mont- 
gomery. Rooms for ladies and families; private entrance. John Bergez 
Proprietor. 
Maison Tortoni, French Rotlsserie, 111 O'Farrell street. Private dining 

rooms and banquet hall. S. Constantlnl, Proprietor. 
Poodle Dog Restaurant, S. E. cor. Grant are. and Bush st. Private 

dining and banquet rooms. Tel. 429. A. B. Blanco Sz B. Bbun. 

DENTISTS. 
Dr. Franklin Pancoast removed to 20 O'Farrell street, rooms 16, 17 & 26 

MEDICAL. 
Dr. Hall, 14 McAllister St.. near Jones. Diseases of women and children. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
Selections on approval: any place in world. W. F. GREANY, 827Brannan 
The W. H. Holiis Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105 O'Farrell St., S. F. 

BOILER MAKERS. 
P. F. Dundon's San Francisco Iron Works, 314, 316, and 318 Main street. 
Iron Work of every description designed and constructed . 

CANDIES. 
Ma. Hard's Chocolates in % and Mb boxes. Roberts', Polk and Bush. 

LADIES' HAIR DRESSING. 
Hermann Schwarze (known as Hermann at Strozynski's) has opened 
Ladies' Hair Dressing Parlors at 211 Powell st. Telephone Main 6820 



BANKING. 



Bank o? British Columbia. 

Southeast Cor. Bush and Sanbome Sts. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

Capital Paid Up 13,000,01:0 

Reserve Fund | 500,UO0 

HEAD OFFICE 60 Lombard Street, London 

Branches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster. Kamloops, Nan- 
lamo, Nelson, Sandon. and Kaslo, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon Us Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Caic ago— First National Bank; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company: I h eland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company ot 
Sydney, Ld ; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

The flnglo-Galifornian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized KS.OOO.OOO 

Subscribed 3,000,000 

Paid Up 1,600,000 

Reserve Fund 700,000 

N. £. Cor. Pine and Sansoue Sts 
Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co.. 31 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bills rnr collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINBART 1 „..„,.„. 

P. N. LILIENTBAL f "»°»K«r8 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

No. 526 California Street. San Francisco 

Guarantee capital and surplus $3 040.201 66 

Capital actually paid up In cash 1,000 000 00 

Deposits December 31, 18M 87.7c0.9fl 4b 

OFFICERS: Pres'dcnt, B A. Becker; First Vice-President. Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-Presideni, H. Horsimaa: Cashier, A. H. R Schmidt; 
tnl < lashier, William Herrmann: Secretary. George Tourny; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. Muller; Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: H A. Becker. Daniel Mever. H Horst- 
raanu, Ign. Sicinhart, N. Van Bergen, E. Roote, H B. Russ, D. N. 
Walter and N. Ohlandt 

Wells Fargo & Go.'s Bank. 

.V. E. Cobbed Sansoue & Sutter Streets 

John J. Valentine President 

Homer S. King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier 

F. L. Llpman Assistant Cashier 

Cash Capital and Surplus M. 250,000 

BRANCHES. 
NY. City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldridge, Henry 

E. Huntington. Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles 

F. Crocker, Dudley Evann. 

Security Savings Bank. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building, 
interest paid on deposits. 

LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 
William Alvord S L.Abbott. Jr H.H.Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O. D Baldwin E J. McCutchen 

Adam Grant W.S.Jones J.B.Lincoln 



July 17, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO 




Here is a drought story told by a traveling man: 1 was 
driving across the country to a little town in western 
Kansas the other day. when I met a farmer hauling a 
wagon load of water. "Where do you get water?" said I. 
' l*p the road about seven miles," he replied. "And you 
haul water seven miles for your family and stock?" "Yep." 
'Why in the name of sense don't you dig a well'.'" "Be- 
cause it's jest as far one way as the other, stranger.' — 
Kansas City Journal. 

The summer sun glared fiercely down 

I'pon the seashore gay, 
And watched the maidens as they pranced 
In Neptune's briny spray. 
■' Humph!" said the orb, as up he rose 

And took another turn, 
" 'Tis true that men are lacking here, 
But there are girls to burn!" 

—Virginia Niles Leeds, in Life. 

It was the first time Stuart had seen any very small 
chickens, and he did not understand that the smooth 
patches on the sides were wings. When one of the chicks 
tried to spread his wings Stuart cried. "See! he's open- 
ing his pockets, and there isn't anything in them." — Puck. 

A Washington clergyman tells a story of a class of Sun- 
day school boys who were reciting clauses of the Apostles' 
creed in turn. When the last clause was reached one of 
the boys explained: "The boy .that believes in the Holy 
Ghost is not here to-day." — N. Y. Tribune. 

Officer — Yis, th' Dutch an' th' Oirish do be great paaple. 
Shure, 'tis all th' law bizness av th' counthry thot's in 
their hands. Dinklespiel — How vos dot? Officer — 
Whoy, 'tis th' Dutch thot make th' beer, an' th' Oirish 
thot make th' arrists, do yez moind? — Judge. 

Mr. Jonnsin — Dar goes de coon dat hits de races ebery 
time. Dat man am coinin' money. Mr. Smiff — How's 
dat? Mr. Johxsi.v — W'en dat coon fust began toe play de 
races he'd lose de fust day an' win de nex', an' now he 
plays ebery udder day. — Judge. 

First Summer Boarder — Pity there is n't a restaurant 
here. Second Summer Boarder — Why, this village is too 
small to support a restaurant! First Summer Boarder 
— Oh! I don't know. I think the boarders would patronize 
it between meals. — Puck. 

"It required an effort to swallow you," said the whale. 
"What of that?" retorted Jonah. "It will require a 
greater effort two thousand years from now to swallow 
the story." Jonah was a true prophet. — Judge. 

Miss Ruth Cutler, of New York, recently cleared a high- 
jump bar at 5 feet 4 inches. It is not stated whether the 
animal just behind her was a cow or a mouse. — Yonkers 
Statesman. 

"I am lired," said the bicycle, "even to death," 
To the w»itired bulk that bestrode her ; 
Then, pausing she gave up her pneumatic breath, 
And fell on the road where he rode her.— Unidentified. 

"What labor Lnion has the largest membership?" asked 
the seeker after information. "Marriage," answered the 
man who was up in statistics. — Truth. 

First Chorus Girl— I feel queer in short skirts, don't you? 
Second Chorus Girl— No, indeed I don't; I'm not built 
that way. — Adams Freeman. 

$25 Rate to Chicago via the Great Santa Fe Route. 
The low rates made for Christian Endeavorers will be open to the 
public as well, if they travel via the Great Santa Fe Koute. Ticket 
Office, 014 Market street, Chronicle Building. Tel. Main 1531. 



The Press Clipping bureau, 510 Montgomery street, S. F. reads all 
papers on the Paotflc Coast, and supplies dippings on all topics, business 
andpersonal. — 

When out nights drinking: use Bronio-Kola in the morning. 



Jackson's Napa Soda leaves a good taste in the mouth. 



NEWS LETTER. 15 

BANKING. 

California Safe Deposit, and Trust, Company. 

California and Hontgomen srs, 

Capitol Fully Paid »1 ,000,000 

Transacts a general banking business 
and all.*.-. on ii< posits payable on demand or liftrr notice 

■Vota as Bxeoutor, Administrator, and Trustee under wills or in any 
other trust capacity. Wills are drawn by the Company's attorneys and 
ar.- taken care of without charge. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES to rent at prices from $5 per annum up- 
n arti according to size, and valuables of all kinds are stored at low rates. 

Directors: J. d Fry. Henry witiiams. I. G. wtcke-rsham. Jacob u. 
Johnson, James Treadwell, P. W. Lou gee. Henry F. Fortmann, K B. Wal- 
lace. R. D. Fry. A, D. Sharon, and J. Dalzell Brown. 

Officers: J. D Fry, President: Henry Williams, Vice-President; R. 
D Fry. Second Vice-President; J. Dalzell Brown, Secretary and Treas- 
urer; E E.Shotwell, Assistant Secretary; Gunnison, Boo'.h & Bartnett, 
Attorneys. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, 
Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital |1 ,000,000 

Paid-TJp Capital I 300,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President. S. G. MURPHY, Vice-President. 

JOHN A, HOOPER, Vice-President. 
Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James Mofflt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, 
and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY. Cashier. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co , , or Exchange 
on City Banks, When opening accounts send signatme. 

San FrancisGo Savings Union. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits, Dec. 31, 1895 S2$,*J02,327 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 1,575,631 

ALBERT MILLER, President | E. B. POND, Vice-President 
Directors— Thomas Magee, G. W. Beaver, Philip Barth, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fremery, George C. Boardman, Robert Watt; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 
pass-book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9, A. m. to 3 p. M. Saturday even- 
ings, 6:30 to 8. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited. 

N.W. COR. SANSOME & SOTTER STS. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 

Paid Up Capital §2,000.000 

ReserveFund f 850,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cle, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM 1 Manaffers 
C. ALTSCHUL j- Managers. 

GroGker-Woolworth National Bank of S. F. 

Corner market, Montgomery, 

and Post Streets. 

Paid-Up Capital 11,000,000 

WM. H.CROCKER... President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W.KLINE Cashier 

Directors — Chas. F. Crooker, E. B. Pond, Hy. J.Crooker, Geo. W. Scott 

The Sather Banking Company. 

Successor to Sather & Co. 

Established 1851, San Francisco. 

Capital 11,000,000 

James K. Wilson President. Albert Miller, Vice-President 

L. I. Cowgill. Cashier. F. W. Wolfe, Secretary. 

Directors— C. S. Benedict, E G. Lukens, F. W. Sumner, Albert Mil 
ler Wm. P. Johnson, V. H. Metcalf, James K. Wilson. 

Agents: New York— J. P. Morgan & Co. Boston— National Bank of the 
Commonwealth. Philadelphia — Drexel & Co. Chicago— Continental Na- 
tional Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First Na- 
tional Bank. London— Brown, Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co 

Bank of California, San Francisco. 

Capital and Surplus, $6,000,000 

WILLIAM ALVORD ^President I CHARLES R. BISHOP. .Vice-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith Ass'tCasbier 1 1. F. Moulton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

New York — Messrs. Laldlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston— The Tremont Na- 
tional Bank; Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Union National 
Bank. Philadelphia— National Bank of the Republic. St. Louis— Boat- 
man's Bank. Virginia City (Nev.)— Agency or The Bank of California. 
London— Messrs. N. M.Rothschild & Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Roths- 
child Freres. Berlin— Direction der Diseonto Gesellschaft. China, 
Japan and East Indies— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China. 
Australia and New Zealand— The Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and 
Bank of New Zealand. 

Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 17, 1897. 




" My Confidences: An Autobiographical Sketch Addressed to my 
Descendants," by Frederick Locker-I.arnpson. Published by 
Smith. Elder & Co.. 15 Waterloo Place, London, 1898. Kew 
York. Charles Scribner's Sons. 
The author apologizes for the production of this book by 
saying that he is anxious that any descendant of his who 
may have a taste for family records and ancestral anec- 
dotes may find something to gratify him. The volume was 
written at various periods during the last fifteen years of 
Mr. Locker's life, which ended at Rowfant on May 30, 
1895. It has been edited by the well-known Member of 
Parliament, Mr. Augustine Birrell. 

Mr. Locker gives us many details of his ancestors and 
life in a verv frank manner: but the most interesting part 
of his book to the majority of readers (especially on this 
side of the Atlantic) is the biographical sketches of Thack- 
eray, George Eliot, Charles Dickens, Dean Stanley, An- 
thony Trollope, Mr. Abraham Hayward, and other celebri- 
ties. We are glad to find that Mr. Locker entertained a 
high opinion of the literary work of Mr. Trollope, and also of 
the nobility of his nature : he thinks that he may well have 
been the most generous notable man of letters since Wal- 
ter Scott. Of Carlyle Mr. Locker says : "He bad many 
faults, and they were not all pleasant ones; he was a man 
of many wants: he was extraordinarily tenacious and 
weakly unreasonable as to his personal comforts, and this 
became a terrible tyranny for those who lived with him. 
He abused his knack of caricature and power of saying 
bitter things, and was remarkable for the impartiality 
with which he exercised that power; he may have been 
scornful and perhaps envious; but remember he was a 
Scot, peasant-born, peasant-bred— and dyspept;c. It was 
unfortunate that his wife, by reason of hercauslic temper, 
was not qualified to influence the softer side of his char- 
acter." This seems to us a very luminous piece of criti- 
cism. Mr. Locker's social philosophy is so like our own 
that we cannot forbear to quote a few more words: "It is 
a mistake to cultivate friendships with people decidedly 
inferior to yourself in social status. I used not to realize 
this, and I have suffered. * * * This is my advice : * * * 
'Find your acquaintance among people more liberally edu- 
cated, more able, more socially powerful, and more high- 
minded than yourself, keep good company, and be 
ilu number." This is excellent advice, though not always 
easy to follow. Mr. Locker was not of a robust habit of 
body, and was not fond of out-door sports, yet he enter- 
tained a hearty regard for Major G. J. Whyte-Melville, 
the sporting writer and fox-hunter, and was glad to know 
Fred Archer the jockey, Hanlan the sculler, Tom Sayers 
the pugilist, W. G. Grace, the cricketer, and Mr. Brookes, 
the famous high jumper for the University of Oxford. The 
"Last Chapter" of this interesting volume is pitched in a 
rather low key: we read : "There are drawbacks to age. 
It brings its weariness with it. and it encourages the con- 
tempt of the less thoughtful: so I think that the best pos- 
sessions that an old man can hope for are the respect 
and affection of his family, and it behooves him to make 
himself as little disagreeable as possible." A perusal of 
Mr. Locker's reminiscences leaves us with the impression 
that he had a delicate, refined, sensitive, and highly culti- 
vated mind, endowed with strong social inclinations, and 
capable of taking interest in various pursuits and peo- 
ple, but that he would have enjoyed life more heartily 
and to a greater age had he been gifted with stronger 
health and higher spirits. But the record, notwithstand- 
ing a touch of melancholy in it, is a highly interesting one, 
and preserves recollections of many notable and eminent 
persons. The most amusing thing in the volume is "The 
story of a postage-stamp,'' in which Mr. Locker tells how 
he had written a letter to Lionel Tennyson, and had 
stamped it: but later, as he had to pass Lionel's lodgings 
in Pall Mall, decided to deliver it personally. In his haste 
he opened the door of the four-wheeler too soon; it struck 
a stone post and was torn off. The watch which he held 
in his hand fell onto the pavement, his hat was damaged 
and his temper ruined. It cost him about five pounds to 



repair the cab, and a pound more to have his watch put 
into order. The postage-stamp was spoiled in the attempt 
to get it off the envelope. The book is excellently printed 
and has a useful index. 

The average expenditure of a Princeton undergraduate 
who goes in for athletics, and enjoys himself in a reason- 
able way, is less than five hundred dollars per annum. 
How different the scale of expenditure is at Oxford and 
Cambridge may be judged from the fact that a thousand 
dollars per annum is considered a most moderate allow- 
ance, while the son of a rich man may have four or five 
times that amount, and will even then owe four or five 
thousand dollars when he leaves the University. Even the 
poor men at Oxford and Cambridge often receive consid- 
erable sums from their colleges as the rewards of scholar- 
ship. One able man at the University of Cambridge re- 
ceived during the whole of his undergraduate career not 
less than two thousand dollars per annum. The present 
writer, in one good year at Oxford, put together upwards 
of one thousand dollars in exhibitions and prizes. It has 
been estimated that one-fourth of the undergraduates at 
Oxford receive some emoluments from their college or old 
school. When even the poor men have such incomes as 
these, and an almost unlimited credit among the trades- 
men, it is not wonderful that the rate of expenditure 
among undergraduates is high. A fashionable man at 
Brasenose College, who is a member of the Bullingdon and 
Phoenix Clubs, and of the Apollo Lodge of Free Masons, 
has four evening-dress suits, and, if be is a fox-hunter as 
well, there must be added a pink and a black hunting-coat, 
besides clothes for street wear, for boating, cricketing, 
golf, and various other purposes. 

It is announced that the main body of Collier's Weekly 
will in future be made up of articles by Edgar Saltus, Ed- 
gar Fawcett. Julian Hawthorne, and John Habberton. In 
the Fiction Supplement short stories by well-known 
writers, and an installment of a longer tale, will be fur- 
nished. The long story at present running through the 
Weekly is "A Voyage of Consolation," by Mrs. Ever- 
ard Cotes, better known as Sara Jeannette Duncan, and 
author of "xVn American Girl in London." The issue for 
June 24th contains a glowing eulogy of Mrs. Cotes's work 
by Mr. Edgar Saltus, and some interesting remarks by 
Mr. Edgar Fawcett on two famous Rugbeians, Matthew 
Arnold and Arthur Hugh Clough, both of whom, he says, 
were men of prodigious abilities and attainments, but just 
missed greatness. Mr. Fawcett also takes occasion in his 
department to comment shrewdly upon the fact that the 
editors of the best-known magazines are so much concerned 
to get what in their jargon they term "timely contribu- 
tions,'' that they neglect to get literary articles. Inci- 
dentally he makes some remarks on verse-writing that 
may be strongly recommended to the would-be poets and 
dramatists who constitute so large a percentage of our 
population. There is also an almost vehement justifica- 
tion of "Ouida" against the charges of vulgarity, bizar- 
re n'«, and inaccuracy. It is a long time since we read one 
of ,- Ouida's" novels, but we intend to read her last, keep- 
ing Mr. Fawcett's remarks in mind. But that "Ouida" 
has force, imagination, and the power of telling a story 
we never doubted. 

The religious world has been exercising itself much of 
late as to whether the whale literally swallowed Jonah, or 
not. A paper called The Congregationalist says that Mr. 
Moody and Dr. Harper are at one in thinking that the 
great fish swallowed the prophet, while Dr. Lyman Abbott 
thinks that the book of Jonah is fiction written for the 
purpose of satire. "Which of these three eminent men 
shall we believe? " asks The Congregationalist, and goes 
on to say: "Perhaps if the evidence which they claim to 
possess concerning the literary character of the Book of 
Jonah were put before us we could judge for ourselves." 
Anybody who calls Mr. Moody an "eminent man" and re- 
gards his opinion upon any literary matter as of the 
slightest importance must be utterly incapable of judging 
of the value of evidence at all. Mr. Moody is merely a re- 
ligious enthusiast, with no pretensions to literary culture, 
or even to an ordinarily fair education. Into the reasons 
for Dr. Harper's agreement with Mr. Moody we are not 
concerned to inquire. 



July 17, 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 



IN SURANC E. 

J J. HcDONALD, Chicago manager of the Continental, 
, is on the Coast, and will place a man in charge of the 
company's business in Southern California, to relievo Mr 
Shield, who will devote his attention to the country north 
of the Tehachapi. 

The Niagara Fire, which left here during the rate war, 
has concluded to return. 

The Mutual Fire, of New York, has appointed the firm 
of Davis & Henry, at 606 California street, general agents 
for California. Washington, Oregon and Nevada. 

The National Standard Insurance Company ar.d the In- 
surance Company of America have been licensed by Insur- 
ance Commissioner Clunie to do business in this State. W. 
S. Davis has been appointed general agent for the Coast. 

The Fireman's Fund has made a $50,000 deposit with 
the Insurance department of Virginia, and re-entered 
that State for business. 

The Massachusetts Benefit Life has called for another 
extra assessment for this month. 

H. C. Brechenberger, United States manager of the 
Hamburg Bremen, is visiting this city. 

The firm of Smedberg & Mitchell has dissolved. W. R. 
Smedberg has entered the office of L. B. Edwards, and 
Mr. Mitchell will continue to represent the New Zealand. 

Harry F. West, the newly-elected President of the 
Penn Mutual Life, took charge of the office on the first of 
July. 

James Crawford Hanna, agency inspector of the New 
Zealand, is in the city. 

Fire crackers cost the insurance men of this city $10,000 
on the Fourth this year, as against $7,000 in 1896. 

Some of the local agents of Montana desire to report to 
Chicago rather than this city. To settle the question of 
jurisdiction, a San Francisco committee, consisting of 
Wm. J. Dutton, Tom C. Grant, and Holla V. Watt, has 
been appointed by the Board of Fire Underwriters to 
meet General B. J. Smith, Eugene Cary, and Engriie 
Harbeck of Chicago. The Executive Committee of the 
Pacific Board has declined to pay any assessment levied 
by the Montana Board, which has caused much dissatis- 
faction. 

H. E. Webster, of Boston, has been sent to this coast to 
relieve H. G. Comstock, of the Security Mutual Life Coast 
agency. 

E. P. Marshall, Secretary of the Union Central of Cin- 
cinnatti, is spending a week with Pratt & Archibald, 
Coast agents. 

The Mutual Reserve Fund has established a general 
agency in Alaska. 

The Standard Life and Accident will hereafter do a 
steam boiler business. 

Wm. J. Dutton, Vice President of the Fireman's Fund, 
is in the East. 

The Frankfort will hereafter do a personal liability 
business. 

JUST sixty minutes out of the city, over a route of beau- 
tiful water view and country scenery, lies picturesque 
Blythedale in Marin County, and within hailing distance of 
Mill Valley. The hotel is literally buried among the tall 
redwoods, cool, delightful, quiet; and about it are scattered 
cottages, where the guests may set up their own estab- 
lishments in even greater seclusion than is afforded at the 
hotel. The table at Blythedale is supplied with every deli- 
cacy, and every guest is made to feel at home. See Blythe- 
dale and be content. 

THE whole community was surprised and deeply grieved 
to hear early in the week that Colonel Charles F. 
Crocker had received a stroke of paralysis and was not 
likely to recover. The Colonel was at dinner at his country 
home at Uplands when the messenger came; and for the 
past several days he has been very low. He is conscious, 
but there can be no doubt that his recovery is extremely 
improbable. His great affliction has called out universal 
expressions of profound regret and sympathy. 

EL CAMPO ! What crowds visit that fine outing place 
every Sunday ! So accessible, too, and cheap. Four 
boats each way, and the trip made for twenty-five cents. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO, 



SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 

309 and 311 Sansome St. - San Francisco, Ca 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAY, DURHAM & BRODIE 43 and 46 Threadneedle St., London 

SIMPSON, MACKIRDY & CO 29 South Castle St., Liverpool 

INSURANCE. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 



Firemans Fund 



INSURANCE COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000. Assets, $3,500,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager, 439 California St., S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE. 

Fm-nflofl «. D. 1.78?. 

Insurance Gompanu ol North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA, PBNN. 

Paid-up Capital.., '. (3,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 5,033,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 413 California St., S. F. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up 11,000,000 

Assets 3 300.018 

Surplus to Polioy Holders 1.668,332 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager 501 Montgomery St. 

B. J. Smith, Assistant Manager. 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 501 Montgomery St 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON "*"««« 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON NSURANCE CO. *">°r P ora tB a «»• 

BUTLER & HALDAN, General Agents, 

413 California St., S. F. 



BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., 


LIMITED, 




OF LIVERPOOL. 












BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 






No. 316 California St., S. F 



THE THURINGIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Of ERFURT, GERMANY. 
Capital, $3,250,000 Assets. $10,984,248. 
Paoiflo Coast Department: 3C4-208 SANSOME ST., S. F. 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers. 

Tun I inM FIRE INSURANCE CO., Limited, of London. 

InC LIU IH Total cash assets in United States, $88^,797 09 
Tnr IMDCDIAI INSURANCE CO. Limited, of London. 

Int UVIrCnlHL Established on Pacific Coast in lt52. 

WILLIAM J LANOERS Resident Manager. 
Pacific Coast Branch : 235-207 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 17. 1897 




W\m$&?Qv> 



S( i.MK little talk had been going around about the com- 
parative lack of wealth possessed bv the Christian 
lavor delegates to the great Convention, and G. W. 
ander, the grain broker, was hardly surprised when 
Patrolman Tom Walsh stopped him on the street. 

"Do you remember where that five-cent restaurant is. 
Mr. Alexander," asked the policeman. "This young man 
wants a nickel meal." 

Alexander glanced at the youth indicated, noted that he 
was v 1. prosperous looking and that he wore a 

Christian Endeavor badge. Alexander is generous and 
good hearted and he reflected that here was a young man. 
evidently of superior station, who was plainly travelling 
in deucedly hard luck. He felt that the stranger was. in 
a sense, a guest of the city, and he desired, as delicately 
as possible, to alleviate the distress. How to manage it 
he did not know, for the stranger looked like a gentleman. 

"Look here," Alexander finally remarked, with an ef- 
fort. "I cannot allow you to go to a five-cent eating 
house, you know. Please take this quarter, and get a de- 
cent nn 

The Christian Endeavorer laughed long and heartily. Then 
he took from his pocket a handful of twenties and dis- 
played the gold on his palms. 

"You see I'm not broke,'' he said. "I am on a slumming 
trip and wanted to see a place where a meal could be ob- 
tained for a nickel!" 

Alexander kept the quarter. 



Last Sunday was so warm and pleasant that the mem- 
bers of the local battalion of the Naval Brigade, on board 
the training ship Comanche, could not withstand the 
temptation to have a swim. The idea was quickly acted 
upon, and a number of the men and several officers leaped 
from the deck in a general scramble, without thought of 
rank, and with an artless disregard of the conventional 
bathing costume that was almost primitive. Lieutenant- 
Commander Gunn, who was in charge of the monitor that 
day, was temporarily absent from his post during the 
natatorial incident, but when he beard the details, after 
his return, he sent, in high dudgeon, for the chief culprits. 

"I understand you have been swimming, gentlemen." 
said the Lieutenant-Commander, with naval severity. 

"Yes, sir," promptly replied Elliott, the Senior Ensign, 
with a proper show of humble penitence. 

"How were you attired?" pursued the interrogator, 
sternly. 

"Undress uniform," answered Lieutenant Cecil Denis. 

"I insist upon knowing what you men had on," said 
Gunn, who did not propose to be "jollied" by a subordinate. 
"With what were you clothed?" 

"Bearskins," replied the Senior Ensign, softly, and the 
inquiry abruptly terminated. 



Judge Curtis, the "will smasher," of New York, whose 
services have been enlisted in behalf cf Mrs. Craven in her 
litigation against the Fair estate, is an expert on soft and 
hard drinks and the physical effects thereof, but he has 
discovered something decidedly novel in California. 

" It's not in your whiskey, .-ays he. "for that is the 
same that we drink in New York; so it must be in the 
climate. Now, I have tried cases — of whiskey — in all 
parts of the Eastern and Middle States, including Ken- 
tucky, and I have always been considered better than a 
raw hand as a consumer, but I must confess that I have 
lost mv nip or I have been jobbed out here. Why, sir. in 
New York a man can drink all day and never feel it, be- 
cause it sets him to perspiring, and no disagreeable 
effects follow. Out here I feel like a water-logged potato 
all the time, and if I take three drinks the effects both 
physical and mental are simply marvelous. Immediately 
I want to howl at the moon and walk head downward on 
the bottom of a cloud. I can't understand it at all." 



John F. Carrere, Secretary of the State Lunacy Com- 
mission, has several children but is unmarried, his wife 
having died some years ago. During the last Legislature 
he was one of the clerks, and had rooms at the boarding- 
house of, we will say. Mrs. Smith. An acquaintance, Jim 
Mr Kee, stopped with him. McKee wears that peculiar 
contrivance of rubber elastic on his arms which is popu- 
larly thought to be a part of a lady's wardrobe, but which, 
with regard to male apparel, is supposed to keep one's 
cuffs from running over the wearer's hands. To make a 
long story short, these articles look exactly like garters, 
arc elaborately decorated, and since Mr. McKee is mar- 
ried, the presumption was not far fetched, when the 
aforesaid landlady, finding one on the floor soon after Mr. 
McKee's departure, left a note for the genial Major to 
come to the parlor when he reached home that afternoon. 
The Major went, and Mrs. Smith opened up : 

" Major. I have been trying very hard to keep a decent 
house. I never allow women in the gentlemen's bedrooms." 

" What do you mean ? " asked the Major, before whom 
dark suspicions of blackmail loomed. 

" I mean just what I say," wrathfully blurted the irate 
landlady. " If you cannot take your women friends some 
other place, I will thank you for your room." 

"Why, Madam, you are surely mistaken. I have never 
had a woman in my room. I have no lady visitors." 

"Then what does this mean?" she almost shouted as 
she held up the garter-like sleeve-holder. 



The revival of the fad of attending auction sales among 
a class whose necessities require no such effort, naturally 
gladdens the hearts of the auctioneers and increases the 
amount of their commissions. An odd, old-fasbioned couple, 
whose home on Bush street is filled with curios of which 
they are enthusiastic and discriminating collectors, heard 
that at a forthcoming sale a certain rare jar of Satsuma 
ware would be offered to bidders. The husband and wife 
went separately and secretly to the auction, each intend- 
ing to purchase the jar as a gift for the other. They were 
in different parts of the room, and when the jar was put 
up the poor old people were the only would-be purchasers, 
each bidding briskly against the other. The auctioneer 
cleverly fanned the competition, until the bidding reached 
a ridiculously high figure, and the wife finally abandoned 
the chase with a regretful sigh; and her gallant old hus- 
band proudly marched home with the prize. 

He arrived before his wife. When she came home he 
greeted her warmly at the door, and hurried her to the 
table on which stood the precious purchase. "See," said 
he, triumphantly, "what a beautiful piece of Satsuma I 
have bought for you, my dear. I was bound to have it, 
although I had to bid high; for some obstinate old woman 
on the other side of the room seemed determined to cap- 
ture the prize; but I beat her, I beat her," and he shook 
his head with grim delight. 

» * # 

They are telling rather a good story down at Bur- 
lingame at the expense of Robert Coleman, although the 
latter is understood to see nothing funny in the incident. 
On returning to the city by rail not long ago, he befriended 
the porter of the Pullman, upon the plea of the colored 
servitor that he was hungry and penniless, by standing 
treat for a square meal. For the balance of that trip 
Coleman owned car, porter and everything else, to the 
envy of all the other passengers. At the end of the trip, 
the porter obsequiously gathered up his patron's bags and 
traps and followed Coleman from the car. The servility 
of the porter attracted such notice, that Rob dismissed 
him, but first withdrawing a hand from his pocket, held 
out a dollar in bis closed palm. The porter, mistaking 
Coleman's movement, instead of taking the money, took 
the hand and gave it a good shake. 

"Pleased to have met you, sah, I'm shuah, sab," he said 
with typical darkey affability. 
# # # 

Dr. Samuel L. Turlock is a Pittsburg physician who 
started from home a few days ago as a tourist on a Chris- 
tian Endeavor ticket, and ended his trip across the con- 
tinent as a fugitive from justice on a Christian Endeavor 
train. 

While the train on which the doctor was a passenger 



July 17. 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'9 



was standing on the track at IVeth, Nevada, lie saw one 
of thi- of the place emerge from a saloon, atve a 

Piute Indian a bottle of whiskey, anil disappear. The In- 
dian tried in various ways to get the cork out." but without 
success, so Dr. Turlock took a corkscrew from his pocket 
and drew the cork from the bottle. Just as he passed the 
liquor back to the Indian a constable came around the cor- 
ner of the depot, laid forcible hands on the doctor, and in- 
formed him that he had committed a felony in giving liquor 
to a ward of the nation. The physician tried to explain 
his iirnorance of the law and the extenuating circumstan- 
ces of the case, but nothing would wei^'h against the pros- 
pect of some fat fees. When be found the official obdurate 
he asked permission to tret his baggage oft the train, and 
managed to lose himself in the crowd till the traiu pulled 
out. 

When the constable found that his prisoner had escaped 
be telegraphed ahead to constables and sheriffs all along 
the line, and if his fellow passengers had not shielded the 
doctor till he crossed the State of Nevada, he might have 
exchanged his sleeper for a Nevada calaboose. 

* # * 

Very fond of a joke is George James, manager of the 
Selby Smelting Works. He likes to tell them, too, in the 
University Club. He was crossing the ferry the other 
day when he was stopped by a dyspeptic-looking tourist in 
semi-clerical costume. 

"Can you tell me where First street is?" he inquired of 
James. 

"Certainly," said that debonair youLg man. "But are 
you sure you want First street?" 

"Isn't that the principal thoroughfare?" queried the 
traveller. 

"I will tell you something, in strict confidence — " began 
James, reassured as to the invio!ability of his communica- 
tion, he continued: "If you want to see pretty girls, go 
to Kearny street, not First." 

The tourist looked sour, solemnly rebuked his flippant 
guide, — and then started off in the direction of Kearny 

street. 

* * * 



It is said by some of the depositors in the Bank of Cali- 
fornia that an appreciation of the good things of life goes 
farther toward the establishment of a man's credit in the 
eyes of S. Prentiss Smith, the assistant cashier, than any 
other quality. Sam Beaver, the paying teller, is also an 
accomplished gourmet, but his tastes are rather Bohemian, 
while Prentiss Smith prefers dishes of the most refined epi- 
curean style. The other day Mr. Smith met his old friend, 
Edward Bosqui. 

"You're not looking well," remarked the latter. 

"Oh, I have a terrible headache," groaned the banker. 

"Too much wine?" suggested the sympathizing friend. 

"Not too much to drink, but too much to eat," 
replied Smith. "Sam Beaver took me to a restaurant on 
some alley. Food delicious, — quantity generous, — service 
execrable, — but everything appetizing. I went through 
all the courses, and I am sorry for it. The mere mention 
of the name of the proprietor nearly finishes me." 

"Whatishisname?" inquired the lithographer, curiously. 

" 'Dirty Dick,' " groaned the suffering banker. 
* * * 

Having just returned from a trip to Washington, George 
Heazelton was talking in the Bohemian Club of the exceed- 
ingly rapid rate at which trains are run on the Baltimore 
and Ohio railroad. 

"That reminds me of a little reminiscence," said Heazel- 
ton, who is continually reminded of stray incidents by 
chance remarks. "Once when I was crossing to Queens- 
town, the trip was unusually rough, the ship pitched and 
tossed at a frightful rate, and most of the crew and all the 
passengers, with one exception, were fearfully seasick. 
The fortunate traveller was asked to account for his im- 
munity from mal de mer. 

" 'That's easy,' he replied. 'I used to be a brakeman 
on the B. and O. ! ' " 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 
cures Poison Oak and alt skin diseases. The oldest and best remedy, 
which has oured thousands. At all druggists. 

Jackson's Napa Soaa lemonade is a luxury. Try it. 




SUMMER NOVELTIES 
JUST OPENED 



121 Montgomery St., 

Opposite Occidental Hotel. 



W. fi. RAMSEY, 



Merchant 
Tailor. 



Williams Brothers. 
TAILORS. 



( Successors to Thomas S. Williams ) 

111 Sutter Street, Lick House Block 
San Francisco 



The BROOKS-FOLLIS ELECTRIC CO. 

Importers and Jobbers of p I p OTV I? I C A I 

523 Mission St. Tel. Main 861 SUPPLIES 



San Francisco, Cal 



dOlilN D. SULLIUAN 

Attorney-at- Law 
Rooms 34-38, 3d Floor Chronicle Building, San Francisco. 



Nelson's flmijGOSG. 



Unequalled for Poison Oak, Sunburn, all Irritation of the Skin, 
and for the Toilet generally. 

I 




Jtc 



fflubber, 
Cottorij 

jCinen. 



ose. 



For Water, Steam, 
Suction, Gas, Air, 



and other purposes 



1 GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY, 

M E. H. PEASE. Vice-President and Manager. 

I 73-75 FIRST ST., 
si Portland, Or. 



573-575-577-579 MARKET ST. 

San Francisco, m 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 17, 1897. 




FOR once our glorious climate put its best foot fore- 
most when the visiting' strangers were within our 
gates, with the result that naught but words of praise for 
the weather article furnished them during their stay in 
San Francisco has been heard from our recent guests, 
and, while contrasting it with the roasting endured in the 
East, the verdict of the majority was decidedly in favor of 
the West. 

And what a welcome the Christian Endeavorers received ! 
Not only in public, but in private, many residents of the 
city having friends among the members of the Convention 
or those who accompanied them, whom they entertained in 
a way that is often declared to be purely Californian; din- 
ners have been the rule for homes, while land and water 
picnics to different points of interest have been so frequent 
as to defy enumeration. These gentle-mannered, happy, 
pleasant-faced badge wearers, who have been so largely 
in evidence of late, will be missed when they have all de- 
parted, and, while saying to them "good-bye," there has 
always been the addenda of "Come again."' with the fre- 
quent response: " We'd like to stay.' 

July is the month in which fashion betakes itself beyond 
the city limits, and this year it seems to have scattered it- 
self pretty well throughout the State, as members of the 
swim are heard of north, south, and east, to say nothing 
of Alaska and the Sandwich Islands, no one point seem- 
ingly being the favorite unless it be San Rafael and its 
vicinity, which has been muchly sought this summer. The 
Hotel Rafael and its cottages contain a goodly crowd; the 
village and Ross Valley have not enough villas for those 
who would like to take them, and who give dinners and 
little dances among themselves, so that life beneath the 
shadow of Mount Tamalpais has been very pleasant. The 
paper chase last Saturday was a great success, as will be, 
no doubt, the one which takes place to-day, the number of 
hounds increasing with each "meet." 

Residents iu and about Burlingame, San Mateo and 
Menlo Park for the most part incline towards house 
parties, and they are a very charming way of entertain- 
ing people congenial to each other. There are many 
lovely drives thereabouts, an interchange of dinners and 
luncheons at the different homes, races, polo and golf, 
moonlight coaching parties, dances, and gatherings at the 
Burlingame Club House are a few of the pleasures indulged 
in by them. We still continue to hear of the many pleas- 
ant ways in which the national holiday was celebrated, 
perhaps one of the most unique being the nl fresco enter- 
tainment of Miss Manuella Page and her brother Will, 
which partook largely of the character of a Bohemian 
Club midsummer jinks, and those who have never been 
guests at one of them could thusly form an idea of what 
those stag gatherings were like. 

Among recent weddings, one of last week's took place 
on Thursday evening at the Church of St. Mary's the Vir- 
gin, when the Rev. Mr. Bolton performed the ceremony 
which made Miss Es telle Ball and Joseph C. Welsh man 
and wife, after which a reception was held at the home of 
the bride's mother on Van Ness avenue. The Church of 
Notre Dame des Victoires was the scene of a pretty wed- 
ding on Wednesday evening of this week, when Miss Char- 
lotte Van der Naillen and Eugene Kast were the bride 
and groom. 

Mr. Thomas Bergin and General and Mrs. Dickenson 
have been among the recent guests at Lake Tahoe. Mr. 
and Mrs. George Wells and Miss Marie have been added 
to the list of San Franciscans at Bartlett Springs. Recent 
arrivals include Dr. Herzstein, who has been abroad since 
early in the year, Raphael Weil, Northrop Cowles, J. D. 
Spreckels, and Will Crocker. 

A. B. Wilberforce has returned from a two-weeks' vaca- 
tion in the Sierras. 



The news which has just reached here from New York 
of the engagement of young Richard Wilson and Miss 
Kitty Garrison will recall to many old timers the young 
lady's father, at one period a resident of this city. Who 
in San Francisco in the sixties did not know " Billy" Gar- 
rison? Mrs. Garrison was a Californian, being the daugh- 
ter of General Estill, a leading pioneer. Mr. and Mrs. 
Garrison were residents of New York for many years 
previous to his death, and their eldest daughter married 
a scion of the English nobility not long ago. The second 
one, who is now to wed young Wilson, is said to be a girl 
of remarkable beauty, inheriting her father's good looks. 

Dr. M. Herzstein, who has been absent for several 
months in Europe, returned this week, and will resume 
bis extensive practice here. The Doctor greatly enjoyed 
his trip abroad, and he visited during his absence all the 
great medical institutions and sanitariums of the world. 

Dr. and Mrs. Byron W. Haines have been entertaining 
a number of their friends at their beautiful Belvedere 
home, among them Mr. and Mrs. J. Kenneth Butler of 
Cincinnati, who are on a tour of the world. Mrs. Butler 
is a niece of Dr. Haines. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. F. C. Hasson, Mrs. Donaldson of Cin- 
cinnati, Mrs. Bush, Miss Lottie Cerf, and Miss Kate 
Burke, were the guests of Commodore I. Gutte on the 
yacht Chispa, from last Saturday till Tuesday. The cruise 
was about Mare Island, and was very greatly enjoyed. 

The Misses Margaret and Bertha Smedley, of West- 
chester, Penn., are visiting their aunt, Mrs. Colin M. 
Boyd, at her country residence, "Casa Boyd," iu Alameda 
County. 

Amateur theatricals were given by the guests of 
Blythedale last Saturday evening. Mr. and Mrs. John 
Wilson took a prominent part in arranging the entertain- 
ment, which was in every way enjoyable. After the 
theatricals a delightful dance rounded out the evening. 

GEORGE F. Hatton, formerly connected with the Oak- 
land Tribune, has taken up the practice of law in this 

city. 

July is rather a doll month in social circles; but Max Abraham, 
the well-known caterer at 428 Geary street, is busy furnishing 
dinners, banquets, and suppers for the swell events of the season. 
Having great experience, excellent taste and every facility, he is 
prompt and reliable — and always gives perfect satisfaction. 

GREAT Reduction Id prices during the summer months on Art Goods, 
Pictures. Crockery, Glassware, eto S. & G. Gump, 113 Geary street. 



Drink Jackson's Napa Soda before breakfast. 

$1000.oo 

That missing word is not so very hard to find. 
Neither is Schillings Best tea. 
Buy the tea — send us the yellow ticket, and 
your guess. 



iR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
' CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIRER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples. Freckles, Moth 
Patches, Rash, and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on beauty, and defies de- 
tection It has stood the test of 48 years 
and is so harmless » e taste it to be sure 
it Is properlv made Accept no counter- 
feit of similar name. Dr. L. A. Sayre 
said to a lady of the haut-ton (a pa- 
tient): "As you ladies will use them, I 
recommend 'Qouraud's Cream' as the 
least harmful of all the Skin prepara- 
tions," For sale by all Druggists and 
Fancy-Goods Dealers in the United 
States, Canadas, and Europe 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r, 

37 Great Jones St , N . Y . 




July 17. 1897. 



sax FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE PASSING OF THE WAMPUM. 

SltEDEE JOULLIN has finished on Indian picture. 
Its subject is the passing of the wampum. The cus- 
tom of the children of the forest is. when a chief dies, to 
carry the wampum belt he has worn to the heads of other 
tribes to show that he is really dead. For the wampum, 
from the moment it is clasped around the waist of the 
head of the tribe, never leaves it. It is only unclasped at 
death. Joullin has painted a strong picture. The in- 
heritor of the belt, the heir of the dead chief, has called at 
the lodge of an Indian potentate, and, squatted on his 
blanket, exhibits the wampum. The other, whose face is 
bidden, has his pipe in his hand, and gives one the im- 
pression of that perfect stolidity which is the red man's 
prominent characteristic. The color is strong and lux- 
uriant, and the light so managed as to give a broad but 
not exaggerated relief to the figures. There is a fine 
sense of repose in the group, and the drawing, in the dis- 
position of the drapery, to which is given no unnecessary 
value, is soft and accurate, without a suggestion of harsh- 
ness. The sense of solemnity and gravity, which is the 
very spirit of the scene, is forcibly conveyed, and this is 
the first and very best test of artistic fidelity. It means 
that the painter remains above all things true to his 
theme, that he resists all temptations to wander from his 
subject into garish color and firework effects, but inter- 
prets as well and as conscientiously as his abilities go, the 
idea he places on canvas. There is a very nice accuracy 
of detail in Joullin's picture. As a shred of history, where 
facts are the main thing, it is irreproachable, for every 
portion has been painted from the actual model, even to 
the minutest portion of the still life — the properties, as a 
theatrical man would call them. It is in every respect a 
strong and a good picture. It was shipped to New York 
this week, and will probably be exhibited at the hall of the 
American Artists' Association, the best institution of its 
kind in this country. 

J J. O'BRIEN & Co. are having a great sacrifice sale, 
, and next week a special drive in corsets and ladies' 
hosiery and underwear will take place. The goods offered 
at this sale are offered at very much below regular prices. 
Woolen vests, Jersey ribbed cloth vests, ladies' tan bose 
in many shades, and other goods are included in this sale. 
Having been purchased for cash at a very material re- 
duction, the regular prices have been almost cut in half. 
This is an excellent opportunity to purchase really first- 
class hosiery, corsets and underwear at remarkably low 
figures. O'Brien & Co.'s well-known methods of doing 
business are a guarantee that these fine lines of season^ 
able goods are particularly worthy of attention by the 
ladies of San Francisco. 



THE country around San Rafael abounds in beautiful 
roads and romantic driveways. The numerous guests 
at Hotel Rafael are admirably prepared to enjoy them, 
for General Warfield sees to it that everything contrib- 
uting to their pleasure is at command. There is connected 
with the hotel a splendidly equipped stable under the man- 
agement of C. F. Ackley, where anything from a dog cart 
to a four-in-hand can be had at a moment's notice. Spick 
and span rigs and fine riding horses, everything up to 
date and strictly first-class. 

GREAT changes have been made at Congress Springs 
the past year. The hotel has been rebuilt, sanitary 
plumbing has been put in, and running water in every 
room. Every apartment is light and airy, with perfect 
ventilation. Congress Springs is under the capable man- 
agement of J. S. Mathews, who has spared no expense to 
make it one of the most popular resorts in the State of 
California. The table at the Springs is a prominent feat- 
ure. It is supplied with every dainty, and the service 
throughout is first-class. 

Few celebrated strangers ever visited San Francisco who failed to 
take dinner at the Maison Riche, corner Geary street and Grant 
avenue. A splendid dinner is prepared there every evening from 5 to 
9 o'clock, at which everything to tempt the taste and contribute to 
the pleased appetite is served in faultless manner. Fine music, rich 
wines and careful, polite service are features at the Maison Kiche. 

Jackson's Napa Soda kills malaria. 



A GOWN OF OLD BR OCADE -nor MMftt o*te*t< in lire. 

She wore her grandma's old brooad6 

All trimmed wiih olden lace, 
The same old gown, the same old braid, 

A new ami >\veeter fare; 
The while we whirled in dreamy waltz 

My thoughts in fancy Hew, 
I wondered was the world as false 
When that old lace was new. 

'Did hearts as often sigh and break? 

Hid sorrow walk the land? 
Ihd circumstance make men forsake 

The future they had planned? 
Were ears by subtle flattery fed? 

Were friends, as now, untrue? 
Did maids for love, not wealth, then wed, 

When that old lace was new? 

Or did an honest heart and hand 

Above all else suffice 
To merit praise, and virtue stand 

Pre-ermnent o'er vice? 
Was fashion's whirl as giddy then? 

Did hopes of fame imbue 
The hearts and brains of worldly men, 

When that old lace was new? 

The music ebbs and dies away, 

Reflections lose their charm, 
A face looks up in winning way, 

A hand is on my arm. 
Love reigns supreme to-day as then, 

We learn by rote to woo, 
The same old passion lives in men 

As when that lace was new. 



IF copper is put away damp, or in a damp place, it cor- 
rodes, and produces a strong poison. It is also acted 
upon by fat and oil. Therefore, when copper vessels have 
been used for preparing food, fat should never be suffered 
to remain in them. Many cases of poisoning have occurred 
from soup or other food, into which fat entered largely, 
having been left some time in copper boilers. 

Indigestion dies where Jackson's Napa Soda lives. 
The best of Pills are Beecham's. 



Gonrct Oolong. 



The oldest and most reliable brand on the 
market. Sold only in 1-3 pound papers at 
20 cents per paper. All grocers keep it. 

Tho I nroiim A Preparatory sohool for the University, Law, and 
1 IIO LybCllNI Medical Colleges. 
Candidates are thoroughly prepared in all subjects for the entrance ex- 
aminations of Harvard or Yale, as well as for Stanford, the University of 
California, and the affiliated oolleges References, Professor Jordan or 
any Stanford professor. The school is accredited with Stanford Univer- 
sity and Cooper Medical College. 

PHELAN BUILDING, Corner O'Fan ell and Market Sts. 

GEORGE W. SHREVE, l? E M E A E ^ ET 

Headquarters for Hunters 1 , Anglers 1 , and 

Sportsmen's Goods. 

Guns, Fishing Tackle, Athletic Goods. 

Supplies for Hunters, Campers, Wheelmen, Boxers, 
Base Bailers, Trampers . Bed rock prices. 
\ Send for catalogue. Ttl. Clay 41. 

If you have any doubt, consult the 

California Title Insurance and Trust Go. 

Insurance policies guaranteeing titles to be 
perfect issued and abstracts made and con- 
tinued. Money to loan on real estate. 
Office— Mills Building. 
Howard E. Wright, Secty; A. J. Carmany, Mgr, 




IS YOUR 

TITLE 

PERFECT? 

Chas. Page, Pres, 



HD D I nr\ Dn'Q RESTORATIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the genu- 
Un. nlUUnU O ine— A specific for Exhausted Vitality, Physical, 
Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
and the medical oelebrities. Agents for California and the Pacific States. 
J. Q. STEELE & CO., 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 
Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED— Box of 50 pills, «1 25; Of 100 pills, »2; ofSOOpills, 
13 50; of 400 pills, i6; Preparatory Pills S2. Send for circular. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 17, 1897. 



NOT ES OF THE ARMY AND NAVVY. 



Commodore Crowninshield, Chief of the Bureau of Navi- 
gation, U. S. N., has directed that all of the appreutices 
on the training ship Essex, who are competent, be trans- 
ferred to the general naval service as apprentices of the 
second class. By this action the navy has gained more of 
a class of young seamen who are Americanizing and in- 
creasing the efficiency and intelligence of the service. The 
young idea has an excellent chance for advancement in the 
naval service now and many parents who do not know ex- 
actly what to do with their boys would do well to enlist 
them as apprentices. 

The fact that Brigadier-General H. C. Merriam, U. S. 
A., has no idea of retiring before he reaches the age limit 
of active service, will in all probability end the series of 
promotions, and retirements of staff offices which began 
with the promotion of General Wheaton some week ago. 

The Navy Department is making preparations to ex- 
pend more than a million of dollars on vessels of the Navy 
as soon as the appropriation for the next fiscal year be- 
comes available. About $50(1,000 will be spent on repairs 
to the Concord, Baltimore, Mohican, Charleston, Ranger, 
Hartford, and Pensacola now at the Mare Island Navy 
Yard. As soon as the Baltimore is completed, the Phila- 
delphia will be placed out of commission and thoroughly 
repaired at a cost of $150,000. 

There is an increasing disposition on the part of officers 
of the army and navy lp acquire a knowledge of foreign 
languages, as it better tits them to serve in official posi- 
tions abroad, and these billets are much sought for. The 
younger officers in both services should take a tip from 
this paragraph. 

The department infantry and cavalry competitions will 
be held in September or October, according to the con- 
vcniecceof the departments. 

Orders were received at Tacoma on July 8th., for the 
Oregon to proceed to Port Angeles and take on coal. 
Last Mondav she was ordered to sail to Honolulu to re- 
lieve the Philadelphia and the Marion. It is not thought 
that there is any particular significance in the assignment 
of the big battle-ship to Hawaiian waters. 

The Adams is exiected to arrive here next Monday 
after her long cruise with apprentices. 

The Baltimore will be ready for service in August and 
will then be the Hag-ship of the Pacific Squadron with 
Rear Admiral .1. N. Miller, U. S. N., in command. 

The battleship Wisconsin, now under construction for 
the Pacific squadron, will not be completed until 1899. 

The Thetis, now at Mare Island, is to be placed out of 
commission. 

The Boston is at Kobe, Japan. 

The training ship Adams is at Victoria, B. C. 

Lieutenant-General J. M. Schoneld, U. S. A., retired, 
and his family are passing the summer at Mount Desert, 
Me., near Bar Harbor. 

Brigadier-General Anson Mills, U. S. A., has been re- 
tired from active service at his own request. 

Brigadier-General II. C. Merriam, U. S. A., has quali- 
fied in his new rank and been assigned to the command of 
the Department of the Columbia with headquarters at 
Vancouver. Wash. 

General George H. Weeks. Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment, U. S. A., completed his inspection of the military 
posts here last Saturday and left on Monday for Los 
Angeles. 

Rear Admiral Walker. T s. X.. retired, has been ap- 
pointed a member of the Nicarauiruan Canal Commission 

Commander W. T. Swinburne, TJ. S. N.. has assumed 
command of the Helena. 

Commander Charles H. Davis, U. S. N., has been 
ordered to take charge of the Naval Observatory. 

Lieutenant Commander Frederick M. Symonds, U.S. 
N., has been promoted to the rank of Commander. 

Commander D. W. Mullan, U. S. N.. who was tried on a 
charge of drunkenness by a court martial and was sen- 
tenced to dismissal from the service, has had his sentence 
mitigated by President McKinley to being reduced to the 
foot in the rank of Commander, and suspended for five 
years on furlough pay, and lose all numbers during that 
period. 



Lieutenant Commander G. Blocklinger, U. S. N., will 
report for duty at the Mare Island Navy Yard next 
Tuesday, and will serve on the Board of Inspection there 
on August 28. 

Chief Engineer F. H. Eldridge, U. S. N., has been de- 
tached from the Nava' Academy and ordered to the Helena. 

Mrs. J. S. Ogden, wife of Chief Engineer Ogden, U. S. 
N., has come out from Washington, D. C, to pass the 
summer with her husband, who is attached to the Benning- 
ton. 

Dr. John Godfrey, U. S. M. C, who has been in charge 
of the Marine Hospital here for some time, has been trans- 
ferred to the station at Detroit. This is in the nature of 
a promotion. 

Assistant Surgeon J. F. Leys, U. S. N., has been de- 
tached from the Vermont and ordered to the Helena. 

Assistant Paymaster J. H. Merriam, D. S. N., has been 
detached from the Vermont and ordered to the Helena. 

Major William L. Haskin, First Artillery, U. S. A., has 
been promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel and as- 
signed to the Second Artillery. He is now on leave of ab- 
sence at Waterford. Conn. 

Lieutenant Colonel John I. Rodgers, Second Artillery, 
U. S. A., has been promoted to the rank of Colonel and 
assigned to the Fifth Artillery. 

Major W. M. Maynadier, TJ. S. A., retired, and his wife 
are residing with their son-in-law and daughter, Captain 
and Mrs. G. L. Scott, Sixth Cavalry, U. S. A., at Ash- 
land, Wis. Major Maynadier was formerly Paymaster in 
this Department and for several years resided at the Oc- 
cidental Hotel. 

Major William H. Heuer, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., 
has been ordered to take station in this city and relieve 
Captain Cassius E. Gillette, U. S. A., of his present duties. 

Major Thomas M. K. Smith, First Infantry, U. S. A., 
has been relieved from duty at San Diego Barracks and 
ordered to the command of Benicia Barracks. 

Captain James Chester, Third Artillery, TJ. S. A., has 
been promoted to the rank of Major. He has been as- 
signed to duty at Fort Canby, Wash. 

Captain James M. Ingalls, First Artillery, TJ. S. A., has 
been promoted to the rank of Major. 

Captain Cunliffe H. Murray, Fourth Cavalry, U. S. A., 
is now on college duty at Storrs, Conn. 

Mrs. W. H. Baldwin, wife of Captain Baldwin, TJ. S. A., 
has returned from her Eastern trip accompanied by her 
children, Herbert and Marian. 

Captain and Mrs. Gilbert P. Cotton, First Artillery, 
TJ. S. A., are now in England on their wedding trip. They 
will return from abroad late in November. 

Captain J. M. Cahill, TJ. S. A., retired, is passing the 
summer with his friend, Lieutenant C. F. Parker, TJ. S. 
A., at Fort Schuvler. N. Y. 

Captain W. E. Wilder, Fourth Cavalry, TJ. S. A., and 
his family are on a two months' visit in Auburn, N. Y. 

Captain John McClellan, Fifth Artillery, TJ. S. A., is 
absent from duty on a month's leave, and has permission 
to apply for an extension of one month from August 1st. 

Captain A. W. Vogdes, Fifth Artillery, L T . S. A., now 
at Fort Mason, has been granted one month's leave of ab- 
sence, to take effect July 31st. 

Captain Leonard Wood, Assistant Surgeon, TJ. S. A., 
has been appointed a member of the board of officers who 
will meet at the Army Medical Museum on September 27th, 
to examine candidates for admission to the Medical Corps 
of the army. 

Lieutenant Clermont L. Best, First Artillery, TJ. S. A., 
has been promoted to the rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant John D. C. Hoskins, Third Artillery, TJ. S. 
A., has been promoted to the rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant Thomas Connolly, First Infantry, TJ. S. A., 
has been granted six months' leave of absence, with per- 
mission to go beyond the sea. 

Lieutenant G. O. Squier, Third Artillery, TJ. S. A., has 
gone to Europe to travel for about three months. He will 
make a special study of the improvements in electrical 
science. 

Ensign Edward Moale, TJ. S. N., Ensign C. Davis, TJ. 
S. N., and Ensien H. C. Macfarland, TJ. S. N., have been 
ordered to the Helena. 

Cadet J. J. Raby, TJ. S. N., has been ordered to the In- 
dependence. 



July i;, 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTKR. 



23 



Lieutenant anil Mrs. .1. T. Kerr. Seventeenth Infantry, 
-jiled for Japan hist Monday. Ttn'ir address 
until December 1st will be in care of the American Consul 
General at Yokohama. 

Lieutenant Charles J. Bailey. First Artillery. 1". S. A., 
has left New Orleans to pass July and August in traveling 
in the Eastern States. 

Lieutenant II. M. Hroadbont. U. S. R. C. S., has been 
granted thirty days' leave of ahsence. 

Lieutenant C. Laird. (J. S. N., has been detached from 
the New Yo; k and ordered to the Helena. 

Lieutenant C. E. Yrieland. U. S. X., has been detached 
from the Massachusetts and ordered to the Helena as 
executive officer. 

Lieutenant A. W. Grant, U. S. N., has been detached 
from the Naval Academy and ordered to the Helena. 

Lieutenant F. S. Carter. D, S. N., was detached from 
the Independence last Saturday, ordered home, and 
granted two months' leave of absence. 

Lieutenant W. P. Pence, Fifth Artillery, U. S. A., will 
be relieved from duty at the Artillery School next month, 
and will report for duty at the Military Academy on Au- 
gust 20th. 

Lieutenant James H. Reeves, Fourth Cavalry, U. S. A., 
has been transferred to the Sixth Cavalry. 

Lieutenant Elmer Lindsley, Sixth Cavalry, TJ. S. A., 
has been transferred to the Fourth Cavalry. 

Lieutenant John T. Martin, Fifth Artillery, U. S. A., 
who has been on duty at the Ohio State University at 
Columbus, Ohio, has been transferred to the First Artil- 
lery, Battery M. 

Lieutenant Edward F. McGlaohlin, First Artillery, 
U. S. A., has been transferred to the Eighth Artillery. 

Lieutenant Andrew G. C. Quay, Third Cavalry, U. S. A., 
has been appointed Assistant Quartermaster, and pro- 
moted to the rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant William N. McKelvy, U. S. M. C, has been 
ordered detached from the marine guard of the Olympia 
and directed to proceed to Washington, D. C, via San 
Francisco. 

Lieutenant G. L. Dyer, TJ. S. N., will sail from New 
York next Tuesday for Spain to act as naval attache at the 
United States Legation in Madrid. 

Second Lieutenant John Power Hains, Third Artillery, 
U.S.A., has been promoted to the rank of First Lieutenant. 

Second Lieutenant Archibald Campbell, Third Artillery, 
U. S. A., has been promoted to the rank of First Lieu- 
tenant. 

Second Lieutenant Edward F. McGlachlin Jr., Fifth 
Artillery, U. S. A., has been promoted to the rank of 
First Lieutenant and assigned to the First Artillery. 

The Monadnock arrived at Eureka, Cal., last Tuesday. 
The vessel will remain there two weeks to allow the Fifth 
Battalion of the Naval Reserves to drill on board twice a 
day. 

Additional Second Lieutenant Lloyd England, Third Ar- 
tillery, U. S. A., has been promoted to the rank of Second 
Lieutenant. 

Lieutenant William M. Crofton, First Infantry, U. S. 
A., was recently the guest at Governor's Island, N. Y., 
of Lieutenant L. H. Strother, U. S. A., and aid-de-camp 
to General Merritt, U. S. A. 

Mr. Frank A. Briggs, of this city, has been appointed a 
cadet at the Naval Academy. Mr. Daniel J. Murphy has 
been appointed alternate. 

Lieutenant Colonel Samuel B. M. Young, Fourth Cav- 
alry, U. S. A., has been promoted to the rank of Colonel. 
He is now on duty at Yellowstone Park, but was formerly 
stationed at the Presidio. He and his two charming 
daughters have many friends here who will be pleased to 
hear of his promotion. 

Major Benjamin F. Pope, Surgeon, U. S. A., now at 
Angel Island, has been ordered to report to the command- 
ing officer at Columbus Barracks, Ohio, for duty as soon 
as he is relieved by Major William H. Corbusier, Surgeon, 
U. S. A., who has been stationed for some time at Fort 
Monroe, Va. 

Major Michael Cooney, Fourth Cavalry, U. S. A., has 
been promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. 

Captain William A. Thompson, Fourth Cavalry, U. S. 
A., has been promoted to the rank of Major. 



The Pints arrive.) here from Alaska last Tuesday, under 

■'. of the Alert. She has been sent to "rotten row," 

at Mare Island, to bleach her ancient bones in the marine 

graveyard. 

Additional Second Lieutenant James W. Hinckley Jr., 
Fifth Artillery. U. S. A., has been promoted to the rank 
of Second Lieutenant. 

One of the three new torpedo boats will be constructed 
by the Wolf Wicker Company, of Seattle, Wash. 



Fink Watch and Jewelry Repairing. Low prices. All worU guaran- 
teed. J. N. Brlttan, watchmaker and jeweler. 20 Geary street. 



See Rome and die: drink Jackson's Napa Soda and live. 

7 f7\ 3080-3022 Sixteenth St ® 

'. ^/jr/re?e. Branch— 2704 Mission © 

* *""«"«'.> Tel. Mission 161 ® 

Jroi/se and u/grn ^Painting 



Whitening and Papei Hanging, % 
Dealer in wall paper, etc. fo 



Meliingham ffiay 

Smprovomont 

Company, 



Mills at New "Whatcom, on 
BellingttamBay.Puget Sound, 
Washington 



Jobbing and Retail 
Lumber Yard: 

Sansome and Chestnut 
Streets, San Francisco 



Douglas Fir (Oregon Pine). Spruce and other Pacitic 
Coast Lumber; Laths, Ship Stock, Pickets, Shingles, etc. Unsurpassed 
quality, any quantity, lowest prices, prompt delivery, liberal treatment. 

Full information al 22 MARKET ST. 



BRUSHES 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, bil- 
liard tables, brewers, book-binders, candy-makers, 
canners, dyers, flour-mills, foundries, laundries, 
paper-hangers, printers, painters, shoe factories. 
stable men, tar-roofers, tanners tailors, etc 



BUCHANAN BROS., 

B RUSH MANUFACTURERS, 609 Sacramento St. ,S. F Tel. 5610. 

J. D. Spreckels & Bros. Company, 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 



General Agents 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 
GILLTNGHAM CEMENT. 
3»7 riARKET ST., Corner Fremont, S. P. 

DR. BYRON W. HAINES 



14 Grant Avenue 
Rooms 16-17-18-19 



Dentist 



over "Gity of Paris.' 



DR. ARTHUR T. REGENSBURGER, 

Dentist, 



Office and Residence, 409V* Post street, San Francisco. 
Office Hours, 9 to 12 A. M. ; 1 to 5 p. M. 



Telephone Clay 84 



Dr. F. G. PAGUE 

Dentist 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy of sciences Building, 



819 Market street 



DRS. DERBY X WINTER, Dentists, 

Ot 206 KEARNY STREET, removed to Room 33, Flood Build- 
ing, Market and Fourth Streets. 
Telephone, Clay 391. 



24 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 17, 1897. 



By I^ail, Boat and Sta^e. 



Southern Pacific Co.==Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 



Leave. \ 



From July 1, 1897. 



I Arrive 



•«:0OA Nlles, San Jose, and way stations. 

7:00a Atlantic Express, Ogdenand East .. 

7:00 a Benlcla. Sacramento, Oroville, and Redding, via Davis 

7:00 A Vacavllle :iml Rumsi-j -- 

7 :30 A Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Callstoga, Santa Rosa 

8:80 a Niles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, Saoramento, Marysvllle, 

Chico. Tehama, and Red Bluff 

•8:80 a Peters, MUtoo. and Oakdale 

0:00a New Orleans Express, Merced. Fresno, Bakersfleld, Santa 
Barbara, Los Angeles, Demlng, El Paso, New Orleans, and 



9:00 a 

•i :66 p 

1:00 P 
1:80 P 
4:00 p 

4:0OP 



5:00 p 

5:00p 
8:UU p 
8:00 P 
18:00P 
8:00 p 



East. 

Vallejo 

Nlles, San Jose Llvermore. and Stockton 

Sacramento River steamers 

Nlles, San Jose, and Llvermore 

Martinez and Way Stations 

Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Callstoga, El Verano 

and Santa Rosa 

Benlcla, Winters. Woodland, Knight's Landing, Marys- 
vllle. Oroville. and Sacramento 

Lathrop. Stockton, Modesto, Merced, Raymond (for Yosem- 
lte) and Fresno, going via Nlles, returning via Martinez.. 
Los Angeles Express, Tracy, Fresno, Mojave (for Rands- 
burg), Santa Barbara, and Los Angeles 

Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, (or Mojave and East — 

European mall, Ogden and East 

Hay wards, Nlles and San Jose 

Vallejo ... 

Oregon Express, Sacramento, Marysvllle, Redding, Port- 
land, Puget Sound and East 



8:45 p 
5 :45 p 

8:45 p 
6:15p 

4:15p 
•7:15 P 



6:15 p 
12:15 P 

7:15P 
•9:00P 

8:45 A 

7:45 P 

9:15a 



12:15 p 

7.45A 
6:15p 

10:15 A 
7:45a 

t7:45P 

7:45 A 



San Lkandko and Haywakds Local. (Foot of Market St.) 



WOO Al 
8:00 A 


MELKOSE, 


[ 7:15 a 


Seminary Park, 


(9:45 A 


9:00A 


FlTCBBURO, 


10:45 A 


10:00 A 


El.MHDRST. 


11:45 A 


<11 .00 A 


San Lkandro. 


12:45 P 


}12:00 u 


SodthSan Leandro, 


H:45 p 


2:00 P 


EBTUDXTjLO, 


J2:45 p 


t8:00 P 


Lorenzo, 


4:45 P 


4:00 P 


Cherry, 


'5:45 P 


5:00 P 


and 


8:15 P 


5:30 P 


Haywards. 


7:45 p 


7:00 p 




8:45 P 


8:00 P 


i Runs through to Nlles. 


9:45 p 


9:00 P 


t From Nlles 


10:50 p 


ttll:l6 p 




tt+12:00 P 



Sa nta C h dz Di vi sion (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

17:4ft A SantuCru/. Excursion, Simla Cruz & principal way stations $8:05 P 

8:15 a Newark, Centervllle, San Jose, Felton, Houlder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 5:50 P 

•2:16 p Newark, Centervllle, San Jose. New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations *10:5ua 

4 : 16 p San Jose and Qlenwood 9 :30 / 

14:15 P Felton and Santa Cruz §9:30 A 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— *7:15, 9:00, and 
11:00 A. M., 11:00. *2:00. 13:00. M:00, J5:00 and *6:00P. II. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— M:00, 8:00, 10:00 A. u .: 112:00, *1:00, 
18 :00, »3 :00, t4 :00 «6 :00 P. M. 

Coast Division (Third and Townsend streets). 

•7:00a San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesdays only) 1:30 p 
17:30 a Sunday excursion for San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, 

and principal way stations I8;35 P 

9:00 a San Jose, Tres Plnos, Santa Cruz, Paclflo Grove, Paso Robles 

San Luis Obispo, Guadalupe. Surf and principal way stations 4 : 15 p 

10:40 a San Jose and way stations 9:45a 

11 :30 A Palo Alto and way stations 6:25 p 

•2:80 p San Mateo. Redwood, Menlo Park. Santa Clara. San Jose, 

Gilroy. Hollister, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, Pacific 

Grove *10:30 A 

•3:30 p San Jose. Santa Cruz, Pacltlc Grove and way stations •"•30 p 

*4 :30 p San Jose and Wav Stations »8:06A 

5:80 p San Jose and principal way stations *8 45a 

6:80p San Jose and way stations.. 0:35 a 

tll:46p San Jose and way stations J 7*30 p 



a for Morning. 
iSund ays only 

i Saturdays and Sundays 



p for Afternoon. 'Sundays excepted. tSaturdays only. 
tt Monday, Thursday, and Saturday nights only. 
^Sundays and Mondays. 



The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other Information. 



Thfc f<Panf1 Parifir 3m Stockton St. San Francisco. 
I IIO Ul dllU rdOIIIUf MRS. ELLA CORBETT. Proprietress, 

jyumisned rooms by the day, week, or month Telephone: Grant. S07. 



San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 



SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. TiBDRON FERRY- Foot of Market Street. 
WEEK DA YS— 7 :30, 9 :U0, 1 1 :U0 A H ; 12 :35, 3 :S0 5 : 10, 6 :30 P M. Thursdays- 
Extra tripat 11:30 p u. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :50and 11 :30 p m. 
SUNDAYS— 8 :00, 9 :80. 1 1 :00 A M ; 1 :30. 3 :30, 5 :00, 8 :20 P M. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:10,7:50.9:20, 11:10 ah; 12:45, 3:40, 5:10 pm. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1:5£> and 6:35pm. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 A m; 1:40,3:40,5:00,8:25 P M. 

Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave 


S. F. 


In Effect June 13, 1897 


ARRIVE IN S. F. 


Week Days. 


Sundays- 

8:00 am 
9:30 am 
5:00 pm 


Destination. 


Sundays 

10:40 AM 1 
6:10PM I 
7:35 pm 


Week Days 


7:30am 
3:30pm 
5:10 PM 


Novato, 

Petaluma, 

Santa Rosa. 


8:40 AM 
10:25 AM 
6:22 pm 




8:00 am 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyservllle. Cloverdale 






7:30 am 
3:30 pm 


7:35PM 


6:22 p M 


7:30 AM 
3 :30 PM 


8:00 AM 


Hopland, Uklah 


7:35 PM 


10:25 AM 
6:22 P M 


7:30AM 
3:30PM 


8:00 am 


Quernevllle. 


7:35PM 


10:25 A M 
6:22 P M 


7:30 AM 

5:10pm 


8:00AM 
5:00 pm 


Sonoma, 

Glen Ellen. 


10:40 am 
6:10pm 


8:40 A M 
6:22 P M 


7:30am 
3:30pm 


8:00am 
5:00 pm 


Sebastopol. 


10:40 am I 
7:35 PM | 


10:25 A M 
6:22 P M 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs: at Geyservllle 
for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for High- 
land Springs. Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport, and Bartlett Springs; at 
Ukiah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Laurel Del 
Lake. Upper Lake, Porno, Potter Valley, John Day's, Riverside. Lier- 
ley's, Bucknell's Sashedoin Heights, Hullville, Booneville, Orr's Hot 
Springs, Mendocino City. Ft. Bragg. Westport, Usal. 

Saturday -to- Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 

TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 
A. W. FOSTER, Pres. & Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass. Agent. 

Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 

Steamers leave Broadway Wharf, San Francisco for ports in Alaska, 
9 A. m.. July 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and every 5th day thereafter. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports, 9 a. m.. July 5. 10, 15, 
20. 25. 30, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), Steamer "Pomona," at 2 p.m. July 5, 9, 
13, 17, 21,26,30 ; Aug. 3. 7. II, 16. 20, 24, 28; Sept. 1,6, 10, 14, 18.22.27. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, at 9 a.m.; July 1, 5, 9, 13, 
17. 21, 25, 29, and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford Santa Barbara, Port Los 
Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles) and Newport, 11 a. m., July 3, 7, 11. 15, 
19, 23 27, 31 and every fourth day thereafter. 

For Ensenada, Magdalena Bay, San Jose del Cabo, Mazatlan, Altata. La 
Paz. Santa Rosalia, and Guaymas (Mexico), steamer "Orizaba," 10 A. «.. 
the 2d of each month. 

The company reserves the right to change, without previous notice, 
steamers, sailing dates, and hours of sailing. 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Montgomery street. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'lAgentB, 10 Market at, S. F. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf. FIRST AND BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p m., for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, 

calling at Kobe (Hlogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at 

Hongkong with steamers for India, etc No cargo received on board on 

day of sailing, 

Doric (via Honolulu) Tuesday. July 27, 1897 

BBLGIC Saturday, August 14, 1897 

Coptic (via Honolulu) .Thursday, September 2,1897 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, Septembers!. 1897 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office. No. 421 Market street, 
corner First. D. D. STUBBS. Secretary. 

S. S. "Moana." Thursday, July 22d. at 2 p m 

S S "Australia", for Honolulu only, Tuesday, 

August 10th. at 2 p m. 

Line to Coolgardle, Australia, and Capetown, 

South Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO., 
Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight office, S27 
Market St., San Francisco. 



EAN1C 




(ofiprcu- 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Alpha Con. Mill and Mining Company. 

Assessment No IB 

Amount por Share \.\V.V.'.'.'.'""".TB cents 

Levied Tulv »i«B 

Delinquent In Olllce August i-'iw; 

Day or Sale or Delinquent Stock ...September 2,' 18»7 

„_ „ „ „ CHARLES E. ELLIOT. Secretary 

Calfforril. m Nt Vilda Blocl1 ' »>• Montgomery street, San Francisco, 

e^f^ n 6 !?, 3 ^ WOmen l^B d ^ e g re t a1^ A an^. 
©dy. It gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 328 Mar- 
ket street, San Francisco. (Seed for circular.) • ••••«»* 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 

Estate of JAME8 S. BENNET, Deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, A. C Freese. Administrator 
state of James S Beonet, deceased, to the creditors of, and all per- 
sons having claims against the said deceased, to exhibit them, with the 
DiHTssarv vouchers, within four months after the first publication of this 
noticu. io the said Administrator, at room 35, Chronicle building, corner 
Geary iind Kearny streets. San Francisco, Cal., the same being his place 
for the transaction of the business of the said estate in the City and 
County of San Fraoolsoo, State of California. 

A.C. FREESE, Administrator of the Estate of James S. Bennet, Deceased. 
J D SrixiVAN. Attorney for the Administrator. 
Dated at San Francisco, July 2. 1897. 



PANORAMIC SERIES, PLATE 70. 



WITH S. F. NEWS LETTER, JULY 24,1897. 




PICTURESQUE CALIFORNIA. 



J'nltrr I'ho'o B. F. 



YOSEMITE VALLEY-Upper and Lower Yosemite Falls. 



Price per Copy. 10 I 




s an "^S? 1 *©* 




Annual Subscription, $4.00 



i&ixlii x>rra1f3u>tar;ti sjer. 




FoMf'. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 24, 1897. 



Number 4. 



Printed and Published terry Saturday by the proprietor . F B M D MABBJO'J J 
b% Kearny street. San Praneiseo. Entered at Han Francisco Post, 
office a* Second-class Matter. 

Tke office of the NEWS LBTTBB in Xew York City is at Temple Court; 
and at Chicago. 903 Boyce Building. {Frank K Morrison, Eastern 
Bepresentatite), where information maybe obtained regarding subscrip- 
tion and advertising rates. 



THE approaching pure food exposition, to be held 
the Mechanics' Pavilion, promises to be a great si 
cess, as nearly all the available space has been allotted 



at 



THE Jacob Z. Davis will has been declared valid by the 
expert on handwriting who was retained to prove 
that fact. It woald be quite as unusual for an expert on 
handwriting to give an opinion of value as it would be to find 
an attorney hired by a litigant who would accept a re- 
tainer from the other side ; perhaps a little more so — in 
San Francisco. 

THE gentleman appointed to superintend the building 
of the new Postoffiee and custom house here has ar- 
rived from Washington. If the future history of that 
structure may be judged by its past, Architect Roberts is 
a suitable object for congratulation. A life position is a 
most excellent thing to have — particularly when it is 
located in the delightful climate of San Francisco. 

CALIFORNIA has extended an invitation to President 
McKinley to visit this State, and, if he accepts, he 
will find that California hospitality is not measured by the 
wave of prosperity of which he was declared to be the ad- 
vance agent. The Golden West will keep open house dur- 
ing his stay, and send him homeward with the fact thor- 
oughly established that we can produce many things here 
besides small Republican majorities. 



AS time advances the concert of Europe appears to be 
approaching a decided forte movement. The Turk is 
performing on the bull fiddle with emphasis, while the 
plaintive pianissimo of the Greek is lost in the general tun- 
ing of the instruments. When the bandmaster finally 
waves his baton for the powers to play, there will likely 
come the crash which the world has been predicting and 
fearing the last quarter century. And the Sick Man will 
head the procession. 

THE Supervisors are besieged with proposals for the 
recognition and endorsement of all manner of pave- 
ments. Wooden blocks, and a foundation of iron for 
basalt, are among the latest candidates, and, while they 
are widely different materials, it is probable that one 
would stand the wear and tear about as well as the other. 
As well try a pavement of good intentions. They are very 
popular on the most traveled highway of which we have 
any knowledge. 

IT is fortunate that Eugene V. Debs proclaimed his true 
sentiments some time ago, when he declared in Chicago 
that his followers were prepared to overturn Government 
and law by ball and bayonet if they could not peaceably 
reach their ends. The country knows him for what he is— 
a blatant demagogue and an enemy of everything law- 
abiding men hold dear. He is now engaged in organizing 
a "social democracy." Organization does not mean honest 
labor. With a tireless jaw for capital and the idle and 
ignorant for followers, this anarchist is hastening toward 
the penitentiary as rapidly as his environments will per- 
mit; but his progress is somewhat hampered by his ears. 



AS the investigation proceeds the rottenness of the In- 
ternal Revenue office, under Collector Welburn, be- 
comes more and more apparent. It seems positively as- 
tounding that a condition of affairs such as prevailed in 
that office, could have obtained for twelve months without 
discovery. Collector Welburn promises to put an entirely 
different face on the matter as soon as ex-Chief Deputy 
Loupe recovers from his illness. We fear from the dis- 
closures now being made that Loupe will never recover. 

T^HE Board of Health has acted with commendable 
1 promptness in ordering Food Inspector Dockery to 
refuse the distribution of milk from Oakland dairies until 
the dairymen across the bay have submitted their cows to 
the tuberculin test, which is applied to all other herds. 
The Oakland Council refused to allow the test accepted 
elsewhere for the detection of this disease ; hence the 
prompt action of the San Francisco Board of Health. All 
should be treated alike. Really we cannot afford to make 
milk of one and tuberculosis of the other. 



THE review by the Supreme Court of the decision by 
which the franchise for a garbage crematory was 
given to F. E. Sharon, would in all likelihood be in the in- 
terest of the city. The Merchants' Association is of opin- 
ion that the crematory should be operated by the munici- 
pality; and under some conditions this might be true, but 
not under the system that would be possible at present. 
It would become a part of the machine before the mortar 
in its walls had dried out. There is an affinity between 
garbage and ward politics that would prove fatal to econ- 
omical city ownership and operation of the crematory. 

THIS is evidently the silly season in England, and the 
metropolitan press in that country are exulting in a 
luxury that has hitherto been the custom and prerogative 
of the great New York dailies. Several of the London 
papers are exercising their ingenuity in picturing the pos- 
sibility of war with the United States, and are publishing 
reams of rot about the gospel of hate which is supposed 
to ooze from the hearts of the American people, and pro- 
ject and waste itself upon the gray-faced cliffs of the 
mother country. Columns of belligerent correspondence, 
backed up by bits of editorial endorsement, afford relief 
from the emmi of the British metropolis, and dissipate the 
idle theory that the English do not know a joke unless it is 
labeled. The jingoes in England are as far from repre- 
senting the true sentiments of that country as are the 
windy statesmen of America, and are held at precisely the 
same value. 

WITHOUT exception the gold-laden Klondyke miners 
who have reached this city within the past ten days 
express their thanks that their mining claims are on Brit- 
ish, rather than American territory. They are sure of 
fair dealing and of the absolute protection of their inter- 
ests under Canadian laws, and gladly pay the tax imposed 
for the security they get in return. It is the same in the 
application of laws in other than the wilds of remote min- 
ing districts. Butler returned from this city to Australia 
a few weeks ago, and, after a fair trial for crimes he had 
committed, was found guilty and hanged. The jail mates of 
equal guilt he left here have not yet joined him, and fatten 
in isolated security. In this country justice is frequently 
controlled by the influence regulating other mercantile 
chattels — that is, the price one can afford to pay for it. 
English justice is the same the world over. Hence the 
gratitude of the Klond>ke gold diggers and the eloquent 
testimony of the new-made grave of Butler. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 24, 1897. 



THE KLONDYKE EXCITEMENT, AND OUR MINES. 

LAST week brought to us the first suspicion that we 
were on the eve of a new gold mining excitement that 
might equal anything that had ever gone before it. The 
evidences that there had been rich finds were too palpable 
to be doubted, belittled, or explained away. The gold 
dust was here and at Seattle: two millions worth of it, in 
bright shining nuggets, and a number of the finders were 
along, whose frank, honest accounts of what had happened 
on the Klondyke, in far off Alaska, left no room to doubt 
that a new, rich, and vast mining region had been opened 
to the use of all having the pluck, the endurance, and the 
means to get there. It is a long journey and a hard one, 
to the new Eldorado at Dawson City and it is well that 
the press should inculcate lessons of caution in the minds 
of the thousands now smitten with the gold fever, but such 
lessons will in the main be thrown away. As homilies born 
of extreme conservatism, they read well, and are excellent 
in intention, but one might as well attempt to make water 
stop on a duck's back, as to expect to stay the rising tide 
so socti to break upon the banks of the Yukon. The 
spirit of '49 is now abroad in the land, and may not be 
whistled down the winds. Back East they decried the 
early hegira to these Pacific slopes, and endeavored to 
stay its progress. We now all know what the loss to the 
world would have been had they succeeded. The spirit of 
enterprise and adventure of the flower of our American 
men, now as then, will not be daunted by difficulties, no 
matter how great. They would reach the Yukon, even if 
they had to travel by burrowing under ground, as do the 
moles and the rats. As a matter of fact, the trip to Daw- 
son City to-day is a mere bagatelle compared with that 
across the plains to California in the earlier years of the 
gold fever. It is true, however, that between early 
September and the middle of May the journey to the Klon- 
dyke ought not to be attempted by either land or water. 
The routes, during that period, must be deemed to be 
closed. Nothing but loss of life and disaster could be ex- 
pected to flow from attempts to make the trip during 
those months. It is not in the power of man to breast the 
heavy snow storms, and intensely cold winds, that prevail 
in that region during at least seven months of the year. 
Once on the ground, it is not difficult to those with suffi- 
cient means to survive the winter. The people who get 
away in the next two or three steamers will be likely to 
arrive all right, but after that it would be folly to think of 
leaving until early spring approaches. By May next 
there will probably be hardly a State in the Union that 
will not have contributed its quota of hardy adventurers 
to the task of developing a region that holds out so fair a 
promise of pioving the treasure box of the continent. 

Meanwhile, there is treasure nearer home and plenty of 
of it. The people all over the land who are preparing for 
a spring start to the Klondyke could not possibly do a 
better thing than make up their minds to winter in the 
genial climate of California and acquire mining experience 
in our foothills and Sierras. In them there is gold for the 
seeking, and any good worker may earn fair wages, whilst 
many lucky ones would find enough to keep them here, 
even after the routes to the North are open. This is a 
view of the situation now upon us, that we cannot too 
strongly commend to our friends of the daily press. Let 
them, now as never, work together to turn the present 
gold mining excitement to the advantage of California. 
Fortunately there are exceptionally good mining prospects 
just now, all up and down the State. They should be in- 
quired into, the truth told, and every honest endeavor 
made to divert would-be miners in directions iu which they 
are likely to do the most good to themselves and to'our 
State. The gold fever is becoming rife everywhere. It is 
taking particularly strong hold of the youth of the East 
and of the Middle West. Let it spend itself among the 
gravel mines of California during this winter, and great 
will be the benefits to all concerned. Our transportation 
companies, both our city and country storekeepers, and 
our merchants generally, have such an immediate and 
direct interest in the view of the situation we are present- 
ing, that they ought to promptly rise to the possibilities of 
the occasion, organize to send people to the mines, supply 
them with outfits whenever necessary, and guide their 
footsteps in the directions in which they may most wisely 



go. If groups of our people, having some little means, 
would organize themselves into small stock companies, 
they could, without incurring much risk, give employment 
to all comers and make money for themselves. With the 
fact duly recognized that there are millions in our foothills 
yet, there ought to be no practical difficulties in the way 
of turning the daily rising tide of miniug excitement to ad- 
vantage. The Klondyke will be a closed book in a few 
weeks, and will remain closed for the rest of the winter. 
That will tantalize and not appease the gold fever. Some 
of us know how that was ourselves, and, knowing that, we 
would not be worthy of our experience as a people, if we 
did not see in what is taking place around us, just the op- 
portunity we have long sought to divert attention to the 
hidden storehouses of wealth that are known to abound in 
our State. 

An Attempt The law requires that the Supervisors 
To Oust shall fix the water rates to be paid by 

The Supervisors, the people of this city and county, 
during the month of February in each 
and every year. Although they began the work in Feb- 
ruary, they did not complete it until June, and thereby 
have brought upon themselves a suit, instituted by that 
well-known citizen, Geo. K. Fitch, to have them declared 
guilty of "malfeasance in office," the penalty for which is 
removal from the positions to which the people elected 
them. Whilst the law, . literally construed, may seem 
plain enough, there are certain well-known principles of 
construction to which the mere verbiage of an enactment 
must always be subordinated. The charge preferred is in 
the nature of a crime, with a penalty attached to it. That 
being so, the sound principle of law must be invoked that 
the intention is of the essence of every crime. Without an 
intent to do wrong, a mere inadvertency, or a compulsory 
neglect of a law, will not suffice to bring down degrada- 
tion and loss of public office upon any man. It would not 
be just or right that it should. In this case, the Super- 
visors began their work early iu February, having come 
into office the previous month. They proceeded with due 
diligence to accomplish their task, but for reasons entirely 
beyond their control, were unable to complete it within 
the too short period contemplated by law. No loss, or in- 
convenience, resulted to anybody in interest, and no harm 
was done the public. The rates were fixed weeks ahead 
of the time named by statute for them to go into operation. 
As good faith was obvious, and nobody injured, it would be 
monstrous to inflict a criminal penalty. Judge Wallace is a 
haterof the politicians of the period, and with much reason, 
but he is too well equipped as a Judge to permit of his making 
that a crime which is not even an offense. Mr. Fitch has 
during his long career done many things to commend him 
to this community, but, in this instance, as in some others, 
he has permitted his resentment to overlay his judgment. 
If the Supervisors have done nothing worse than yield to 
the inevitable in the matter of the date of fixing water 
rates, they are the most innocent crowd that this city has 
ever had for City Fathers. 

Doing Something For more than a month past the 
For despatches in regard to the alleged 

Silver In Europe, successes of our Silver Commissioners 
in Europe have been of a most pro- 
mising character. Just how much truth there is in all 
that we have been told, it is not easy to say in regard to 
negotiations that must necessarily in large part be secret. 
But it is safe to believe that France, in view of the large 
stock she has on hand, is more than willing to join with the 
United States in doing something for silver. Germany's 
attitude is not so certain. She unloaded much of her 
white metal on the markets of the world some years ago, 
and it was her action at that time which gave silver its 
first start on the downward grade. In view of the lower 
depths it has reached since then, she must have made 
money by the operation. But her commercial enterprises 
have developed in recent years so rapidly, and especially 
with the silver using countries, that her need for a more 
expansive currency medium must have greatly enhanced. 
That being so, it may well be that she sees a commercial 
advantage in loading up again with the white metal at the 
present low prices. It seems to be understood that she 
is feeling that way. Yet there is no doubt truth in the 



July 24, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.I-TTKR. 



report that she fears to make a move in that direction, 
whilst England gives no sign. The two nations are now 
such keen rivals in commerce winning, that the weaker of 
the two is naturally afraid to commit herself to a new de- 
parture, the consequences of which she does not fullv Bee, 
and which might be turned to her disadvantage by the 
other. Now, as before, the key of the situation is in the 
bauds of England. The world," according to Mr. load- 
stone, owes her ten billions of dollars, payable in gold. It 
is an immense sum, and the all-powerful guarantee that 
she will never depart from gold as the standard of values, 
and the money of final redemption. Yet she can do, and 
it is her interest to do. a great deal for silver, if only she 
has undoubted guarantees that other Nations will not un- 
load upon her more than her share. Silver is the time 
honored money of the 250,000,000 of her Indian people. It 
is also the subsidiary money in use throughout the entire 
British Empire. With this vast area of employment for 
the white metal, she can contract or expand its selling 
price at pleasure. Withdraw her gold circulation from 
India, and her half sovereign pieces from the rest of the 
Empire, and soon there would be use for all the silver in 
existence, and a consequent enhancement in its market- 
able value. That would, at one stroke, solve the silver 
problem, kill Bryanism in the United States, enrich our 
mining magnates, steady values, and bring to this country 
a renewed prosperity. The startling news is that Eng- 
land, on her own motion, suggests as her share in the 
work of rehabilitating silver, the doing of these very 
things. The News Letter has always maintained that 
the only way to help silver was to increase the demand for 
it. The United States could always have done that by 
withdrawing all its gold and paper money below the de- 
nomination of ten dollars. We shall have to do something 
like that now, if called upon to meet England's reported 
bid half way. If the reports given out be true, the ad- 
ministration is about to achieve that success, than which 
nothing better succeeds. 

The Good Times After just foLr years of the hardest 
Coming Again. struggles Californians have ever 
known, the indications all around us 
point to the dawn of a new and better era. Whistling to 
keep their courage up, our people and press have all along 
predicted that affairs were about to take a turn for the 
better. The wish, however, was but father to the thought. 
There was simply nothing in it. Despite all the predict- 
ing, matters went from bad to worse, and if the history of 
the period ever be written, it will have to tell of struggles, 
many and varied, on the part of men once well-to-do, to 
keep the wolf from their doors. Happily, there is no mis- 
taking the signs of the times now. They are so substan- 
tial that hope deferred no longer maketh the heart sick. 
The rift in the cloud is apparent, and the sun of coming 
prosperity is beginning to peep in through all material in- 
terests and into every man's doorway. Our harvests have 
been garnered, have been abundant, and almost every 
California product is bringing higher prices than for years 
past. Our fruits are everywhere in demand and are 
realizing to the grower from 50 to 100 per cent more than 
at this time last year. Wheat that went as low as 42 
cents, is now in brisk demand at 88 cents, with the cer- 
tainty of going higher. There is a deficiency in nearly all 
the wheat raising countries, and when California has 
parted with her immense surplus, the cry will still be for 
more. Those of our farmers who can afford to hold, will 
hold, and gain thereby. The rise in the values of agricul- 
tural and horticultural products would alone bring back 
good times to California. 

Just at this time, when every prospect pleases, there 
comes news of gold discoveries which promise to equal and 
even surpass anything the world has ever seen. Ten days 
ago none of us dreamed of the sights we were so soon to 
behold. The coming of the gold tells of the mines whence 
it comes. There is no getting around that fact, and, 
preach caution as we may, the rush to the far off Klondyke 
shows that the spirit of '49 has revived and that the vast 
area of the Yukon Country is about to be made to yield up 
its incalculable riches. That the gold is there in unsur- 
passed quantities we now know. The few hardy pioneers 
who got in there last spring have been heard from and 
their first message is a veritably golden one. Over two 



tons of the precious metal came to hand within three days, 
and the lucky Bnders came along bearing from $10,01111' to 
1175,000 each. 14,000,000 more are known to be stored up 
:it St. Michael's Island at the Mouth of the Yukon. The 
gold is coarse and nuggetty, indicating that there is much 
more where it came from. The ensuing spring will wit- 
ness a condition of things in and around Dawson City that 
h;is not been paralleled in the history of gold discoveries. 
Whilst all this is true, it is a further fact that right here 
at home in genial California, new discoveries of value are 
being reported almost daily. Oneday it is Trinity County, 
the next it is Shasta, and so on along the whole line. It 
is becoming clearer every day that so far we have only 
scratched for gold in California, and that the era of real 
mining is only now about to set in. With these excite- 
ments upon us, our people heave a sigh of relief, thankful 
that the evil days are fast passing away, and that the 
better ones are rapidly crowding in upon them. 

Is The Grand The unspeakable Turk is at this moment 
Turk As Bold in the strange attitude of defying all 
As He Seems t Europe. On what meats has this lean 
and hungry fellow fed that he has grown 
so bold? He was universally credited with being the "sick 
man," ready to be turned out of Europe, "bag and bag- 
gage," at any moment. The European Concert, and the 
Czar of Russia in particular, have served notice upon him 
that he must withdraw behind the frontier line marked 
out for him in Thessaly. He does not withdraw worth a 
cent, but stolidly stays where he is. He knew in advance 
that he was to take no .territorial advantage by his war 
with Greece, because the powers notified him that they 
would maintain the statu quo as to territory at all hazards. 
He went to war with that notification ringing in his ears, 
and must have expected to conform to it. What has 
happened since to make him so defiant? He has performed 
the easy task of defeating the unorganized Greeks, but 
that is not an achievement to warrant a defiance of all the 
great Military and Naval powers. There are probably 
two reasons for his present course. In the first place, the 
past shilly-shallying of the Concert has been such that he 
may well doubt its intention and capacity to unite for the 
purpose of coercing him by actual warfare. He is not 
quite a safe man to coerce, but only because of the posi- 
tion he occupies on the map of the world, and towards the 
rivalries and jealousies cf Europe. He knows the desires 
and ambitions of each and all, and how to play one off 
against another. His ownership and occupancy of those 
narrow straits whiehkeep Russia out of the Mediterranean, 
is his one great advantage. Neither England, Prance, 
nor Italy can afford to let those straits pass into the hands 
of Russia. On the other hand, if Russia could acquire the 
Dardannelles, she could and doubtless would find a way to 
let the Turk annex all Greece. That is the difficulty. 
Then again, the Mahommeian soldiery, upon whom the 
Turk must lean for support, are flushed with victory and 
wild to overrun Greece and deluge it in blood. Does he 
know his followers well enough to fear that he cannot 
afford to thwart their desire for atrocities like unto those 
of Armenia? It looks like it. We suspect, however, that 
he is playing with fate just a little too long. It is incon- 
ceivable that the powers will fail to mean what they say 
this time. 

Annexation a The annexation of Hawaii is not to take 
Future place just yet. In fact, it has been post- 

Consideration, poned to a more convenient season. It 
had to be promised in order to secure the 
Sugar Trust's votes and to pass the tariff, but those ends 
accomplished, it has been laid over until the next session 
of Congress, and that means that an opportunity is to be 
given the country to bring to bear upon it its sober second 
thought. We do not believe it will survive any such pro- 
cess. To think otherwise is to believe that clear thought 
and cool judgment will not survive as the fittest. There 
is no tangible benefit in annexation that the logical mind 
can grasp. Grope for any material advantage there is in 
it, 'and it is not there. It eludes you as doth a will-o'-the- 
wisp. If you say we need a harbor of refuge to serve as 
a coaling station out in the mid-Pacific, we have got it 
already. If you say we want the trade of Hawaii, the 
answer is that we take all of her exports and send her 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 24, 1897. 



nine- tenths of her imports now, and that by reason of her 
geographical position we should always do the same thing. 
Japan is not a competitor for her trade, because Japan 
produces little that she buys. Nearly all her require- 
ments are best met from this Coast, and here, with or 
without reciprocity or annexation, she will ever continue 
to sell her sugar. What more of substantial advantage is 
there to connect us with Hawaii or Hawaii with us ? We 
venture the assertion that not all the force of the jingo 
press can conjure up anything further. Of course it is 
possible to make the old and exploded humbug do service 
that if we do not take the islands, England or Japan will. 
Bah ! That is the old yarn of the planters that has been 
trotted out on occasion for over twenty years past, only 
to be exploded as often as heard. Both those countries 
are on record in the most contemptuous terms toward 
those leprous little islands, dec'aring that they would not 
take them as "a free gift," or touch them with a forty foot 
pole. They have long been accepted by the nations as 
within the sphere of the activity of the United States, and 
that is enough in itself to keep other "hands off." It is 
the purest balderdash to say that Japan or any other 
power would go to war with this great country over the 
possession of mere specks on the ocean, without strategic 
or other importance, and occupied by cODlies, leprosy, and 
a few tainted whites, mostly ingrates of early missionary 
descent. To make a State of our glorious Union out of 
such elements, as must occur sooner or later from annexa- 
tion, is enough to make good old Uncle Sam bow his head 
in shame and confusion, and betake himself from the sight 
of his children forever. Happily, their sober second 
thought has yet to be heard from. 

The Death of In the death of Charles F. Crocker, 

Charles F. Crocker, which occurred at his country home 
in San Mateo County, last Saturday, 
this State loses one of its familiar and foremost citizens. 
A native son, born in Sacramento in 1854, Mr. Crocker's 
whole life was practically spent in this State, nrst in the 
employ, and latterly in the direction, of the Southern 
Pacific Railroad Company, in whose organization and con- 
struction his father was one of the original promoters, 
and with which his name is inseparably connected. 

Charles F. Crocker was a man of broad and liberal 
views. He was in no sense a money-grubber; and, while 
the vast interests under his immediate supervision re- 
ceived his untiring and constant attention, he gave much 
consideration to the subject of astronomy, and was a dis- 
criminating patron of art. His gifts to the Lick Observa- 
tory were valued, and, from his private purse, he sent as- 
tronomers abroad to make observations of importance to 
the world of science. 

Colonel Crocker was a man of simple and unostentatious 
life, easy of approach, kind, and considerate of others. He 
was a worthy son of California, and took an active inter- 
est in the advancement and development of the State from 
a broad and comprehensive standpoint. 

The fatal illness of Colonel Crocker was wholly unex- 
pected, except to his most intimate friends and relatives, 
although he had been warned of the approach of death by 
his family physician some time ago. To the community at 
large the stroke preceding his demise came as a shock, 
and its termination was received with deep and general sor 
row. His death was a distinct loss to this State, and his 
memory will be long-cherished and honored by the people 
of California. 

Our South The NEWS Letter has always favored well- 
American considered reciprocity treaties with the 
Policy. Soutli American republics, and everything 
else calculated to promote closer commercial 
relations between them and us. Such relations almost 
necessarily and naturally follow the firm establishment of 
the Monioe doctrine. We can never have those close and 
intimate relations with our neighbors that are essential to 
the line of policy we have laid down for ourselves whilst 
they sell nearly all their surplus products and buy all they 
need from Europe. As we have bound ourselves to pro- 
tect all Central and South America from European aggres- 
sion, it needs follow that wc should have some real and 
tangible interest in their welfare. Mere abstractions, 
with no personal benefits in them, never have .sufficed to 



weld nations together, and, whilst human nature is what 
it is, they never will. But let us build up reciprocal and 
mutual advantages and forthwith a common interest springs 
into existence, and a mutual desire to guard those in- 
terests against danger naturally follows. That is the way, 
and the only way, in which to permanently safeguard the 
Monroe doctrine. Yet under the new tariff we are about 
to kill off what little material interest we have so far ac- 
quired in the republics named. At the grand banquet 
given in Philadelphia the other day to the visiting Pan- 
Americans, the representative of Argentina said : " We 
have been exporting to your country our hides during 
twenty-five years past free of duty, but now that we have 
come to talk reciprocity, we find ourselves treated in an 
unfriendly manner by your taxing our hides one and one- 
half cents a pound. You may consider how much this 
tax will affect our tride when you reflect that we have 
over 22,000,000 of oxen. You cannot suppose that whilst 
you drive us to sell our products in Europe we can come 
here to borrow capital and make our purchases." If there 
be any answer to that we confess our inability to see what 
it can be. We have had commissions to South America in 
the interests of trade, and they have reported that with 
due attention to the peculiarities of Southern markets, and 
with certain reciprocal tariff arrangements, we can ac- 
quire and hold a very much enlarged interest in that part 
of our continent. Yet Congress after Congress go on for- 
getting those reports, and even failing to remember that 
there is such a place as South America. 

The Hebbard At the instance of the Prosecuting Attor- 
Libei Suits, ney the remaining case against Frederick 
Marriott, proprietor of the News Letter, 
charged with having libeled him by the publication of cer- 
tain matter in connection with the People's Home Savings 
bank previous to last election, was on last Monday stricken 
from the calendar. At the same time cases against the 
seven depositors who were charged by the Judge with hav- 
ing lilieled him by the publication of a circular addressed 
to the voters, were dismissed by Judge Daingerfield. Thus 
ends an important chapter in the litigation growing out of 
the unfortunate People's Home Savings bank failure, and 
it maybe added, an equally disastrous chapter in the pub- 
lic career of Judge Hebbard. After his crushing defeat 
and the very complete vindication of the NEWS Letter for 
the course it had taken in criticising the judicial acts of 
the Judge, there was no possible hope of obtaining a sub- 
sequent verdict either against the depositors in that bank 
or Mr. Marriott. Had Judge Hebbard taken the advice 
of his friends the suits would never have been brought. 
However, the Judge is a comparatively young man, and 
there is hope for him. He has shown that he knows when 
he has had enough; and he may gain consolation in the 
thought that his contact with the News Letter will be 
of value as an awful example of judicial interference with 
the freedom of the press of the country. 

Reform Schools. The trial of an officer of the Whittier 
Reform School, at Los Angeles, for hav- 
ing chastised one of the inmates, again bring that insti- 
tution before the public. As at present conducted, the 
reform schools of California annually cost a large sum, 
and, at the same time, are really training schools for 
ultimate graduation in the penitentiaries. No care is 
taken in ascertaining the qualification for admission; all 
grades of crime are treated alike; and, from the uncon- 
tradicted reports, the lack of discipline that so largely 
contributes to the waywardness of children, is the rule 
in these institutions. Our courts make criminal blun- 
ders through lack of judgment, combined with a disre- 
gard of the welfare of erring youth, that is monstrous. 
Hundreds of children are ordered to the reform schools who 
should never be sent there. The punishment frequently 
bears no relation to the offense. The hardened and vicious 
are associated with the merely wayward, and the contact 
in a short time obliterates all difference, stamps out hope, 
and starts the inmates well on the way to a life of sin. 
The thought of reformation is destroyed, and the boy who 
may enter with possibilities of an honorable life in his 
heart, is discharged hopelessly bad. We make laws for 
punishment of crime, and over against them place other 
statutes which make the criminal. 



July 24, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE MISSION PARK AND ZOO. 

IN taking steps for the purchase of grounds suitable for 
a park and zoological garden in the Mission, the Super- 
- are responding to a clearly-defli ed Bnd emphati- 
cally-expressed public Bentiqpent; for all thai great area 
South of Market street is at present without b breathing 
place worthy of the name. In making theirchoUe for this 
city pleasure ground the Supervisors will bear in mind the 
four most important considerations, which are : 

Location, configuration, area, and cost. 

The park and zoological garden should he in ihe Mission 
— that is. within easy reach and cheaply accessible, so 
that the people for whom they are to be bought and main- 
tained may enjoy them without inconvenience and at small 
cost. They must lie in the city, right at the door. 

They must be topographically available, so that they 
can be easily improved aDd cultivated, and kept up with 
reasonable economy. 

They must be large enough, not only for present wants, 
but for all future requirements. San Francisco will grow, 
and it would be a waste of money to buy a small strip of 
land, make costly improvements upon it, only to find that 
its legitimate requirements had far outgrown all pos- 
sible enlargement. 

The purchase made by the Supervisors must be reason- 
able. The price must not be an inflated or exaggerated 
ODe. The people's money will pay for the Mission park 
and zoo, and they have every right to insist that they ob- 
tain collectively as good a bargain as they would expect if 
it were an individual investment. 

These conditions met fairly and squarely, there should 
be no difficulty in making the purchase wisely and profit- 
ably. 

The Supervisors last week, in accordance with the very 
general wish of the people, called for proposals for the 
grounds necessary for park and zoo. They received seven 
separate bids, running all the way from 13 to 330 acres at 
prices ranging from $45,000 to $72,600. Among the 
bids submitted, that of Baldwin & Howell appears to meet 
the requirements of cost, area, topography and location — 
all of which, as has been shown, are absolutely necessary 
to the creation of a zoological garden and a park in the 
Mission. Their bid was as follows: Five tracts — 99.94 
acres, $275,000: 8.30 acres, $20,000; 24.80 acres, $50,000; 
6.03 acres, $17,500; 5 acres, $25,000— a total area of 144.13 
acres, and costing $387,500. 

This property extends from Stanford Heights to the 
Fairmount Tract, and from Thirtieth street to Sunny 
Side. 

The six remaining bids, and the agents and owners 
making them are: 

By N. Schlesinger— The two blocks of land (13.37 acres) bounded 
by Eighteenth, Twentieth, Dolores and Church streets. Price, 
$300,000. 

By Charles W. Pope— 330 acres of the San Miguel Rancho, bounded 
by Corbett road and Balboa boulevard, Sunnyside and Hamburg 
avenues Price, $726,000. 

By Bovee, Toy &Sonntag— 55. 11 acres fronting on Silver and Cres- 
cent avenues, near Mission street. Price. $175 000. 

By Crocker Estate Company— 93.50 acres on the San Mateo County 
dividing line and fronting on Amazon avenue. Price, $235,000. 

By A T. Green & Co.— 66 acres fronting on Mission street, between 
Channel street and Crescent avenue. Price, $260,000 

By the Bay View Land Company— 95 acres known as the Bay 
View Tract, bounded by Railroad avenue and the Paul Tract on the 
east, by the Wheeler Tract on the south, by Third avenue souih ; on 
the norlh and on the west by San Francisco Bay. Price, $45 000. 

Inasmuch as the people who foot the bills appreciate the 
necessity and wisdom of acquiring a park and zoological 
garden in the Mission the Board of Supervisors should 
make provision in their next levy for the purchase of the 
lands required. 

THE Belvedere Land Company should learn that, to 
enjoy the confidence of the community in which it 
does business, it should adhere to all its contracts. 

The Press Clipping bureau, 510 Montgomery street, S. P. reads all 
papers oa the Pacific Coast, and supplies clippings on all topics .business 
and personal. 

Pine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. Cooper & Co., 746 
Market street. San Pranolsco. 



Jackson's Napa Soda leaves a good taste in the mouth. 



WHERE MEN ARE CHASTE. 

TH KRE is no foundling hospital in all Greece, because 
there are no foundlings. Men are expected to be 
chaste, and are so. A Frenchman just come back from a 
tour in that country, says London Truth, was astonished 
at the sobriety and chastity of a population so greatly 
maritime. Herein lies thesecretof the growth of Greece. 
The only intoxicants were pure air, clear water, which 
was drunk as though it was nectar, and animated conver- 
sations in cafes and on the roadside. Education was uni- 
versal; and a high-class education, too. Peasants' sons 
can now read Homer and the other classic Greek litera- 
ture. 

There was the strongest family affection. Husbands re- 
mained attached to their faded wives. Such fidelity our 
Freuch friend did not think possible until be went on his 
Greek tour. He explains it thus: The Greek for centuries 
showed his contempt for the polygamous Turk in being 
strictly the husband of one wife. Islam appeared to him 
a sink of sensuality. This was another reason for subject- 
ing the body to the rigorous discipline of the Greek Church. 
The Russians have the same long and severe fasts and noc- 
turnal piayers, but are much too fond of vodki. 

A clear, warm climate doubtless helps to make the 
Greeks the most sober people in Europe. They are also 
fortunate in having no newly-rich, no aristocrats, no beg- 
gars. One sees in Greece only shepherds, tillers of the 
ground, artisans; sailors, traders, and professional men. 
The traders who stay at home are few. Two-thirds of the 
population make their living out of the sea. 



DEATH OF J. J. O'BRIEN. 

THE funeral of the late J. J. O'Brien, the well-known 
merchant of this city, whose unfortunate and most 
unexpected death from heart failure, while hunting near 
Highland Springs on last Thursday week, and of which 
brief men1ion-was made last Saturday, took place on 
Tuesday, the 19th inst., at St. Mary's Cathedral. The 
long and busy life and labors of J. J. O'Brien in San Fran- 
cisco made the deceased merchant a public character; and 
he was universally respected for bis personal and social 
traits, and his broad practical charities, as well as for his 
upright and honorable business career in this community. 
Mr. O'Brien was identified with many financial and other 
institutions, and occupied a position of weight and influ- 
ence in San Francisco. The immense mercantile business 
of which J. J. O'Brien was the head, and which stands as 
a monument of his energy and ability, will continue to hold 
the prominent position in the commercial world that he 
made for it. His brother, James O'Brien, who has for 
years been intimately associated with him in the direction 
of the company's affairs, will succeed to its general man- 
agement. The death of J. J. O'Brien, in the prime of life, 
is a direct loss to this community, and he will be long re- 
membered in the business and social life of this city. The 
funeral was largely attended, the services being conducted 
by Father Prendergast, and the remains were followed by 
a long train of sorrowing friends to their final resting 
place in Calvary Cemetery. 



Mothers, besure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup" tor your 
ohildren while teething . 



See Rome and die: drink Jackson's Napa Soda and live. 




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BRUSHES 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, bil- 
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stable men, tar-roofers, tanners tailors, etc. 

BUCHANAN BROS., 

BRUSH MANUFACTURERS, 609 Sacramento St. ,S. F Tel. 5610. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 24, 1897. 





MWW 



'We obey no wand but pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



V 



V HE Frawleys are giving a respect- 
able performance of a difficult play. 
The successful acting of "atmospheric" 
pieces is so largely a question of time and 
stage management — neither of which is 
considerable in the Frawley season — that 
this adventure into Pudd'nhead Wilton is not to be slighted 
by iron-clad comparisons with Frank Mayo's production 
Nor is it fair to expect of the Frawleys that in one week 
they grasp a unique character play with anything like the 
facility they have shown in pretty, modern comedy. After 
all, the play's the thing, and it is something to see this 
lovable play — perhaps the best type we have of Americau 
bumor of the local, un-Britished sort — for the second time 
and retain the first enthusiasm for the author and adapter. 
Miss Moretti was a foregone success. In the original pro- 
duction she made Roxy, and Roxy returned the compli- 
ment. I have never seen a melodramatic part played 
with better distinction and flame. It is the very art of 
exaggeration. It becomes a personal matter between you 
and her; she burns into your sensibilities. Mr. Hamil- 
ton's Pudd'nhead is reliable character acting — that is 
all. It has many satisfying moments, but not the iden- 
tity Mayo gave it, nor the tenderness, nor the humor. 
Mr. Hamilton makes little of the "calendar" epigrams, 
and he fails to bring out the beautiful, unobtrusive pathos 
in that scene where Pudd'nhead loses faith in his treas- 
ured thumb marks; and, in the trial scene, he com- 
mences his speech, not with the halting, absurd timid 
ity of the man who had waited twenty-three years for the 
opportunity, but with the ready eloquence of the ready 
actor who knows a good speech when he sees it. I would 
not decry originality and personality in the actor who 
assumes the role made famous by another. Mr. Hamil- 
ton's obviously weak points in Pudd'nhead are not due, how- 
ever, to original conception, but rather to conception and 
execution such as any actor might at first reading 
apply to the part. Now Mr. Enos might have departed 
from tradition with brilliant effect : Tom Driscoll was 
the only bad spot in the cast last year. Mr. Enos 
brings him several paces nearer to homo as he is 
lived, but Tom's manners are still so notorious that the 
element of surprise is precluded from even his dirtiest deeds. 
Mr. Colville has done nothing so free and gentle this season 
as his York Driscoll; and Mr. Clark brings real character 
out of the sheriff. Mr. Ross needs just a touch more of 
humility in his Chambers— that humility is one of the tragic 
issues of the play, it is one of Twain's arguments on the 
futility of mere birth. Tom, on the other hand, attests the 
futility of mere breeding. Phosa McAllister— a valuable 
woman, Phosa McAllister Duffield !— plays sister Patsy 
as she should have been played while Frank Mayo was 
alive: with a sweeter sympathy underlying her fussiness. 
M1ss Cook does a good bit of unobtrusive negro character 
work with Hannah. Rowy is very much like Miss Gladys 
Wallis, very dear and dangerous. Praise for the twins, 
the court, the gentlemen of the jury, and the counsel for 
the prosecution is withheld on account of their over work 
and mine. Asiiton Stevens. 

At the Alcazar is a good specimen of the old type of 
melo-romance, Lester Wallack's Rosedale. The play has 
seen many years of popularity, and many big actors have 
played Elliott Gray, which even to-day it is a favorite role 
of Joseph Haworth's. The present production is on a line 
with the best work of the Alcazar stock company with pieces 
of this character. Mr. Francis Carlyle, the new leading 
man, takes Elliott Gray from the old standpoint of hero- 
worship, and plays him with elaborate valor and poise. It 
is just as well, perhaps, not to get too close to humanity 
in this sort of part, and Mr. Carlyle's work, of its kind, is 
strong and sure. Mr. Osbourne has no scruples about 
emphasizing only the l>est that is in Miles McKenna, and 
Mha Johnson as Rosa is considerably above her last week's 
record. 



At the Orpheum there are three new bills, as many old, 
and Lew Dockstader now closing his fifth week with the 
freshness of a debutante. The new people are Francis J. 
Bryant, an Irish monologuist, who is reasonably funny; 
Ouda, a young woman who does a dizzy turn up near the 
rafters; and Perry and Burns,.whoare the dead duplicates 
of the irrepressible Gilbert and Goldie. Next week the 
Orpheum will have no less than four new turns, headed by 
La Loie's rival, Papinta, the skirk and mirror dancer. 
The others are: Crawford and Manning, "the Colored 
Congressmen;" the Deonzos, barrel riders; and the 
McKees, unusual comedians. 

* * * 

The Stevens season is breaking all records at the Tivoli. 
Never has operatic comedy been so splendidly given. The 
Isle of c 'hampagne is crowding the house to the door mat. 
It is well to laugh while we may — in a few weeks the 
Hinrichs season beginning with the heaviest repertory 
ever booked at the Tivoli. 

# * # 

The Alcazar players will try Gloriana next week, a 
comedy of established reputation, together with a Gus 
Thomas curtain-raiser. The little piece is called Reclaimed, 
and was, it is said, written for Mr. Carlyle, who plays the 
part of the modern prodigal. The new soubrette of the 
company, Miss Bengie Harrison, will appear as Kitty ic 

Gloriana, 

# * * 

Rumors from far across the bay say that Ulrich's Chin- 
ese melodrama, The Celestial Maiden, although badly 
mangled by amateurs, is still alive and prosperous at the 
Oakland Theatre. It is liable to be imported here at any 

moment. 

# * # 

Francis Powers's new play, which is to be introduced at 
the Alcazar next month, has been entitled When Turk 
Metis Greek. 

Pudd'nhead Wilson is drawing so well at the Columbia 
that the management has concluded to run it another 
week. 

A California girl, Miss Lillian K. Slinkey, will make her 
operatic dSbut in Milan next week. She has been studying 
under Levin for two years. 

A week from Monday night the Baldwin re-opens with 
John Drew in Rosemarxj. 

PRESIDENT TAYLOR'S DAUGHTER. 



THREE former mistresses of the White House are now 
in Washington — Mrs. Grant, Mrs. Harriet Lane 
Johnston and Mrs. Danbridge, daughter of President 
Taylor, says the N. Y. Tribune. Mrs. Grant and Mrs. 
Johnston are settled in permanent homes of their own, 
and Mrs. Danbridge is the guest of Mrs. Barnes, widow of 
Surgeon-General Barnes. It lacks but a year of half a 
century since General Taylor, "Old Rough and Ready," 
the hero of the Mexican war, became President. Mrs. Tay- 
lor was an invalid, and their only daughter, the "beautiful 
Betty Bliss," presided as mistress of the White House. 
She was a bride of 20, having been married shortly before 
to Major Bliss, a young officer on her father's staff, and 
who became President Taylor's private secretary. Many 
old residents of Washington still remember her as the 
graceful young hostess who brought sunshine and happi- 
ness into the mansion for the few months of her father's 
life there. Mrs. Danbridge, now a white-haired woman of 
70, has had an eventful life. As a bright and vivacious 
girl she was the belle of the military post where her father 
was stationed. She entered the White House a bride, and 
on her father's sudden death, four months after his inau- 
guration, retired to private life with her husband and 
mother. Mrs. Taylor died two years afterward, and a 
year later Major Bliss died. After years of seclusion 
she married Mr. Danbridge, a grand-nephew of Martha 
Washington. But to her countrymen and country women 
Mrs. Danbridge will always be known as the "beautiful 
Betty Bliss." 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda before breakfast. 



The Granular Effervescent Salts that cures headaches is Bromo Kola. 



July 24. 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



w 



AFTER THE FOURTH OF JULY. -« miirs oawsos. m cood totos 

i; put htm to bed in bis little nightgown. 
Tbe most battered youngster there was in town ; 
Yet he said as he opened his only well eye, 
" Hah. rah. (or the jolly old Fourth ol July •" 

Two thumbs and eight fingers with lint were tied up. 
On bis bead was a bump like an upside-down cup. 
And his smile was distorted, and his nose all awry. 
From the glorious Fourth o( July. 
We were glad ; he had started abroad with the sun, 
And all day had lived in the powder and fun ; 
While the boom of the cannon roared up to the sky. 
To salute Young America's Fourth of July ! 

I said we were glad all the pieces were there, 
As we plastered and bound thetu with tenderest care. 
But out of the wreck came the words, with a sigh, 
" If to-morrow was only the Fourth of July I" 

He will grow altogether again, never fear. 
And be ready to celebrate freedom next year ; 
Meanwhile all his friends are most t hankful there lies, 
A crackerles? twelvemonth 'twist Fourth of Julys. 

We kissed him good-night on his powder-specked face, 
We laid his bruised hauds softly down in their place, 
And he murmured, as sleep closed his one open eye, 
" I wish every day was the Fourth of July!" 

AN IMPORTANT PRECEDENT. 

CLARA M. Foltz recently won an important suit in the 
Sixth District Court against the New York Herald. 
Miss Belle A. Whitney submitted manuscript to the Herald, 
and after repeated inquir}' and many delays was informed 
that the matter had been accepted, was in type, and 
would be published. Unable to get beyond this unsatis- 
factory stage, Miss Whitney finally placed tbe matter in 
the hands of Mrs. Foltz, who brought suit for her client. 
Her contention was based on the well-known principle that 
labor performed and accepted must be paid for. The de- 
fendant appeared in court upon the day set for trial, and 
admitted all the facts by paying the bill and costs of court. 
Mrs. Foltz has gained much praise for the vigorous and 
successful assault on the too-common practice of many 
newspapers of delaying payment for work that has been 
accepted. This case is important, as establishing a prece- 
dent which may be appealed to in the settlement of similar 
cases in future. 

THE Bulletin has always been recognized as an able 
and reliable paper, and its opinions have carried 
.weight and strength; but since its purchase by Mr. 
"Crothers, the present owner, it has taken a place in the 
field never occupied by it before. Improvement has fol- 
lowed improvement until one feels like employing italics in 
saying that it is a news paper. The Bulletin gives the 
news, and all of it, in an up-to-date, breezy, and enter- 
taining manner. As an evening paper it stands shoulder 
to shoulder with the very first publications in the United 
States. Its telegraphic news is particularly complete, and 
it places before its readers the events of the world the day 
they transpire. The people take the Bulletin, for it gives 
them the news, and because it can be relied upon. 

THE season at Vichy Springs is at its height, and never 
has that popular resort been so crowded with visitors 
as now. The advantages of the champagne baths, the 
Vichy water, and the elegant accommodations, form a 
combination of attractions that cannot be beaten. The 
Springs is under the direct management of Miss D. D. Allen, 
and every attention that experience can suggest is enjoyed 
by her guests. 

THE Saturday evening entertainments at Blythedale 
are becoming quite a feature at that most romantic 
summer resort, and the Thursday evening euchre parties 
are developing some fine amateur talent. Blythedale is 
the picturesque spot in Marin County, and its hotel and 
cozy cottages are restful and convenient. A trip to Blythe- 
dale is worth the time and trifling cost, and a summer so- 
journ there constitutes an ideal outing. 

Shirt Waist Buttons, Silver Links, ana other novelties in sterlln 
silver at J. N. Brittaln's, watohmaker and Jeweler, 20 Geary street. 

When playing poker drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



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<£enox 

and . . . 

Svory Soap 



HE JOHNSON-LOCKE Will exchange tor Lenox and 

hacdoamtii c r*r\ Ivory Soap Wrappers Free 

IVI LKOAIN I ILL UO ., Tioketsto the Orpheum, un- 

der the following conditions : 
No. 201 FRONT ST., S. F. 

Send 25 Wrappers ot Lenox Soap ■, ,,-,„ UIant 

Or 12 Wrappers of Ivory Soap " UUU Wdlll 

Or else send 15 Wrappers ot Lenox „r r Rpcerired <leat 

And 6 Wrappers of Ivory Soap 3 ZaG. IvBStirVBa 9601 

Send 50 Wrappers of Lenox Soap . f n ..,.»„+ 

Or 24 Wiappers of Ivory Soap " yOU Wdlll 

Orelsesend 2^ Wrappers of Lenox a Gnr Receruerl Seat 

And 12 Wrappers of Ivory Soap d OUli. nti&ol VBu OCdl 

rr*i , I « r\ i_i Mrs. Ernestine Kreling, 

I IVOll UPera llOUSe. Proprietor and Manager 



The Edwin Stevens comic opera season, 
sparkling comedy opera, 



Last times of the 



THE ISLE OF CHAMPAGNE. 

Edwin Stevens as King Mumm the Second ; catchy music, great 

oast, grand ballets, superb scenery, beautiful costumes, and 

effects 

Monday, August 9, 1897— Opening GRAND OPERA SEASON. 

A gala event. 

Popular Prices 25o and50o 

G| 1 ' TL J. The" Gem" Theatre of the Coast. 

O I U mD I a I Heat re • Friedlander, Gottlob & Co., Lessees 
and Managers. 
Monday, July 26th. Second and last week of Mark Tw.ain's 
quaint story, 

PUDD'NHEAD WILSON. 

The greatest success achieved by THE FRAWLEY COMPANY 
Monday, August 2d— "The Case of Rebellious Susan " 

r\ I TL J. Belasoo & La Faille, Lessees and Man- 

rAlCaZar I heaure. agers; Mark Than, Director. 

Monday, July 26th, the Paris, London, and New York success, 

GLORIANA, 

A joyful comedy in two acts, preceded by Mr. Francis Car- 
lyle in Clay M. Greene's emotional sketch, RECLAIMED. 
Monday, August 2nd— Francis Powers's new Oriental play, 
WHEN TURK MEETS GREEK. 



Orph 



eurrv 



San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farrell 
street, between Stookton and Powell streets. 



Monday evening, July 26th. Seven new vaudeville lights. The 
only 

PAPINTA, 

'■Myriad Dancer," "The Colored Congressmen Elect," John 
Crawford & William Manning; the Deonzos, trick barrel jump- 
ers; the McKees, eccentric ccmedy duo; in conjunction with 
Ida Grey Scott, Francis J. Bryant, and Ouda. Last week of 
Imogene Comer and Harry Le Clair 

Reserved seats, 25c' ; balcony 10c ; opera chairs and box seats 60c. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. Matinee Prices : 
Parquet, any seat, 25o.; balcony, any seat, 10c; children, lOo-i 
^any part . 



Gomel Oolong. 



The oldest and most reliable brand on the 
market. Sold only in 1-3 pound papers at 
20 cents per paper. All grocers keep it. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




July 24, 1897. 



1 deredat that so many 
desirable matches remain bachelors," said a man thp other 
day on the ferryboat while returning from a visit to Sausa- 
lito. "When one sees the absolute comfort in which Claude 
Terry Hamilton lives, and the freedom from annoyance of 
family responsibilities, one can't help saying a man's a fool 
to tie himself up in matrimony." " Hold on, my friend," 
said a well-known clubman, "before you go so far. Re- 
member it is not every fellow who is so happily constituted 
as to be independent of home ties. Most men like a home 
where a good, true wife presides — one whom you know 
makes you and your happiness her first and chief thought. 
The tender grace, the loving care, the sweet companion- 
ship of a good wife are all lost to the bachelor, no matter 
how cozy he makes his nest. No matter how many good 
fellows he is surrounded by there is something lacking, 
and believe me, no one realizes this more than Hamilton 
himself. The only difficulty is in finding the right woman 
to bring all this into your home and life. In the majority 
of our wealthy bachelor cases there is a dread of being 
taken as 'good matches,' or dernier retsort. Young 
girls are not fitted to fill the position for an old bachelor : 
there is where the trouble lies. " 

* # # 

San Rafael is credited with being the jolhest place in all 
the list of Fashion's outing resorts. Paper chases and 
dances, tennis and bowling, riding, driving, card playing. 
and loafing fill in the hours most agreeably. A trip to the 
Tavern on the top of Mt. Tamalpais lias become one of the 
regular things to do, and excursion parties are formed 
daily for it. Society people stopping at the Hotel Rafael 
make trips over to Sausalito constantly, and receive re- 
turn visits from there. This has been greatly enjoyed 
during the moonlight. 

* # * 

This long-suffering community is hoping that the Exami- 
ner, having followed the footsteps of the Bradbury couple 
until they wept in each other's arms, may now turn its at- 
tention to something more wholesome. Query: Can a 
leopard change its spots ? 

* * # 

There seems to be an unlucky cloud overhanging Up- 
lands in San Mateo County. First, its original owner had 
scarcely completed and inhabited it when reverse of for- 
tune necessitated its sale. Now the purchaser has found 
death within its walls. 

* * * 

Barons seem to be as thick as blackberries, and like 
everything which loses quality by quantity, people do 
not take much stock in them any more. Even Alice 
Younger's Anglo-Austrian baron has lost caste with the 
society scribes. 

* # * 

Some girl suggested at Sausalito lately that a party 
should be made up to visit Durrant in prison ' What next 
from the fin rf< tiecle maiden ? 

* # * 

Hereafter, when a woman breaks the Seventh Com- 
mandment she may plead excess of "emotional feeling. ' 



^ GRAND concert will be given next Wednesday eve- 
ning, the L'Kth inst.. a' fornia theatre, in aid 

of the Chronicle's Fresh Air Fund. The object is a most 
worthy one and the concert, which will ho of a high order, 
should be largely attended. There will be some two hun- 
dred participants in the concert, which promises to be an 
artistic and substantial success. 



Purb Cosuktics— Professor Weozcll, the Pure Pood Chemist, says of 
Mme. Marctaands Preparations Use Creme dc la Creme. Positively pro- 
vents sunburn and poison oak. Price, Mots. 107 Geary si > 

For a nni.|ue weilrling gift, gee the .-sterling Silver Egg Set at Na- 
than, liohrmann £ Co.'s, 



^»^^^<*S^-^^»<><><*S«<»»K 



\ 9/. firace, 



8020.3922 Sixteenth St 
Branch— 2:04 Mission 
Tel. Mission 161 



jrfouse and utyn ^Painting 



<*s 



^ Whitening and Papei Hanging, % 
% Dealer in wall paper, etc. 



ffiellingham fflay 

Improvement 

Company, 



Mills at New Whatcom, on 
Heilinguam Bay, Puget Sound, 
Washington 



Jobbing and Retail 
Lumberyard: 

Sansonie and Chestnut 
Streets, San Francisco 



Douglas Fir (Oregon Pine). Spruce and other Pacific 
Coast Lumber; Laths, Ship Stock, Pickets, Shingles, etc Unsurpassed 
quality, any quantity, lowest prices, prompt delivery, liberal treatment. 

Full information at 22 MARKET ST. 



DO YOT EAT EGGS? 



THE 



Perfect Eqq Guttina Guide. 



Eftt th-m from the shell. 
They are best that way 

Directs the blow so that a common table knife makes an opening the 
right size and always alike. Price by mail 25 cents Address 

Inventors Specialty. Go., Rochester, N. Y. 

•^-Descriptive circulars sent free telling the best way to cook and how 
t) eat egt;s. 

A Preparatory school for the University, Law, and 



I 116 LlJCC lini Medical College; 



Candidates are thoroughly prepared in all stibj'-eis for tti-' entrance ex- 
aminations of Harvard or Yale, as well as for Stanford, the University of 
Calif mi >. and the affiliated colleges References, President Jordan or 
any Sta ford professor. The school is aceredited with atauford Univer- 
sity and Cooper Medical Co) 

PHKLAN BUILDING, Corner O'Fartcll and Market Sts. 

HILLS' COLLEGE AND SEMINARY 

REOPENS AUGUST 5th Pull Collegiate, seminary, and academic 
courses; un* Qualed musical :ind elocuiioDarv advantages; terms moderate. 
Address MRa u. T. MILLS, Mills College P.O , Cal. 

The BROOKS-FOLLIS ELECTRIC CO. 

Importers and Jobbers of p?l FCTDICyAI 

523 Mission St. Tel. Main 861 SUPPLIES 

San Francisco, Cal 

Joseph Olllott's Steel Pens, 

Gold Medals. Paris. 1878-1B89. These pens are " the 
best In the world." Sole agent for the United States 
Mb, Henry Hoe. 91 John street, New York. 
Sold by all Stationers. 



Nelson's fltiiyGOse. 



Unequalled for Poison Oak, Sunburn, all Irritation of the Skin, 
and for the Toilet generally. 

For a first-class Fish, For a first-ciass Hunt, 

For a first-class Camp, 

For a delightful rest at some beautiful Resort, 

Go to that country tributary to the 

San Srancisco and 



Free Camping Grounds, 

Clean, Comfortable Hotels. 
M> derate prices within the 
reach of all. 
Low Railroad Rates. 



7/orth Pacific &y. 



For detailed Information applv at TICKET OFFICE: 850 MARKET ST., 
ii'tmmiclc 1! dialog), or GENERAL, OFFICE: Cor. Sansome and Califor- 
nia Str. • 

A. W. FOSTER, Pres. and Gen'l Mgr. R X RYAN, Gen Pass. Agt 



July 24, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO XF.WS I.fiTTER. 



THE WHEEL OF FORTUNE. 

V, 

THE peace that reigned among the gamblers of the 
early sixties was largely due to the fact that every 
man of them carried arms. No one ever thought of mov- 
ing abroad without knife or pistol, and generally were 
provided with both. Dealers were selected for their cool- 
niil courage, as well as their skill. They were, iu 
the most intense meaning of the word, "game men" all 
through. Kobinson's game on Clay street was one night 
visited by a desperado named Withers. This fellow was 
known to be a dead shot, and one who rarely drew his pis- 
tol without using it. He used to boast that he could go to 
any game in town without a cent, and bulldoze the dealer 
into " heeling" him with chips. This came to Robinson's 
ears, and he plainly, and perhaps profanely, intimated 
that if Mr. Withers came his way he would have to put up 
for his chips or stay out of the game. The test soon came. 
Reub Withers walked in and asked for a stack of blue 
chips. 

" Let's see your money, Reub," said Robinson, coolly. 

" Here's my security," grinned Withers, presenting a 
pistol at Robinson's head. The gambler looked at him 
sternly, and said in an impressive voice, " Put up that 
pistol," Reub. " His voice had a hypnotic effect upon the 
desperado, who returned the weapon to his pocket. Now 
came Robinson's turn. Still keeping his gaze fixed on 
Withers, he opened a small drawer by his side and took 
from it a derringer. Quick as a flash he turned it on the 
bluffer. 

' ; Xow," be shouted, ''hold up your hands, and if you 
do not quit this game in five minutes 1 will put a hole 
through you." Withers started for the door, and to ex- 
pedite bis retreat Robinson sent a bullet after him, miss- 
ing him by only a few inches. So disgusted did he feel that 
he left for Mexico, aud when he returned to California 
celebrated his visit by stabbing a man to death in a saloou 
on Kearny street. He was tried, but managed to escape, 
and left the State again, this time never to return. 

Chris Lilly, a fighter as well as gambler, was a leading 
character in those early scenes. Chris was a pudgy, 
good-natured fellow, and one of the "dressiest" men on the 
street. He and Withers came to California together from 
New York in a schooner around the Horn, bringing with 
them two ladies of notorious reputation, which they in- 
stalled here as their mistresses, and gave many kettle- 
drums and soirees to the green-cloth fraternity. Lilly was 
a great epicure. Besides his income from the cards, and 
he was exceedingly expert, he received a large allowance 
from home. He lived in the most extravagant style, and 
was a frequent guest at the banquets given at Steve 
Whipple's rooms on Commercial street. Here sat down 
Colonel Jack Gambill, Ned Moses, Ned Carriere, Jim Ryn- 
ders, Bill Thompson, and others, all the very flower of the 
profession. Those were grand feasts, better even than 
John Scott's on Montgomery street. Southdown mutton, 
that delicacy most rare in those times, when indeed mutton 
of any kind was not abundant, was imported from British 
Columbia for those feasts. It is not necessary to say that 
the wines were of superb quality, and the other matters 
in harmony with the grandeur of those reunions. The 
guests were composed of the leading men of all profes- 
sions, who were only too pleased to be selected for those 
peerless entertainments. 

Steve Whipple, the host, was himself a prince among 
gamblers. The building on Commercial street, where his 
game was run, was erected by himself. He made money 
easily and in large sums, and had the faculty of keeping it. 
He was a steady, domestic man, devotedly attached to his 
family. He became blind, and then passed the remainder 
of his days in San Mateo County. 

Whipple never forgot a friendly act, and helped many an 
old-timer out of a bad scrape. He built a steamer and 
called her after his daughter. One day as Steve was on 
the wharf watching the boat come alongside, he was 
accosted by a very seedy and despondent-looking indi- 
vidual. 

" You don't know me. Steve," said the wanderer. 

" Yes I do," said Steve; ' ' you and I were at school in 



Rhode Island together I tut. how did you ever come to 
this pas 

Mr detailed his misfortunes. Whipple took him up town, 
and got him an outfit, and on the next trip of the Whipph 

his old school mate went along ;is purser. 





Smoking Tobacco ## 



THE 



California Hotel '■> Hotel Rafael 



Absolutely Fireproof. 

San Francisco . . . Gal. 





THE 



Wj$ Open all the year. Only 50 
;"V*^ minutes from San Francisco. 



>.-•< 



San Rafael 




Two modern, exquisite, home-like tirst-class hotels, 
both under personal supervision of Gen. Warfleld. 

R. ft. WflRFlELD & GO., Proprietors 



New York. Madison Square, Broadwau and 23d 

Street. 

Under new management. Rooms single or 
en suite. Restaurant unsurpassed. Ele- 
gant in all appointments at moderate 
prices. 

Reed & Roblee, Props. 



EUROPEAN PLAN. 



HOTEL. 
BflRTftOLDI 

New York 



Hotel Bella Vista 



1001 Pine street 



ft First- class Hotel. 
Occidental Hotel. 



The Bella Vista is the Pioneer 
Fitst-class Family Hotel of 
San Francisco. All the com- 
forts of a modern residence. 

MRS. A. F. TRACY 



A quiet home, centrally looated, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 



Wm. B. Hooper, Manager. 



San Francisco 



Sells Burial Lots 
and Graves. 
Perpetual Care. 



LAUREL MILL 

Gemetery 
Association 



Junction of Bush 
street and 
Central avenue, 
San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 24, 1897. 




•5- 



JVtonerf C e^ rn^Mft^-^ 



THE room was full of the delicate perfume of violets. A 
jar, holding the purple flowers, stood on the table be- 
side the bed. The man who had just entered the room re- 
moved the unlighted weed from his lips and stood motion- 
less, inhaling the fragrance. 

With an angry exclamation he strode to the window, 
lifted the sash, and threw the offending flowers as far as 
his strength would permit. Down, down, they fluttered, 
swaying this way and that like living things, in the brisk 
evening wind, until they touched the turf of the well-kept 
plaza of the hotel. 

A Hood of soft moonbeams poured into the room. The 
man stood quietly in the refulgent glow. He was thinking 
moodily: "Pah! Violets were reminiscent of Alicia." He 
did not wish to think of her now, when the glamor of an- 
other scene was so freshly upon him — a scene in a dim old 
garden, where grew palms and the tall pelargenim, where 
brilliant poppies blossomed in rank profusion, and the soft. 
languorous tones of a Castilian patois made music in his ears. 

Who could have put violets in his room ? It must have 
been Lee Wing, the Chinese boy, though sentiment in the 
almond-eyed heathen there was none. It could not be 
that Alicia was here — and his brow darkened and curses 
sprang to his lips. "Nonsense. It was impossible;" and 
he threw himself upon the bed, and lived over again that 
hour in the neglected garden — lived with shining eyes and 
smiling lips until dark iashes and soft arms mingled with 
the fantasies of dreamland. 

Herbert Somers had left his affianced wife in an old 
Puritan town in Massachusetts, three years before, while 
he set out to seek his fortune. The wedding day had been 
set for the autumn, toward which the date of our story is 
fast hurrying. His letters to her had grown less frequent 
with the years, and he coldly analyzed his feelings toward 
her now. She had been a little sister to him, obedient and 
trustful. He had blindly offered himself one afternoon, 
when she wore a white gown with violets at her breast and 
in her hair. He loathed violets now. 

She wrote him pathetic little letters, full of prayers and 
happy tears, and in return he sent her sketches of his 
life among a new people — careless letters to which she 
turned as to a fetich, as devout a little heathen as could be 
found in a New England village in this century. 

But her name never sprang to his lips; his heart was not 
in her keeping. However, he had fully determined to go 
to the old home and marry Alicia, in September. He 
would probably have carried his promise into execution if 
he had not been bliad-folded by fate and sent to Monterey, 
ostensibly for business, but actually that Love might en- 
tangle him in her silken meshes. 

He had tarried two weeks in the old Spanish town al- 
ready. Perhaps certain glances from a dark-eyed Senora, 
who was a guest at the same hotel, could have told why he 
lingered, even when in his pocket there were letters from 
his firm urging him to move on to fresh pastures. Two 
pairs of eyes, one tender, one compelling, can no more be 
governed by the rules of ordinary life than can the tide 
cease to flow by the mysterious attraction of the moon. 

Somers was in an enchanted land. His sensibility to 
beauty, his capacity for loving, had in a few weeks' time 
grown into a giant influence, which he could not control. 
Time passed— a lustrum in a moment — he heeded it not, 
for the beautiful woman with the inscrutable eyes walked 
and talked with him every day in the old garden, where 
pious monks and zealous padres had been wont to meditate 
and pray. 

It was late when Somers awoke the morning after the 



violets had been so rudely tossed away. He dressed him- 
self hurriedly and hastened to the breakfast room. The 
Senora was already there. On her way she had picked 
up a bunch of dew-drenched violets that had lain all night 
upon the grass, and there was a restless glitter in the 
eyes she turned upon the man beside her. It was Don 
Gonzales, her husband. 

He had reached the place late last night, the garrulous 
waiter told Somers, as he lingered over the rolls and the 
bacon. The Sefior was a rich coffee planter and the Senora 
was not half his age. Shameful, this buying and selling of 
hearts. Somers gave a furtive glance in the direction of 
the new-comer. Don Gonzales had fine features of a light 
mahogany hue, but there was a squareness about the chin 
and a look of determination in the eyes that would have 
told a less interested observer that he was not a man to 
be trifled with. Somers took courage, and after break- 
fast he leisurely followed the pair to the broad piazza, 
where he was duly presented. Don Gonzales proved to be 
a gentleman of intelligence, and of some culture. He was 
particularly affable toward the young American. 

The love making proceeded more cautiously, now. 

It was night. The air wafted a thousand sweet scents 
from the old garden. Strolling through its unkept 
paths, with eyes half-closed but sensibilities keenly alert, 
were Somers and the Senora. His arm had strayed un re- 
buked about her waist. The music of her voice wooed him 
like a siren's song. Strange, strange, that he blessed the 
lucky chance that had brought him to this place. She 
stretched forth her white arms and laid them lingering 
about his neck. He stooped and kissed her. Just then 
there was a sound of hastily retreating footsteps as if 
their owner had grown incautious, under the influence of 
some strong emotion. 

The moon hath eyes, and a thousand orbs are the stars. 
More than once before Somers fancied that he heard re- 
treating footsteps as he returned from a stolen meeting, 
but the cordial manner of Don Gonzales had thrown him 
completely off his guard. 

A moonlight ride had been arranged upon the road that 
winds beside the beach. At the last moment word was 
sent that the Senora was too ill to go. But Don Gonzales, 
with strange insistence, declared that Somers should not 
lose the pleasure of the evening for the trifling indisposi- 
tion of a woman. 

Somers climbed into the showy trap with a curious pre- 
sentiment of evil. Don Gonzales held the reins, and they 
started off with the clanking of the silver-mounted harness 
and a crack of the whip. 

Two hours later. The scene is transcendently beautiful. 
The noon that pours her beams upon the shimmering water 
of the ocean is sending long bars of light through the 
blinds of a window where a sad-eyed Senora is pacing her 
room, a prisoner behind a bolted door. She. transforms 
the landscape into radiant beauty to a traveler riding 
swiftly along the shore line alone; but she is as cold as 
death to the man bound by ropes, gagged, and stretched 
upon the beach, his eyes staring straight upward to the 
star-lit sky. 

It was Somers waiting for death. The tide was coming 
in. He could hear it lapping the ragged edge of sand. In 
an hour's time the place where he lay would be submerged 
and he would be a ghastly thing, borne out on the bosom of 
the ocean. Caught like a rat in a trap, and he struggled 
with his bonds. His last thought was not of Alicia, but of 
an old court where flowers and vines grew rankly, and of 
the soft glances of the woman that he loved. The winds 
seemed to whisper her name, the stars blinked in sym- 
pathy, and Somers went out into the unknown with a 
smile upon his lips for the Sefiora. 

***** 

In a New England country town a young woman was 
sitting by her window, looking out into the empty night, 
and dreaming such dreams as come to the young. Finally 
she extinguished her candle, and kneeling by her white 
bed prayed for him who had already entered into the castle 
of death. 

Great Reduction In prices during the summer months on Art Goods, 
Plotures. Crookery, Glassware, etc. S. & G. Gump, 118 Geary street. 

Jackson's Napa Soda kills malaria. 



July 24, 1897. 



PAN FRANCISCO XKWS I.KTTKU 



8 

■r»"r 



HOME 



DEGORATK 




FLO WEB rooms are still in the height of their popular- 
ity, nor is the fashion confined to bedrooms alone, but 
finds favor also for sitting-rooms and summer parlors. 
The flower chosen is generally selected for sentiment as 
well as beauty. We have seen rose, daisy and violet bed- 
rooms. Lilacs, poppies or buttercups are also suitable. 
To furnish a flower room which shall be perfectly satisfac- 
tory there are certain general rules to be observed. In 
the first place, the flower itself must be present in suffi- 
cient quantity to give character; secondly, there must be 
enough of plain color to emphasize that character; thirdly, 
there must be no color which does not appear in the 
flower, except green and olive, which are necessary for a 
relief to the eye. The woodwork, too, must be carefully 
considered. If painted it can be cream-white, or of one of 
the lighter shades used. Some decorators recommend 
clear stain on natural wood to bring it into harmony with 
the color scheme. In the case of pine and the other 
cheaper woods, or of oak, it is perfectly admissible. When 
the wood chosen is expensive, chosen for its own beauty, 
it becomes the keynote of the room, and all other fittings 
must be made to harmonize with it. Again, the furniture 
in a flower room must be light and delicate, never aggres- 
sive or too large for the apartmant. 

A very successful room of this description is a sweet 
pea parlor. In this case the flower itself is present only 
on the curtains of cream white china silk, which are 
powdered with sweet peas of all colors, and in the great 
bowls of the living blossoms which from June to October 
are gathered from the owner's garden. The wall is pale 
green. The ceiling and frieze are in shades of pink. The 
white enameled furniture and the divans are upholstered 
in pink Agra linen. On the latter are heaped silk cov- 
ered pillows of every hue of the flowers as well as several 
in green. The carpet is pale green filling with white fur 
rugs laid here and there, and the tiles of the fireplace are 
pale pink. The pictures are water-colors in flat ash frames 
clear-stained in green. 

In an extremely pretty mignonette bedroom, the flowers 
are represented only in the paper and the embroidered 
covers of dressing table and bed and in the decorations of 
the china. The carpet, curtains, and the drapery of the 
top of the bed are all in shades of pale green and that sage 
olive tint once known as reseda. The furniture is green 
stained oak. 

Green looks well with almost any sort of furniture, es- 
pecially with oak, which most people choose for their din- 
ing-room woodwork and furniture. But for a room where 
the woodwork can be painted in harmony with the walls, 
one cannot do better than to buy one's furniture "in the 
wood," and have it colored with the stain sometimes called 
forest green and sometimes olive, finishing it with a coat 
of the best varnish to be had, or having it rubbed down by 
a professional polisher. To the table and chairs and side- 
board, one may add a side table with a shelf beneath, and 
a set of hanging shelves for china. The green wood is a 
charming background for china and silver, and has the ad- 
vantage of being a little different from one's neighbors' 
furnishings. 

A few hints on piazza furnishing may not be amiss at this 
season. To begin with, rugs should be spread upon the 
floor — Japanese jute rugs or the new fibre paper rugs are 
appropriate. The rattan or wicker furniture painted in 
forest green or even sealing-wax red is delightful. There 
should be one or two rattan couches, now made for piazzas 
which are light and comfortable and have arm and back 
on one end. Tbey are long, and a man may stretch him- 
self at full length upon them. One or two cretonne- 
covered pillows add to the comfort of these lounges. A 
round rattan table with flowered cretonne cover and 
several rattan rocking chairs should be provided, the 
table strewn with books and work. 



Midsummer furnishing goods, shirts, neckwear, etc., at Car- 
many's, 25 Kearny street, are the most tasty and latest arrivals in 
the city. 



OUR GREAT 



vtock- TJaking 
uacrifice uale^^^> 

NOW IN PROGRESS. 
EVERYTHING AT ^ 

•forcing ~ out ^Prices. 

See Daily Papers for Particulars. 




MURPHY BUILDING, Market and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

203 to 207 N Spring St. bet. Temple and First St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Christian Endeavor Rates 

Chicago and Northwestern 
Railway ...... 



Open to all via 



To Chicago - - $25.00 
To St. Paul and Minneapolis, 26.75 
To Milwaukee - - 26.00 



San Francisco 
to Chicago, 
3^days. 



Through Daily Pullman and Tourist sleeping Cars 
R. R. RITCHIE, G A. P. C . No. 3 New Montgomery St., Palace Hot 1 

MT. VERNON CO., Baltimore. 



The undersiened, having been appointed Agents for the 
Pacitic Coast for the sale of the manufactures of above 
company, have now in store : 

SAIL DUCK— ALL NUMBERS. 
HYDRAULIC— ALL NUMBERS. 
DRAPER AND WAGON DUCK. 

From 30 to 120 inches wide; and a complete assortment 
of all qualities 28%-inch duck, from 7 to 15 ozs., inclusive 
MURPHY, GRANT & CO. 



$1.25 



PARTRIDGE" 
Fountain Pen 

With toe Gold Pen Point. 

JOHN PARTRIDGE, 

Stationer. Printer, Bookbinder. 



IMPORTANT TO LAWYERS 
— BRIEFS 

Printed in a night if required. 
JOHN PARTRIDGE, 
Printer, 
306 California Street, S. F. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 24, 1897. 



£m/mL J&rfEtf 



Gold Under 
Alaskan Snows. 



A Blessing 
In Disguise. 



San Francisco should benefit largely 
by the eventual deve'opment of the 
Alaskan gold fields. That the yellow 
metal abounds in this northern latitude 
is now an assured fact, and barring the present drawback 
in the way of a far distant base of supplies, there is 
nothing extravagant in the way of difficulties to keep able 
bodied men and women out of this new sphere for the em- 
ployment of labor. There is no comparison between the 
rush to Alaska and the pioneer advance overland to Cali- 
fornia. Those who carried the banner of civilization west- 
ward across the plains in 1849 had dangers to face as well 
as the hardship and inconvenience of travel. The Alaska 
trip involves simply a religious care for the inner man in 
the form of a well-equipped commissary department. A 
peaceful night's sleep is not likely to be interrupted by the 
war-whoop of savage redskins intent on murder and rob- 
bery. The mosquito or gnat is the most dangerous 
enemy to be dreaded in the territory when their haunt is 
invaded. Commercial instinct and providence will be the 
sole guide in the advance northward, to the exclusion of 
that romance and heroism which attaches to the equally 
sordid mission of the California argonauts. 

Stayed temporarily in its westward ad- 
vance by the Pacific, it is natural that the 
course of empire should swerve northward 
in response tin a new attraction. The ex- 
citement now being fanned to fever heat by the press, 
sooner or later must culminate in a "rush." The sea voy- 
age is short, the fare comparatively low, and once landed 
the walking is good enough for those who have more time 
than money. At the diggings it will be a case of the sur- 
vival of the fittest. Weak constitutions will keep the 
ferry busy to another golden shore, where ice and snow 
can be discounted. Many will respond to the call of Dame 
Fortune, few will she select, and the horrors of Napol- 
eon's retreat from Moscow may be anticipated when a 
disappointed horde takes the back trail through wilds 
where all the money on earth could not buy a meal of 
victuals. The new find will serve a great need of the 
present in lieu of a bloody war. It will thii. out the con- 
gested population of cities on the Pacific Coast. 

The phantom of wealth will draw a vast 
Will Live army northward, but how depleted its 
m History, ranks would be. could the home returning 
stragglers be lined up for muster. But 
aside from this. gold, the universal god of the fortune 
hunter, poor and rich alike, and for which so many hunger 
whether they actually require it or not. will begin to pour 
into the channels of trade. Business will feel the revivify- 
ing effect of the steady stream, prosperity will again 
dawn upon the commercial classes in the metropolitan 
cities of the Pacific Coast, the treasuries of the transpor- 
tation companies will wax fatter than ever before, while 
the name of the Klondyke. with its Bonanza. El Dorado 
and other golden tributaries, will go down immortalized in 
the world's history alongside Ophir, California. Ballarat. 
and the more modern discoveries in South Africa and 
Westralia. May Klondyke live and prosper, with all its 
golden promises of fortune for those who go and those who 
stay at home. Bouii 1 ■ n avanl ' 

Hooley. the latest accident in company pro- 

A Freak of motion, now occupies the niche of attention 

Fortune. in London vacated by Barnato. Aspiring 

for new fields of conquest he has launched a 

big lace and embroidery concern calculated to astonish the 

natives, while reaching out at the same time to corner the 

Australian cold storage business. It is thought he will be 

lucky indeed should he escape getting cornered himself in 

the meshes of lace. 

The market on I'inc street has been dull 
Dull on during the past week, with prices fairlv 
P.ne Street, lirm. The scarcity of stocks, which is be- 
coming more apparent, predicates a higher 
range of values before long. No change is reported in the 
mines. 



Colonel W. J. Sutherland arrived in 
The New Works at town from Candeiaria during the 
Candeiana. week, where he has been pushing 

forward the plans for resumption of 
work in the mines under his control. Considerable atten- 
tion has been given at Candeiaria to the proving of 
machinery to be used in working the tailings and low 
grade ores belonging to the company. The result shows 
that the process saves sixty-five per cent, of the silver 
and ninety per cent, of the gold at a cost of seventy-five 
cents per ton. At Belleville the Holmes Company are 
erecting the Bailey process, which saves all the gold in 
the tailings and upwards of ninety per cent, of the silver 
value in the tailings, which give an assay value of (1.75 
gold and $6.00 silver. The cost of recovering these values 
will be less than #1.00 per ton. The works would have 
been running but for the recent cloud-burst which swept 
Belleville and the country on each side. This has delayed 
starting up for ten days. It is expected, however, that 
the plant will be running by the first of August. 

P. G. Ygarcia. A. Derre, and J. W. L. 
Some New Mine Monk are named as the vendors of the 
Quotations. Michoacan and San Francisco copper 
mines of Mexico, which have just been 
Hoated in London with a capital of £55,000. The property 
is located in the State of Michoacan. Mr. Derre is a well- 
known resident of this city. He was the successful vendor 
some years ago of the celebrated La Boleo copper mines 
of Lower California, one of the heaviest producers of the 
metal at the present day. Other Western American 
flotations during the same week were the Go'den State 
Mines of California, with a capital of £100,000, taken up 
by the Geldfonstein Estate and Gold Mining .Company; the 
Ruth Mines, located near Sandon, B. C, and the Rigi 
Group of gold mines at Cripple Creek. The last-named 
heads its list of Directors with the Earl of Essex and the 
Baron H. von Richthofen. 

The Pacific Borax and Redwood's 
California Borax Chemical Works, which now controls 
Highly Favored, the works in this city established by 
Mr F. M. Smith, has just had a meet- 
ing in London. The report for the past year shows a 
prosperous and gradually growing business in all parts of 
the world, where the superior virtues of the California 
product are now recognized and fully appreciated. Be- 
sides setting aside £4000 to the reserve, the Directors or- 
dered paid on the Uttb iust. dividends of l> per cent, on 
preferred shares and 7 per cent, on ordinary. A large 
demand was reported for the borax from manufacturers 
of different lines of goods where purity is an essential. 

Mr. Hamilton Smith has been re-elected 

Sells Mines a Director of the Frascr & Chalmers 

and Machinery. Company, the Anglo-American firm 

aged in the construction of mining 

machinery. Some of our American houses engaged in the 

same business could afford to follow the example and get a 

big mine promoter or two on their list of Directors. There 

is nothing like having a friend in court. 

The annual meeting of the Mariposa 

In Control of Kstate Company has just been held in 

Mariposa Estate, this city, at which the following officers 

and Directors were elected to serve 

for the ensuing year: \V. E. Lester. President; Colonel 

J. B. Low. Vice-President; C. W. Cross. A. C. Hamilton, 

and H. W. Gorham, Directors. Superintendent Stevens 

was re-elected. 

It should not be necessary to interject 

A Comstock British Columbia in brackets to identify 

In Miniature the new "Comstock .Mines " just floated ii. 

London. The paltry capital. 1250,000, will 

be sufficient in itself to indicate a distinction between this 

high-flying corporation and the big Nevada lode whose 

name has been taken in vain. 

The first shipment of copper from a BritJ 
Copper from ish Columbia mine is just reported from 
the North. Revelstoke to Mont real, en route to Great 
Britain. The bullion and matte, it is esti- 
mated, carries *.'>tin in silver and gold. 

A "Victoria'' is the latest conception of 
A Jubilee the Jubilee promoter — a new gold coin 
Gold Piece, representing sixty shillings. A half- Vic- 
toria gold will pass for thirty shillings. 



July 24. 1897- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«3 




' Hear the Crier !" "What the devil »rt thou!' 
'One that wlUolav the devil, sir, with you." 



LKT others pay the zero price 
* >f freezing for their gold. Methinks 
One winter's trial will BTjffioe 
Of polar bears and beans and rice. 

Than shake with chills on glacier brinks, 
I 'II stay at home and shake the dice— 
The Ckikk hath no love for ice 

Excepting that which cools his drinks. 

A 1 >RDIXG to the sporting editor of a local daily. 
thU city is now the only place in America where 
pugilistic contests of any prominence are being 'brought 
otl, " to use the plug-ugly vernacular, several fights of 
national interest being in store. Humiliating as this fact 
is. we wouldn't for the world change places with blue- 
blooded Boston, the city of beans, that spurned Bacchante's 
sculptured form. Boston is so absurdly modest that, 
rather than look at anything with the naked eye, she 
wears glasses. 

WILLIAM P. McEvoy, the gay and popular young 
Sheriff of San Mateo County, now bridal-touring in 
ambrosial orange groves, has been sued for breach of 
promise in the trifling sum of $20,000 by a girl he left be- 
hind him, Miss Emma Clark, who values the overlook at 
that amount. William has undoubtedly been fickle and 
rash in love, but what can one expect of the young fry, 
with the frightful examples set them by the frivolous old 
boys ? 

FLY fishermen, says an authority on finny affairs in a 
local daily, can find good sport now in tbe northern 
counties. No need to go so far. Experts in the fishing 
line who are fly enough, can find splendid sport right here 
in San Francisco the year round, the run of suckers never 
abating in this locality, and, while the game is not so edible 
a> trout, it is remarkably profitable. 

THERE may be nothing in a name, but Collector Wel- 
burn just now is living up to the last syllable of his. 
He thought he had Uncle Sam's money to burn, and now 
the conflagration is turning into a different kind of burn- 
ing. The gay Government official, in other words, is be- 
ing subjected to a disgraceful but deserved public roast. 
ft RECENT cablegram announced that Greece would be 
obliged to pay Turkey a war indemnity of £4,000,000. 
That clever mathematician, Colonel Cochran, has calcu- 
lated that this amount will purchase 400,000,000 glasses of 
beer, and he is so envious of Turkey that he has almost 
decided to take to water. 

SUNDAY sailing is not all plain sailing, as the weekly 
Morgue reports will testify. Pleasure-seekers with 
a yearning for marine diversions should qualify beforehand 
as sailors and swimmers before embarking to keep the 
Sabbath day holy and their heads above water at the same 
time. 

DR. ROTTANZI has got rid of the hats, and now he 
had better look to the hatpins. They seem to be the 
favorite weapons of assault among the south of Market 
ladies, and are as dangerous in their sharpness as the de- 
vastating tongues of more high-bred dames. 

QUITE an array of men seems to have followed Violet 
Clowes when she wandered on to the beach to her 
death last week, but when the gallants discovered that 
she was only going to drown herself, they considerately 
left her to her own devices. 

IT seems that the Stockton and Los Angeles Democrats 
have decided to let Governess Jim Budd make his next 
fight alone. This is reallv heart-rending. Imagine Jim 
Budd fighting all alone. Why, he might hurt himself. 

RN Eastern village is blowing because it has a floating 
bridge supported by air-tight whiskey barrels. That 
is nothing. San Francisco has a great many whiskey 
barrels floating about on two legs. 

THE prize offered to any one who could find the pretty 
girl among the Christian Endeavorers has not been 
awarded. 



ftPOET and an actor had a fracas this week but 
neither did much damage to ihe other's physical 
beauty. Nevertheless, the scheme of poets and actors 
clinching each other in mortal combat, or duelling merrily 
on the outskirts of town in the cold, gray dawn, is one that 
commends itself to the true lover of art and letters. This 
world is overpopulated with fourth-rate bards and ditto 
thespians. and the fatal duello would be hailed as a blessing 
by no means in disguise. 

THE sudden affections which has permeated the bosoms 
of little Dorothy Creede's mother and foster mother, 
who each in turn abandoned her, is beautiful to see though 
it is extraordinary that it should have been so long 
smothered and should burst forth so simultaneously. Can 
it be because Dorothy is to have the shekels? A cynic 
said so but the Crier repudiates the base suggestion. 
The departed miner's widow should spell her name with 
a "G." 

THEODORE F1GEL continues to regard the little 
episode of his arrest, incarceration and public dis- 
grace as a highly enjoyable joke. Figel's sense of humor 
is no doubt a conveniently comfortable possession for the 
sporty book-keeper, but in view of the fact that the ter- 
mination of the joke may come in hemp form, his levity, to 
the less jovial public sense, is somewhat ghastly. 

SSAN LEANDRO father complains to the District 
Attorney that his daughter uses paint and powder 
and keeps late hours, and petitions that she be sent to a 
reform school. Were all of the fair sex in San Francisco who 
are addicted to cosmetics and late hours to be thus dealt 
with, contracts would have to be let at once for the erec- 
tion of new reform-school buildings. 

LOS ANGELES informs us that the name of Bradbury 
came near being mixed up sensationally in a suit in- 
volving a nice little family row in which "Colonel" Polk and 
' 'Colonel" Bradbury, and the latter's sister and the former's 
ex-wife, would have figured with spicy prominence. The 
scandal mills of Los Angeles should go on a strike. They 
are badly overworked. 

ONE Keefe, a compositor called in as an expert on type 
in the discussion relating to blanks in the Fair-Craven 
case, found many injured letters, battered punctuation 
marks and alphabetical characters without tails. This is 
quite consistent with the whole interminable affair, in 
which reputations as well as the alphabet have shown up 
in badly battered and injured shape. 

IT H Schoolma'm Nettie on the stand, 

Tis clear her fine Italian hand 
Were more at ease in framing spanks 
Than bogus contract-marriage blanks. 

GAY Mrs. Amanda Fennel, late Marceau, late Fisk, 
and nee Heaven knows what, is about to go through 
the formality of divorce once more. She is on the best of 
terms with goggle-eyed Mr. Fennel — they go biking to- 
gether, and have some real nice times — but she wants a 
little change and is ready like the barber to cry "Next!" 
Her latest idea seems to be : first try it on the dog — vide 
her exhibit of names in the dog show. 

A GAS trust war is on. Any householder who imagines 
that this signifies such distraction on the part of the 
companies that they will trust consumers until the battle 
is over, would bettei find out his error before the meter is 
shut off. It is a gas trust all right, but not that kind. 

THE recent Butcher's Picnic was a comparatively 
peaceable affair, the only slaughtering indulged in be- 
ing confined to sundry barrels of beer. Although many of 
the festive cleaver wielders came home well loaded, no 
shooting scrapes disturbed the holiday harmony. 

SAKS Dr. Case: "We're saved by hope." 
I doubt the Doctor's horoscope. 
I think that we are saved by soap. 

S LOCAL paper says that Debs is shadowed by detec- 
tives. This is doubtless true. He will be shadowed 
by the gallows if he persists in his present announced plan 
of colonization. And this is of more importance to the 
Debs neck. 

PRESIDENT McKinley_ is likely to visit this Coast next 
fall. We are preparing to open a public subscrip- 
tion fund for the purchase of a rubbei arm for him. Manu- 
facturers of rubber goods will please send in estimates. 



w 1 



«4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 24, 1897. 







GOOD-BYE, MY SWEETHEART -Madeline s.bridge,in Leslie's weeklt- 

The sleep is broken, the fair dream ended— 

Sweet sleep that crowned us, dear dream that blest! 
Life's faded robe may be patched and mended, 

For daily wear, but no more for best. 
We too, poor spendthrifts were gay together, 

Deep deep, we drank of life's richest wine— 
And all our weather was summer weather, 

When I was yours, dear, and you were mine. 
My eyes seemed made but to seek and find you, 

My voice to call you, my hands to press, 
My lips to kiss you, my arms to bind you, 

My soul to know you, and my heart to bless ! 
The rain blew by us, the stars shone o'er us— 

We laughed at snowfall— at cloud and sun, 
What fear had we, of the way before u-< ? 

We walked together— all roads were one! 
How rich we were! but our wealth is squandered; 

How gay we were! We are gay no more— 
Apart and apart our feet have wandered ; 

Our eyes are heavy— our hearts are sore. 

Hut, oh, my sweetheart! God love and guard you 
For my poor sake, who have loved you well, 

Who no more may call you, nor look toward you 
From highest Heaven, nor from deepest Hell. 



ONE WOMAN'S LIFE— sella hunt, n- r- world. 

A sudden glimpse of strange things in a strange new world, 
A little puny protest 'gainst existence hurled 

A lot of smiles and rocking, and a lot of aches and strife 
Soapsuds bath and catnip tea— 

And that is Life. 

A chasing bees and butterflies through spring's bright days, 
A plucking gold-eyed daisies in the woodland ways, 

A little bread and sugar, and a little fuss and rife, 
Mud pies and broken dolls— 

And that is life. 
A little books and music and an "art" or two, 
A sweetheart, and a long dress, and some gum to chew. 

A ring and a love-letter, "Will you be my wife?" 
A wedding veil and bridal tour— 
And that is life. 

A little home and dishes, and some rooms to sweep ; 
A lot of tumbled castles, and a lot of tears to weep, 

tie joys as sweet as heaven, some pains keen as a knife: 
Then creeping down the "shady side"— 
And that is life. 



AN EGYPTIAN BANQUET.-r. w. higginson- 

A crowded life, where joy perennial starts; 

The boy's pulse beating 'mid experience sage; 

Wild thirst for action, time could ne'er assuage; 
Countless sad secrets, learned from weary hearts ; 
New thresholds gained, as each full hour departs ; 

Long years read singly, each an opened page; 

Love's blissful dreams and friendship's priceless gage; 
A name grown famous through the streets and marts; 
Knowledge advancing; thoughts that climb and climb; 

Aims that expand ; new pinions that unfurl ; 
Age that outstrips all promise of its prime ; 

Hope* whirh their prayers at utmost heaven hurl,— 
Till in an instant, in a point of time. 

Death, the Egyptian, melts and drinks the pearl. 



SPRING VIOLETS.— grace hibbard, in Springfield republican- 

" Wear them, and think of me to-day," I said 

And fastened violets upon her dress, 
Their perfume floated upward to her face, 

Like some fair spirit's loving, fond caress. 
They stayed with her through all that springtide day, 

Those wild-wood blossoms— why are they so blest? 
And when the stars shone in the evening skies, 

Their life work done, they died upon her breast. 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

RESTAURANTS. 
Bergez's Restaurant, Academy Building, 33*3-334 Pine street, below Mont- 
gomery. Rooms for ladies and families; private entrance. John Bergez 
Proprietor. 
Malaon Tortoni, French Rotisserle, HI O'Farrell street. Private dining 

rooms and banquet ball. S. Constantlnl, Proprietor. 
Poodle Dog Restaurant, S. E. cor. Grant ave. and Bush st. Private 

dining and banquet rooms, Tel. 429. A. B. Blanco & B. Brun. 

DENTISTS. 
Dr. Franklin Pancoast removed to 30 O'Farrell street, rooms 16, 17 * 36 

MEDICAL. 
Dr. Hall, 14 McAllister St.. near Jones. Diseases of women and children. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
8electiom on approval: any place in world. W. F. GREANY, 837 Brannan 
The W. H. Hoiiis Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105 O'Farrell St., S. F. 

BOILERMAKERS. 
P. F. Dundon's San Francisco Iron Works, 314, 316, and 318 Main street. 
Iron Work of every description designed and constructed. 

CANDIES. 

Maiilard's Chocolates in '■» and 1-lb boxes. Roberts', Polk and Bush. 

LADIES' HAIR DRESSING. 

Hermann Schwar2e (known as Hermann at Strozynski's) has opened 
Ladies' Hair Dressing Parlors at all Powell st. Telephone Main 6820 



BANKING. 



Bank 0! British Columbia. 

Southeast Cob. Bush and Sansome Sts. 
Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1863. 

Capital Paid Up K.OOO.OGO 

Reserve Fund 1 500.U0U 

HEAD OFFICE 60 LOMBARD STREET, London 

Branches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster. Kamloops, Nan- 
lamo, Nelson, Sandon, and Kaslo, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon. 
This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available In all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon Us Head Office and Branches, and upon Its Agents, as follows : 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada ; Chicago— First National Bank ; 
Li verpooLt— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
South America — London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company or 
Sydney, Ld; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

The flnglo-Galifornian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized 18,000,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 

Paid Up l,6OU,000 

Reserve Fund 700,000 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts 
Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sells drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART I „.„._„. 

P. N. LILIENTBAL f "»»»««" 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

No. 526 California Street. San Francisco 

Guarantee capital and surplus C3.040.20I 66 

Capital actually paid up in cash.. 1.000 000 00 

Deposits December 31, 1896 27.7i0.247 46 

OFFICERS: President, B.A.Becker; First Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier, A. H. R Schmidt; 
Assistant Cashier. William Herrmann; Secretary. George Tourny ; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. Muller: Attorney, W. S, Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: B A. Becker. Daniel Meyer. H. Horst- 
mnon. Ign. Steiohart, N. Van Bergen, E, Rohte, H B. Russ, D. N. 
Walter and N. Ohlandt 

Wells Fargo & Go.'s Bank. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets 

John J. Valentine President 

Homer S King Manager 

H. Wadsworth Cashier 

F. L. Lipman Assistant Cashier 

Cash Capital and Surplus M.250,000 

BRANCHES. 
N. Y.CIty. H. B. Parsons, Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldridge, Henry 

E. Huntington. Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles 

F. Crocker, Dudley Evann. 

Security Savings Bank. 

242 Montgomery St. Mills Building. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 

LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 
William Alvord S. L. Abbott, Jr. H. H. Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O.D.Baldwin E J. McCutchen 

Adam Grant W. S Jones J. B. Lincoln 



July 14, 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



15 




BANKING. 



The Minister — Well, Bobby, bow do you like your new 
brother? Bonny— Ob, purty good. Tiik Minister— I 
suppose, then, that you are glad he came here instead of 
going on to Mr. Green's? Bohhv — Yes. But tbey's one 
thing bothers me. The Minister — What is it, Bobbie? 
Bobiiy — Blamed if I can see how the doctor got him into 
that little bit of a satchel of his without breakin' every 
bone in his body. — Cleveland Leader. 

She passed the busy pave along, 

With an affected grace, 
While 1, amid the wide-eyed throng, 
Swept by her painted face. 

But, though her eyes, like ashing coat, 

O'erarched with smiling art, 
I saw the dust upon her soul 
And the mold upon her heart. 

—New York Press. 

The good lady scrutinized him closely. "Didn't I give 
you a whole mince pie a day or two ago?" she inquired in 
tones which resembled an amateur cold wave for iciness. 
"Yes, mum," replied the occupant of the outcast overcoat, 
"I'm the same party; but I've recovered, and if you'll 
make it plain bread and milk this time I'll be heartily 
obliged." — Baltimore News. 

"Yes, Miss Ethel, if your sister had ever allowed me to 
kiss her before we were engaged I never should have 
asked her to become my wife." "Oh, she knew that well 
enough; she had it played on her too often before." — 
Brooklyn Life. 

"You told me this horse had won half a dozen matches 
against some of the best horses in the country. He can't 
trot a mile in six minutes to save him." "It was in plow- 
ing matches that he took the prizes, sir." — Detroit Free 
Press. 

"How is it that your son's head seems to be drawn to 
one side? Only a year ago he was as straight as an 
Indian." "I can only account for it through the fact that 
he did his courting on a tandem." — Detroit Free Press. 

"My friend," solemnly remarked the man in black, "you 
don't know how hard it is to lose your wife." "Hard?" he 
echoed; "my dear sir, it is simply impossible." — Chicago 
Herald. 

"Desdemona Peyster must be a very indolent young wo- 
man." "What makes you think so?" "She is going to 
marry a man who is already bald." — Philadelphia Times. 

"I believe you men think more of your bicycles than you 
do of your wives." "Why not? We can get an improved 
make every year." — Tid-Bits. 

"Do you know, Tom kissed my hand last night." "He 
always was discriminating." — Truth. 

A DELIGHTFUL complimentary reception was ten- 
dered to Miss Anna E. Klumpke by the Art Associa- 
tion at the Hopkins Institute of Art on Thursday evening. 
Miss Klumpke is a native daughter who has achieved suc- 
cess as an artist in oil and genre, and her work has been 
honored at exhibitions given at Paris, Rouen, Versailles, 
Liverpool, New York. Philadelphia, Boston, and other 
places. Miss Klumpke is on her first visit to relatives and 
friends on this Coast after an absence of several years. 
The exhibition of her work will continue until August 22d, 
will contain forty of her pictures, and give those invited 
an opportunity to judge to some extent of her success. 

The Maison Kiche, the justly-famous French restaurant, corner 
Geary street and Grant avenue, sets a splendid dinner between the 
hours of 5 and 9 o'clock every day. The reputation of the Maison 
Riche extends around the world. Every delicacy of the season 
served in most faultless manner, lures the jaded appetite, and sweet 
music and fine wines serve to make up a menu unexcelled anywhere 
on earth. 

Other waters try— Jackson's Napa Soda gets there. 



California Safe Deposit and Trust GomDanu. 

Cor. California and Montgomery Sts. 

Capital Fully Paid $1,000,000 

Transacts a general banking business 
and allows interest on deposits payable on demand or after notice- 
Acts as Executor, Administrator, and Trustee under wills or in any 
otber trust capacity. Wills are drawn by the company's attorneys and 
are taken care of without charge. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES to rent at prices from $6 per annum up- 
ward according to size, and valuables of all kinds are stored at low rates. 
Directors : J. D. Fry, Henry Williams, I. G. Wiokersham. Jacob C. 
Johnson, James Treadwell, F. W. Lougee, Henry F. Fortmann, R B. Wal- 
laoe. R. D. Fry, A. D. Sharon, and J. Dalzell Brown. 

Officers: J. D. Fry, President; Henry Williams. Vice-President; R. 
D. Fry, Second Vice-President; J. Dalzell Brown, Secretary and Treas- 
urer; £ E. Shot well, Assistant Secretary; Gunnison, Booth & Bartnett, 
Attorneys. .^___„_ 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, 
Mechanics' institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital »1,000,000 

Paia-Up Capital t 300,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President. S. G. MURPHY, Vioe-Presldeiit. 

JOHN A. HOOPER, Vioe-President. 
Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James Mofflt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, 
and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Deposits may he sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co . , or Exchange 
on City Banks, Whenopening accountssend signature. 

San FrancisGo Savings Union. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits, Dec. 31, 1895 124,^02,327 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus. . . . 1,575,631 
ALBERT MILLER, President | E. B. POND, Vioe-President 
Directors— Thomas Magee, G. W. Beaver, Philip Earth, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fremery, George C. Boardman, Robert Watt; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by oheok of reliable 
parties, payable in San Francisco, but the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the actual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 

fiass-book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9. A. M. to 3 p. m. Saturday even- 
ngs,6:30to8. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited. 

N.W. Cor. Sansome & Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital (3,500,000 

Paid Up Capital 18,000,000 

ReserveFund I 850,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cie, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers 1 Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM 1 Mttna . BrB 
C. ALTSCHUL J managers. 

GroGker-Woolworth National Bank of S. F. 

Corner market, Montgomery, 

and Post Streets. 

Paid-Up Capital 11,000,000 

WM. H.CROCKER... President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W.KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Chas. F. Crocker, E. B. Pond, Hy. J. Crocker, Geo. W. Scott 

The Sather Banking Company. 

Suocessor to Sather & Go. 
Established 1851, San Francisco. 

Capital 1 1 ,000,000 

Jambs K. WiiiBON President. Albert Miller, Vioe-President 

L. I. Co wgill. Cashier. F. W. Wolfe, Secretary. 

Directors— C. S. Benedict, E G. Lukens, F. W. Sumner, Albert Mil 
ler Wm.P. Johnson, V. H. Metcali 1 , James K. Wilson. 

Agents : New York— J. P. Morgan & Co. Boston— National Bank of the 
Commonwealth. Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago— Continental Na- 
tional Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First Na- 
tional Bank. London— Brown, Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co 

Bank of California, San Francisco. 

Capital and Surplus, $6,000,000 

WILLIAM ALVORD President I CHARLES R. BISHOP. . Vice-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY.. Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith A ss't Cashier 1 1. F. Moulton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 
New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston — The Tremont Na- 
tional Bank; Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Union National 
Bank Philadelphia— National Bank of the Republic. St. Louis— Boat- 
man's Bank. Virginia City (Nev.)— Agency of The Bank of California. 
London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Roths- 
child Freres. BERLiN—Direction der Disconto Gesellschaft. China, 
Japan and East Indies— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China. 
Australia and New Zealand— The Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and 
Bank of New Zealand. 
L ette rs of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 24, 1897. 




Hilda Strafford, a California Story, by Beatrice Harraden. Published 
v l>odd, Mead A Company, Nesv York, 189". 

Miss Harraden is, beyond doubt, possessed of the nat- 
ural gift of telling a tale. The story before us is the pro- 
duct of her sojourn in Southern California, and was origin- 
ally published in serial form in The Cosmopolitan. The 
materials out of which it is constructed are simple, as are 
those of most tales worth the reading. Here is an outline. 
Bob Strafford, tired of a clerk's desk in London, and having 
a little money, takes up a fruit-ranch in Southern Califor 
nia, and, having got it into a fairly decent condition, asks 
his sweetheart, Hilda Lester, to come out and marry him. 
He has many misgivings as to how the gently-nurtured 
girl, accustomed to the concerts and theatres of London 
and to the society of well-bred people, will be able to en- 
dure life on a lonely ranch in the West, with much house- 
hold drudgery, and not a woman of her own social position 
to talk to. Hilda tries her best to bear up under the ad- 
verse conditions, but, though she cannot help admiring 
her husband's perseverance and industry, she cannot re 
concile herself to her surroundings. Worse than all, she 
finds herself falling in love with Ben Ovington, her hus- 
band's best friend, and a thoroughly good fellow. Ere 
long a violent storm comes, Strafford's reservoir, which 
he had constructed with so much labor, bursts, and most 
of the lemon trees are swept away. Hilda becomes more 
than ever convinced of her folly in leaving all the com- 
forts and refinements of her English home to take up the 
life of a lonely and unprosperous farmer's wife in a new 
country. She bursts out into reproaches, which so crush 
her husband, already weakened by exhausting labor in re- 
pairing the damage caused by the flood, that he is seized 
with fainting-fits, and not long afterwards dies in his 
sleep. Hilda has by this time discovered that she is in 
love with Ben Ovington, but, though he much admires her 
beauty, manner and style, he remains faithful to his friend's 
memory, and rejects her open advances. Hilda's father 
sends her money from England, Ben buys the ranch from 
her. and she returns to her native land. The story is 
genuinely pathetic, and is undoubtedly a true picture of 
the struggles and sufferings of many Englishwomen of 
good antecedents, whose husbands have bought at ex- 
travagant prices ranches or orchards in unprepossessing 
regions of the West. Of course, boomers and real-estate 
sharks, fearing lest Miss Harraden's strong story should 
deter some of ber countrymen from giving fancy prices 
for property in Southern California, have bitterly con- 
demned "Hilda Strafford." and have tried to represent it 
as the production of an invalid, morbid, melancholic, and 
indisposed to take a cheerful view of things. Your boomer 
lives in such an atmosphere of mendacity, exaggeration, 
verbosity and intoxication, that a plain statement is re- 
pulsive to him. But Miss Harraden, while she does not 
take the roseate and wine-inspired views of the land- 
agent, yet praises most heartily the beauties of the f'ali- 
fnrnian spring, and the weird charm of the scenery after 
your eyes have grown accustomed to it. And it is surely 
permissible to her as a literary artist to portray the 
feelings of desolation and heart-sickness that surge in the 
bosom of a well-bred Englishwoman, whirled in a few days 
from the soft, gentle, caressing air and verdant hills of 
the British Isles, to the barren, brown mountains, the 
dust-smothered roads, dust-laden air, and hard brilliant 
glare of California. Bereft of almost all the resources of 
civilization, and of all congenial society of her own sex, 
surrounded by people not merely unsympathetic, but often 
positively hostile, no wonder that blank despair seizes up- 
on her. As Ben Ovington says, and as Hilda acknow- 
ledges, 'Unless you know how to love desperately, there 
is not much to redeem the life" for such a woman. We 
may, of course, say that, if Hilda had been a truly noble 
woman, she would have crushed the regrets for her for- 
mer life, and forced herself to love California for her hus- 
band's sake. Possibly: but we have no right to expect 
the ordinary, well-brought-up girl to turn out a heroine; 
all that we have a right to look for is a reasonable sense 



of duty, and a reasonable willingness to perform it. That 
a Western woman, even though brought up in luxury, re- 
conciles herself readily to the conditions of ranch life may 
or may not be the case; but, even granting that it is so, it 
is nothing remarkable, though she has not been compelled 
to do housework herself, she knows that in the pioneer 
days her mother often had to do it, and she is familiarly 
acquainted with many other women who have cooked, 
baked, washed and ironed for their families. The feelings, 
therefore, of a woman of the Hilda Strafford type are ut 
terly foreign to the Western Woman: it is not that she has 
them, but stifles them from a sense of duty; it is that they 
never enter her mind. 

It is interesting and amusing to us to see how Miss Jean- 
nette Gilder, of the Critic (New York), regards the action 
of the Book Committee of the Mechanics' Institute of this 
city in excluding "Patience Sparhawk and Her Times" 
from their shelves. She says: " Mrs. Gertrude Atherton 
must have some shrewd friends out in San Francisco, for 
I see by the papers that the Book Committee of the Me- 
chanics' Library of that city has declared her recent 
novel, "Patience Sparhawk," unfit to circulate among the 
members of that institution. Now, while I do not care 
for "Patience Sparhawk," and think it a very unpleasant 
book, and not at all one for the Young Person to read, 1 
think that there are plenty of others that are as bad, if 
not worse; and I cannot see any reason for this action 
against Mrs. Atherton's novel, unless it be to suppress it 
into popularity. Such things have been done before, and 
will be done again just so long as there is the present 
competition among authors. If libraries are going to look 
after the morals of their patrons, they will have to ex- 
clude a long list of modern novels, and some of the old 
ones. If "Patience Sparhawk" is not a proper book for 
the shelves of a public library, neither is Mr. James Lane 
Allen's "Summer in Arcady." The only argument in favor 
of the latter as against the former, is that it has greater 
literary merit. But if I should mention all the novels 
that might be left out of public libraries to the advantage 
of their young readers, the list would fill more than half 
this paper." On investigation, we find that Mr. Allen's 
story of passion has been dealing havoc for nearly twelve 
months among the Young Persons who get their books 
from the Mechanics' Library. As we do not find that the 
book was recommended by any subscriber, its purchase 
must be attributed to the spontaneous action of the Book- 
Committee-men, whose duty is to order] the purchase of 
such books as the subscribers want, and not to act as cen- 
sors of morality, or to pass judgment upon the goodness 
or badness of books, about which there is no reason for 
suspecting that they know anything. 

Professor Brander Matthews has recently made a 
collection of what he is pleased to term "Briticisms," by 
which we suppose that he means English idioms not cur 
rent in Australia, Canada, or the United States. What 
the Professor has actually done is to rake out with inlin 
ite pains and labor half-a-dozen words, framed, perhaps 
half in jest, by distinguished British writers, and to call 
them British usages. Once again it must be pointed oul 
to the Professor that, while the universal use of a word or 
phrase by the inhabitants of North America does not 
make it good English, the general use of it by good 
speakers and writers in Great Britain does make it in- 
fallibly so. The term "Briticism" would have a logical 
meaning only if English were spoken purely in some coun- 
try outside of Australia, Canada, the United States, and 
Great Britain. Then words and phrases current only in 
Australia would be Australianisms, words and phrases cur- 
rent in Canada would be Canadianisms, words and phrases 
current only in the United States might be termed Ameri- 
canisms, and those current only in Great Britain might be 
named Briticisms. But where is the country outside of 
Australia, Canada, the United States, and Great Britain, 
whose usage is the standard by which all writers and 
speakers of the English language are to be judged? Do 
you suppose that it would disturb an educated Spanish 
gentleman to be told that his use of the Spanish language 
differed from that current in Brazil. Peru, Chile, or 
Mexico/ If he deigned to reply at all, would he not be 
very likely to say that, he sincerely hoped that some 
differences were apparent? 



July 34, 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



•7 



From The Midland Monthly, published at Des Moines, 
Iowa, we cull the following remarks relative to a San 
Krancisco publication: "The Overland Monthly, owned and 
run for fun by a company of millionaires, has dropped its 
price from three dollars to one dollar, and from twenty- 
five cents to ten cents. As a business move The Over- 
land's drop would surely prove fatal. Even on the theory 
that it is run for fun. its drop is an egregious blunder, tor 
some day the fun will cease, and then The Overland will 
cease as a business institution. The Far West and the 
Middle West can never build up a great magazine if their 
readers demand a ten-cent publication, for a good magazine 
can't be printed for ten cents — to say nothing of the cost 
of literary and editorial work — and no middle-Western or 
far- Western magazine can ever command the enormous 
quantity of advertising and the fabulous prices for it 
which enable a few Eastern magazines to make their ad- 
vertisers pay their bills for them." We do not know much 
about the millionaire owners who run The Overland "for 
fun,'' though we have sometimes thought that matter was 
printed in the magazine that would not have appeared 
there had the contributor of it not had some " pull " with 
the management; but we are quite sure that The Over- 
land will not come to grief through over-generous remun- 
eration of its non-millionaire contributors. For all this, 
however, we hope that the change of price will be justified 
by the results, and we think that, at any rate, one 
monthly publication in the Far West can get enough hitrh- 
priced advertising matter to pay the writers, artists, 
printers, and paper-dealers whose combined efforts pro- 
duce the magazine. 

The National Magazine for July contains " The Landing 
of the Emigrant," by Joanna R. Michols, a further install- 
ment of " The Life of Christ," and " Some Riminiscences 
of the Century," by Dr. E. E. Hale. R. H. E. Starr fur- 
nishes an article on "The American Tourist in Switzer- 
land," which has some effective illustrations, but is marred 
by the slipshod, commonplace language in which it is writ- 
ten. We are most attracted by an article on " The Chi- 
nese Literary Graduate," by W. T. Gracey. In describing 
his visit to the Examination Halls at Foochaw, Mr. Gracey 
amusingly says: "A party of four, consisting of two gentle- 
men, an interpreter, and myself": the inference is irre- 
sistible that neither the interpreter nor the writer are 
"gentlemen." In the Literary Department of Tbe Na- 
tional we come across a hard remark about William Dean 
Howells, to this effect: "When William Dean Howells at- 
tempts essays, he mostly unburdens himself of trash." 

Self Culture for July contains several good things. Sir 
Walter Besant writes on " Sixty Years of Social Change 
in England"; Clara E. Laughlin makes some true remarks 
under the heading of " Literature as a Career and Litera- 
ture as a Livelihood " ; and Dr. William Clark's sixth (and 
last) paper on " Knowledge, Life, and Work," deals with 
"Books on Reading." There is also an interesting inter- 
view with the Reverend A. H. Sayce, Fellow of Queen's 
College, Oxford, and the most eminent English Assyriolo- 
gist. Professor Sayce (happy man I) spends most of the 
year in a handsomely-appointed Nile dahubayeli in pursuit 
of his favorite study. Another well-known Oxonian, Dr. 
Mandel Creighton, the new Bishop of London, recently de- 
livered a speech at The Artists' Benevolent Institution on 
"Failures": the comments of The Spectator upon this 
speech are quoted. Taken altogether, the issue is an un 
usually interesting one. 

Messrs. Rand, McNally & Co., of Chicago, have issued 
as number 5 of The Oriental Library, "Storm Signals, 
The Anarchist, a story of to-day," by Richard Henry 
Savage. Number 7 of the same library is "Princess 
Alaska, a tale of two countries," also by R. H. Savage. 
A volume of this series is issued each week, and costs 25 
cents in paper covers. The volumes are sewn, and so may 
be easily kept open while being read. 

The July issue of Ev'ry Month contains an article on 
Fireworks by Henry Pain, one on Indoor Photography, 
and one on American and English Humor; also four original 
pieces of music, and other contributions chiefly oi interest 
to women. It is published by Howley, Haviland and Co. , 
of New York. 

All sensible people drink .Jackson's Napa Soda. 




Stick to the 

Directions, if you want to 
get th<- most good out of 
Pearline. ( Ithciwisc, you'll 
be putting in too much, 
and wasting the 
Pearline, and call- 
ing' it expensive. 
Or you won't put 
in enough, and so 
you won't get as much 
elp from it as you ex- 
pected, and youT have to do more work. 

Directions on every package for hot and 
cold water washing, with and without boiling. 
These simple, easy directions have revolu- 
tionized the work of washing. tea 

UNITED STATES 
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Telephone South 420, 



Office, 1004 Market Street. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Tel Bush 12. 



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Principal Office— -jm I'owpII street, opp. Baldwin Hotel. 

Branch — 1 1 Tiiylor street, near Golden '-iate avenue. 
Laundrv-F' H s r< ets, between Folsom and Howard. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



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Furnishes clean Tow> 
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fi clean roller towpu 



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DR. RICORD'S i;:, 

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and the medical celebrities 
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Sent by mail or express -tr 

PRICES REDUCED- R- > 
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the following low rates: Clean hand 
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Insurance policies guaranteeing titles to be 
i is-ued anH abstract* made and con- 
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Mills Building 
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\TIVE PILLS.— Buy none but the genu- 
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fd by the Academy of Medicine, Paris, 
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street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 

plliR fi 25; of 100 pills, »2; ofSOOpllls, 
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J. D. Spreckel* & Bros. Company, 



General Agents 



337 riARKET ST., 



N AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

n STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 
M'iHAM CEMENT. 
Hreraont, S. F. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Belcher Silver Mining Compny. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey Countv, Nevada 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 19ih day of July, 1897, an assessment (No 5f>) of Ten Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately in United StatPS gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of 
the company, rooms 37 and 38, ihird floo \ Mills building, Saa Francisco, 
California 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 

23d DAY O^ AUGUST, 1897, 
of said day, will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, 
and unless payment is made before will be sold on MONDAY, the 13th 
day of September, 1897, to pav the delinquent assessment, together with 
costs of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

C L. PERKINS, Secretary. 
Office— Rooms 37 nnd 38, third floor. Mills Building, N. E. corner Bush 
anc" Montgomery streets. San Francisco, Cal. 



i8 



SAN l-K.WCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 24, 1897 



ijteflfeis§te^@jj. 



CLIMBING parties are a great featureof the summer life 
at Blythedale, and many of the men consider a day lost 
which does not include the ascent of Mt. Tamalpais. Frank 
Willis, chief clerk for Goodall, Perkins & Co., is an inde- 
fatigable tramper, and warm as was Sunday mornin'r he 
succeeded in inducing three others to start out with him. 
After they had completed half the ascent, all but Willis 
went on strike and returned to the hotel, but the young 
Englishman pushed on alone and reached the summit in 
solitary state. 

By the time he reached Blythedale again, Willis was a 
picture. There was little trace of his usually well-groomed 
self in the hot and grimy climber. Just as he approached 
the hotel a number of ladies, who had arrived that morn- 
ing, saw him from their seats on the piazza and beckoned 
to him. Although a married man, Willis is very popular 
with the girls, but he steadily refused to see his friends. 
They finally sent a boy with a message, and that summons 
he could not ignore. 

He had been seated before the women about seventy- 
five seconds when he began to feel anew the effects of his 
hot walk. Perspiration rolled from him in streams, and 
in a few minutes miniature streams were coursing down 
his face, neck, arms, and legs, dropping and splashing on 
the floor. 

"Oh, mamma ! Look at Mr. Willis! He's leakin' ! " 
declared the Infant Terrible of the party in great excite- 
ment, the remark being heard all over the crowded piazza. 

Everybody looked at the woebegone Willis, and there 
was a general titter. Willis muttered something about 
his clothes being wet from having fallen in the river, and 
he made bis escape while his friends were trying to locate 
that stream. 

# # » 

A new nickname has beer, bestowed upon Colonel For- 
.est S. Chadbourne, and the rotund Harbor Commissioner 
now answers to the rather peculiar appellation of Humpty 
Dumpty. And thereby hangs a tale. There had been a 
little party on a tugboat, and "Chad" bad been the life 
of the party on the cruise around the bay. They were 
landed in the afternoon, after a luncheon consisting mainly 
of liquids, and Colonel Chadbourne absent mindedly struck 
up Folsom street. A car also passed up with an empty 
trailer in the form of one of the old bob-tailed horse cars, 
which, now that they have been supplanted by electricity, 
are sold as playhouses for children. The trailer was des- 
tined to make some youngsters happy, and was being taken 
along for delivery to its new owners, when Chadbourne 
climbed in, unobserved by the conductor on the forward 
car. The afternoon being warm, the Colonel was soon 
dreaming of nautical lunches, and slept calmly on after the 
little bob-tailed trailer had left the track and was being 
drawn over the cobbles and into the yard of its purchaser. 

The children gathered around to inspect their beautiful 
new playhouse, which, combining all the requirements of 
residence and car, seemed sent from Fairyland. Then they 
discovered the fairy asleep within. 

" I know what it is," piped one. " It's a Brownie ! " 

" No, it isn't," contradicted another. " It's Little Jack 
Horner." 

"You're both wrong," calmly declared the eldest child,, 
as the Colonel slid from his seat to the floor of the car and 
awoke; "don't you see ? He's Humpty Dumpty ! " 

• * « 

The political pot in the Press Club is having its annual 
bubbling fit, occasioned by the approaching election, 
scheduled for next month. The crop of candidates, always 
prolific, is unusually large this year, because the incoming 
administration will install the Club in the new Press Club 
Building, now in course of erection. On this account, 
rivalry is especially keen for the honor of the Presidency. 
Those most prominently mentioned so far for that office 
are Fred SS Myrtle, who has been secretary of the Club for 
the past three years, and who arranges and manages all 



the successful jinks of the club, and Wells Drury, news 
editor of The Call. William M. Bunker, proprietor of the 
Daily Report, is also talked of, but, it is understood, he 
dislikes club contests and wants the honor tendered to him 
unanimously. The members do not favor silver platter 
elections, however, and anyone who receives club honors 
this midsummer must fight for them. Another dark horse 
is Col. John P. Jackson, collector of the Port, and a 
veteran journalist. Even Mayor James D. Phelan is 
spoken of as a possible candidate, but the club will 
hardly be lucky enough to induce him to serve. Kimball 
Briggs, Dr. Philip Mills Jones, and W. C. Bunner may 
compete for the secretaryship, and among the possible 
Treasurers are P. S. Montague, who now handles the cash, 
E. D. Dement, who is Chairman of the House Committee, 
J. M. Shawhan and Dean Duke, Business Manager of the 
Post, Duke being far in the le,ad. In another fortnight 
the campaign will reach the red hot stage. 
# * * 

There is in every club a set of men who pride themselves 
upon their skill as amateur cooks. Their particular boast 
is the Welsh rarebit. Once let the conversation among a 
group in the afternoon turn upon this subject, and there 
is a wild clamor of tongues. Everyone puts forth bis 
recipe, and sneers at his neighbor's. Now, with the view 
of terminating this ceaseless controversy, one of the wise 
men of the Bohemian Club has proposed a contest, free to 
all, upon the following terms: Each competitor shall enter 
his name, and receive a sealed envelope with his number. 
This he draws from a hat, and no one but himself knows 
its denomination. A committee of five judges is selected. 
The competitors meet and draw lots for precedence. The 
winner of the first choice may go into the kitchen first if 
he chooses, or at any period of the contest. He has his 
own cheese with him, the kitchen furnishes the beer, por- 
ter and condiments of a general nature. The rarebit is 
made and sent in to the committee, with the author's 
number. It is eaten or merely tasted as the case may be, 
and voted upon. And so with the next, and the next, 
until all the dufi have had a representation. Then the 
ballots are counted and the winning number declared. The 
prize is to be a loving cup, the lid crowned with a silver 
rabbit with a leek in its mouth, as a declaration of its 

nationality. 

* * * 

T. F. Bonnet, the new License Collector, is having some 
novel experiences in his office with all sorts of people who 
are trying to escape the municipal tax or seeking informa- 
tion concerning the provisions and method of application 
of the license order. The other day bis telephone rang, 
and a young woman at the other end of the wire inquired: 

"Is Mr. Bonnet in?" 

"Yes, I am he," replied the License Collector. 

"Oh, are you the handsome gentlemen who used to be a 
newspaper reporter?" 

"I was a reporter till a few days ago," Bonnet confessed 
with a modest blush that could be felt warming the wire. 

"Oh, I have your picture. I cut it out of a paper." 

"Yes? What can I do for you?' 

"Oh, I just wanted to know how old a dog must be be- 
fore a license can be charged." 

"As soon as it is able to run on the streets it must have 
a tag." 

"Oh, dear, if I had to pay a license for each one of my 
dogs I wouldn't have any piD money." 

"How many have you?" 

"The old dog has ten puppies all big enough to run on 
the street, but I won't pay for all of them. I just wanted 
to talk to you anyway." 

"Of course you will permit me to call on you." 

"Why, certainly I should be delighted. Come up any 
time," and she gave her address. 

That afternoon Bonnet called, collected 122 dog tax and 
took his departure. The young lady has lost some of her 
interest in him. 

* # # 

Some people seem incapable of appreciating a conces- 
sion, the bestowal of a favor earning no gratitude and 
merely serving to whet the appetite for some further ad- 
vantage. This undesirable trait has been exemplified 
many times since the railroad companies made their great 



July 24. 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



reductions in excursion rates this month. Tourists bought 
tickets from Chicago to San Francisco at less than half 
the usual charge, dropped off at Los Angeles, and with 
a greedy desire to absorb every penny sold the unused 
portion "of the ticket to some one coming to this city. 
Scores of people tried to use these scalped tickets and 
many amusing incidents occurred in connection with the 
detection of these frauds. 

On the train from Los Angeles on Wednesday, a 
passenger presented the conductor a through ticket which 
had been sold at Chicago to J. H. Ferguson. 

•Is your name J. H. Ferguson?" asked the conductor. 

The passenger was positive of his own identification. 

"Please sign it," requested the conductor, who sus- 
pected a "scalp," and who wished to compare signatures. 

And then occurred a remarkable thingl The passenger 
became so nervous that he actually forgot how to spell his 
own name! He wrote it thus: 

J. A. Furgison. 

At the next station, "Mr. Furgison" was induced to buy 
a new ticket to conform with his amended appellation. 

* * # 

Having enjoyed an extended sojourn in the country, 
Hermann Oelrichs returned to town a few days ago, and 
in the evening dropped into the Orpbeum. Finding his 
cigar case empty, he summoned a waiter, who brought 
him two cigars in a paper bag. In the same receptacle 
was also a wooden cigar, an advertisement for a new 
brand. Oelrichs did not notice this third "cigar," but 
lighting one, transferred the wooden specimen to his case, 
and threw the bag with the genuine cigar on the floor. 
Soon afterwards he strolled out, and meeting Downey 
Harvey, proffered his cigar case. Downey accepted the 
wooden gift, and closed his teeth over it with a snap to 
bite off the wooden end. 

Harvey is still keeping engagements with his dentist, 
but he is waiting to even up on the innocent Oelrichs. 
What makes Downey so particularly sore is the repeated 
protestations of the New Yorker that he intended no 
practical joke. Harvey thinks that assertion magnifies 
his friend's offense from a misdemeanor to a felony. 

* * * 

A very hot morning in Los Angeles and a very thirsty 
man in the person of Webster Jones, who happened to be 
down that way, occasioned a brief stop in his career. Be- 
ing a man of discriminating tastes. Webster was unable 
to decide between a gin fizz and a John Collins, but finally 
determined to imbibe the latter beverage. He acted 
promptly on his resolution. 

"John Collins," he remarked, pleasantly, to the white- 
coated Los Angeleno, behind the bar, and smacked his lips 
in anticipation of the concoction. 

"No, sir," replied thedisappointed functionary, who had 
expected an order. "This house is run by John Eobinson. 
He's not in, but is there anything I can do for you?" 

* * * 

The last installment of Bohemians for the midsummer 
jinks will depart for Meeker's Grove this afternoon. But 
during the week the woods have been full of them. 
Charles Rollo Peters has a wigwam made altogether out 
of brush, and Solly Wolters has tacked a sort of platform 
to the lower limbs of a big redwood, to which he retires at 
night and hauls up his ladder after him. Paul, the Indian 
Prince, who always accompanies the van, shot a fine buck 
on Wednesday, and there was a royal feast. To-night the 
mysteries of the Hartz mountains will be reproduced, and 
care will be cremated with all due solemnity, High Priest 
Bromley leading the funeral procession. 

* * * 

The correspondents of the city papers who sail for 
Klondyke on the 28th will be Ned Hamilton and Charles 
Yale for the Examiner, Mr. Wall for the Call,. and the 
Chronicle men have not yet been decided upon. Mr. Ham- 
ilton's outfit is of a weird and startling nature. He has 
purchased a complete suit of bear skins, and a portable 
sled warranted to fit into an ordinary Gladstone. Nansen, 
in all the oddity of his North Pole wardrobe, won't be a 
rjatch upon Ned Hamilton in his Arctic suit. Louis Sloss, 
Jr., Edgar Mizner and his brother, and several other Bo- 
hemians are now in St. Michaels, and will hold a jinks when 
Hamilton and Yale arrive. 



Judge Henry S. Foote has discovered that being a 
Southern gentleman, sah, has its drawbacks. As United 
States Dlstrlot Attorney ft has been his duty to report 
annually to the Secretary of the Treasury on the financial 
responsibility of the bondsmen of Federal officials in his 
district. Among the officials was O. M. Welburn. Four 
years ago Mr. Welburn informed Judge Foote that Wil- 
liam P. Dougherty was one of his bondsmen. Judge Foote 
investigated, and, finding him all right, so reported. Judge 
Foote is himself too honorable a man to harbor a suspicion 
against a friend. As Welburn made no mention of any 
change in his bond, the District Attorney supposed none 
had been made, and annually repeated his first report to 
the Treasury. Imagine, then, his surprise a few days 
ago, when he was informed by Secretary Gage that Wil- 
liam P. Dougherty was, in point of fact, dead, and had 
been so for three years. This information so shocked 
Judge Foote that, up to the present writing he has been 
unable to comply with the urgent request of Secretary 
Gage for an explanation. 

» * * 

"There's only one thing missing in The Isle of Cham- 
pagne," said an Eastern theatrical man who was visiting 
the Tivoli, " and that's the popping of the corks. They 
went off like guns when Tommy Seabrooke played the part 
in New York — bona fide openings every night. Poor old 
Seabrooke! it was generally suspected that theMumm peo- 
ple subsidized him — their wine was opened in full view of 
the audience, and he downed it like a hero. He's a 
temperance man now. That experience in The Isle was as 
good as the gold cure. Ed Stevens, you see, takes no 
such chances with the divine thirst. You will notice there 
is no pop when the Mumm is uncorked here. The bottles 
are practically decanters, unsealed — they're loaded with 
Moet & Chandon, or some such brand of palatable inspira- 
tion: and Stevens plays the King as he was never played 
before, gets down to rehearsals at eleven sharp, and is 
considered a gilt-edged risk by life insurance agents." 

Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 

cures Po'son Oak and all skin diseases. The oldest and best remedy, 
which has cured thousands. At all druggists. 




jfcose. 



ffiubber, 
Cotton, 

jCinen. 



For Water, Steam, 
Suction, Gas, Air, 
and other purposes 



i 



GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY, 

E. H. PEASE, Vice-President and Manager. 
73-75 FIRST ST., 573-575-577-579 MARKET ST. 



Portland, Or. 



San Francisco. 



mmmmmmmmmmmMmmmmmmmwmmmmm.t 



SUMMER NOVELTIES 
JUST OPENED 



121 Montgomery St., 

Opposite Occidental Hotel. 



W. H. RAMSEY, 



Merchant 
Tailor. 



Williams Brothers. 
TAILORS. 



( Successors to Thomas 8. Williams) 



111 Sutter Street, Lick House Block 
San Francisco 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 24, 1897. 




THIS has been another dull week in town, though there 
:ne some signs manifested of returning interest in 
social life in the city. Theatre parties are again in evi- 
dence. 

Next week will be the last of the summer vacation, and 
the re-opening of the schools will bring a good many home 
from the country; still there is not much prospect of gaiety 
until country pleasures pall upon those who can stay away 
as loi g as their fancy inclines, and while the weather at 
the re.-orts is as pleasant as it has been of late, there is a 
likelihood of their guests remaining. 

One of the prettiest weddings of the summer took place 
at the French Church of Notre Dame des Victoires last 
week, when Miss Charlotte van der Naillen and Eugene 
East were united in marriage by the Rev. Father Gente 
in the presence of a large number of guests. The church 
was beautifully and elaborately dressed with flowers and 
tillage, and the music, both vocal and instrumental, was 
quite a feature. The pretty bride wore a robe of white 
duchesse satin trimmed with point lace and chiffon, a vail 
of white silk moleine, which was held in place by a spray 
of orange blossoms, and her bouquet was of bride's roses. 
Miss Rene van der Naillen, who officiated as maid-of-honor, 
was gowned in blue mou$$elim </• toie over blue silk, and 
she carried a cluster of Cecil Bruner roses. There were 
four bridesmaids — Miss Anna Gtozeillier, who wore pink 
silk; Miss Regina East, lavender silk: Miss Fanny de 
Boom, pink silk and white crepon, and Miss Ophelia Wied- 
enmuller light blue silk; and all carried bouquets of sweet 
peas. There were also two little maidens who wore blue 
and pink, respectively . and scattered flowers for the bride 
to tread upon. Frank East was his brother's best man, 
and Messrs. Gunst, Wiedenmuller, East and C. T. Rvland 
officiated as ushers. A small reception was held at the 
home of the bride's parents on Post street after the church 
service, followed by supper, and the happy pair have been 
spending their honeymoon at Coronado. Another of July's 
pretty weddings took place at the California Hotel, when 
Mi>s Lizzie Hall, of Redwood City, was the bride and W. P. 
McCoy the groom. 

There was a wedding in Berkeley on Tuesday evening 
last, which had one unusual feature, the mother of the bride 
tying the nuptial knot which united Miss Jessie Naylor and 
Elmer E. Cole in marriage, Mrs. Naylor being the pastor 
of the Berkeley Quaker Church. The ceremony took 
place at the home of the bride on Dwight Way. underneath 
a canopv formed of pink and white roses and dahlias; 
the other decorations of the room in white were extremely 
pretty and artistic. The bride wore a gown of white 
organdie and a tulle vail, and carried a bouquet of sweet 
peas. Miss Elizabeth Cole performed the duties of maid- 
of-honor, and young Nichol officiated as best man. Supper 
was served in the dining-room, which was decorated in 
pink, relatives and intimate friends only being present. 

An August wedding is already upon tne tapis, the par- 
ties thereat to be Miss Libbie Moffitt and Ernst Folger, 
whose engagement has just been announced, and while it 
will be an Oakland ceremonial, San Francisco society will 
benefit thereby: the young couple have so many friends on 
le of the bay who are sure to be present'at the nup- 
tials. Another wedding likely to take place in the near 
future is that of Miss Sadie Samuels and Isaac Foorman, 
one of whose engagement receptions was held at the Sam- 
uel residence, on Octavia street, on Wednesday, and an- 
other will be held to-morrow. 

On last Saturday evening at the home of the In 
brother-in-law, W. E. Schwerin. in Alameda, Miss Freda 
Eaehler of that place was united in marnage to James M. 
Shanlcy of Oakland, Rev. Hobart Chetwood of this city 
officiating. The bridesmaids were the bride's nieces, the 
Misses Josie Schwerin and Freda Eaehler, Everett 



Dowdle of Oakland and Thomas Bennet of Alameda acted 
as groomsmen. 

The engagement is announced of S. Wolf of New York 
and Miss Blanche Fleischacker. 

The paper chasers had a most successful run last Sat- 
urday. Miss Emma Hunt and Sam Boardman were the 
hares, and Miss Addie Moffitt and F. A. Howard, both of 
Oakland, were the winners of the prizes. There will be 
another one to-day, but the chase of next week is the one 
arousing most interest, as the Ingleside prize cups will be 
competed for then, and 'tis said a number from Burlin- 
game will enroll themselves among the hounds for that 
day, with a dance at the Hotel Rafael in the evening. 
There is no dirth of amusement at the hotel. What with 
entertainments, paper chases, and impromptu parties, the 
guests of this popular summer home pass the time de- 
lightfully. 

To-night the members of the Bohemian Club will assem- 
ble in force for their mid-summer jinks, which will be held 
at their grounds amid the redwoods in Marin County. 
Mr. H. J. Stewart will act as Sire of the High Jinks, the 
feature of which will be the presentation of scenes from 
Faint, and lovers of fun are assured of plenty of that arti- 
cle at Low Jinks, which will be under the direction of 
George T. Bromley. 

Fishing parties appear to be quite a fad at our summer 
resorts at present, and wonderful tales of "catches" are 
related bj' anglers. Salmon is the tish at Monterey, and 
at Lake Tahoe trout is much sought. There are quite a 
number of San Franciscans at the Lake this summer, 
among late arrivals being the William Gerstles, Downey 
Harvey and family. Mrs. B. B. Cutter, Miss Hecht, Mrs. 
W. W. Willis, Miss India Scott, Miss Adele Martel, etc. 

Castle Crags is by no means behind in merry making, 
and the guests there are untiring in search of original 
amusements. Private theatricals are favorite means of 
passing the evening, and, since the arrival of the Darlings 
and Mrs. Blanding Coleman, music has been abundant and 
good. The Misses Kip are great favorites, and are al- 
ways ready to join in what is going on. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Newball have carried their house 
around with them during their vacation — i. e., living on 
board the yacht Virginia at Sausalito, and on it making 
frequent trips, accompanied by parties of friends. 

Mrs. J. D. Spreckels is comfortably settled at Coro- 
nado. where she will pass several weeks; her party of ten 
includes Mrs. and Miss Mangels. 

The serious illness and then the death of Colonel Fred 
Crocker cast deep gloom over the whole neighborhood of 
San Mateo and Burlingame, at the latter place all sports 
and amusements arranged to take place being postponed, 
while grief at his untimely taking off has been sincere and 
wide-spread. 

Next month, though possibly not until September, we 
shall be called upon to welcome Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sharon 
who, having taken an "apartment'' in Paris with the inten- 
tion of making that gay city their home for several years 
to come, will pay San Francisco a visit d'adit h before set- 
tling down. Recent arrivals here include Mrs. W. L. El- 
kins of Philadelphia (»'•■ Katie Felton) with her children 
and aunt, Mrs. George Loomis. C. N. Felton was also of 
her party, and they purpose remaining in California until 
autumn. 

Mr. and Mrs." Leonard Everett, n(e Estee, are occupying 
their new home at 1908 Bakerstreet, where Mrs. Everett's 
reception days will be the third and fourth Wednesdays 
of the month. 

At lake Tahoe are quite a number of San Franciscans, 
among them being the Sachs family, the Neustadters, and 
Arthur Bachman and his sister. Mr. and Mrs. C. W. 
Rosenbaum. and the Hellers of New York. 



S GREAT many who take their own rigs over to San 
Rafael find superior accommodations at the stable 
under the management of C. F. Ackley. The stock at the 
stable (which is connected with the Hotel Rafael) is of an 
excellent quality, the horses being frequently ridden in 
the paper chases, which are an attractive feature of out- 
door sport at that place. 



July 24. 1897. 
BIN A FISHIN 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



-.• tveu: « rut nisii cirr nu. 



Many 1 Urn. when 'twas gittin' late, 

•i-ed him a-sru'akiT) thru' ther gate, 
Throwin' back'ards an anxious glai. 
At a jagged tear in the back o' his pants. 
He'd bin fisbin'. 

Then he'd slide his pole, a crookedy lim'. 
Dp ii the roof of the old wood bin. 
An' ther bait he'd left in Iher tomato can 
He'd hide, an' say ter me. " Hello, Pan, 
I've bin Bsliin'." 

He'd hurry an' give ther " minDies " ter ma, 
Afore she'd have a chance ter jaw 
About him a-leavin' o' his hoe, 
An* allowin' o' ther weeds ter grow. 
While he'd bin fisbin'. 

Then he'd say as he "was hungry an' dry, 
An' 'ud like some milk an' a piece o' pie." 
Ma 'd say, '■ You kin hush an' go ter bed 
For supper is over, an' ther table red. 
You just go a-fishin'." 

An' when he was offupstairs, why, pa 
'I'd fidget, an' grin, an' say ter ma, 
Now, mother; don't be hard; he's a little chap, 
An' many a time I've left my pap, 
An' gone a-tishin'." 

Then pa 'ud go ter bed, with a wink at me, 
Fur we both o' us knew just how 'twould be, 
An' mother 'ud take some milk an' pie, 
An' steal upstairs a sorter sly ; 
As if she'd bin a-fishin'. 



4000 DUELS A YEAR IN GERMANY. 



M ORE duels are fought in Germany than in any other 
1 1 country. Most of them, however, are student duels, 
which culminate in nothing more serious than slashed 
cheeks or tore scalps. Fully four thousand student duels 
are fought every year in the German Empire. 

In addition to these there the are more serious duels be 
tween officers and civilians. Among Germans of mature 
years the annual number of duels is about one hundred. 

Next to Germany, Prance is most given to the dueling 
habit. She has every year uncounted meetings, "merely 
to satisfy honor; " that is, merely to give two men the 
opportunity to wipe out insults by crossing swords or firing 
pistols in such a way as to preclude the slightest chance 
of injury. In the duel statistics these meetings are not 
reckoned, as they are far less perilous than even the Ger- 
man student duels. 

Of the serious duels France can boast fully one thousand 
from New Year's to New Year's. The majority of these 
are among army officers. More than half of these result 
in wounds; nearly twenty per cent, in serious wounds. 

Italy has had 2759 duels in the last ten years, and has 
lost fifty citizens by death on the field of honor. Some 
two thousand four hundred of these meetings were consum- 
mated with sabers, one hundred and seventy-nine with pis- 
tols, ninety with rapiers, and one with revolvers. In nine 
hundred and seventy-four cases the insult was given in 
newspaper articles or public letters regarding literary 
quarrels. Political discussions led to five hundred and 
fifty-nine, religious discussions to twenty-nine. Women 
were the cause of one hundred and eighty-nine. Quarrels 
at the gambling table were responsible for one hundred 
and eighty-nine. 

A summary shows that, as regards numbers, the se- 
quence of dueling contries is: Germany, Prance, Italy, 
Austria, Russia. As regards deadliness of duels, Italy 
comes first; then come Germany, Prance, Russia, and 
Austria in the order named. For the most serious duels 
the pistol is the favorite weapon in all five countries. 

In giving entertainments the cbief responsibility for success is in 
the table. The feast's the thing. Max Abraham, the popular 
caterer at 428 Geary street, is prepared on a moment's notice to get 
up banquets, dinners and suppers and guarantees perfect satisfaciion. 



Great Reduction in prices during the summer months on Art Goods, 
Pictures, Crookery, Glassware, etc S. & G. Gump. 113 Geary street. 



$1000.op 

Schilling } s Best tea is good. 
So is that $1000. 
Have some of both ? 



Jackson's Napa Soda is a gentle aperient. 



* PACIFIC 
CONGRESS 
SPRINGS 

1 HOTEL 



Remodeled and under 
New Management .... 

Onlij two-and-a-half hours 
from San francisco. 

Six miles from Los Gatos. Ten 
miles from SaDta (Jlara. Twelve 
miles from San Jose. 
For rates and printed matter address 



I Santa Cruz Mountains, 

k, Santa Clara County. 

M 



JOHN S, MATHES0N, 

Manager 



VlGliy Springs. 



Three Miles from 
UKIAH. 



Terminus of S. F. &. N. P. Railway 

Mendocino County 

The only place in the United States where Vichy Water is abundant, Only 
natural electric waters. Champagne baths. The only place in the world 
of this class of waters where the bathtubs are supplied by a continuous 
flow of natural warm water direct from the springs- Accommodations 
first class. 

Miss D. D. Alien. Prop. 



Blutnedale 



NOW OPEN. Hotel and Cottages 



A pretty California spot on line of Mt Tamalpais Scenic Railway. 
Carriage meets all trains at Mill Valley. Five minutes' drive. 

Mrs. Gregg. 



Under New 
Management 



^_BWJE LAKES HOTEL, 



Only 19 miles from Ukiah. 

Finest summer resort in California. 

Good hunting, fishing, boating, and Bathing. 

Finest cuisine and best accommodations. 



(Bertha Postofflce) 
LAKE COUNTY, CAL. 



R. E. WHITEFIELD, 

Manager. 



N. E. corner Van Ness and Myrtle arenues. 



The principal and finest family hotel in San Francisco. ' T"L nU I CL 
HOTEL RICHELIEU CO. RICHELIEU 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth 
Patches, Rash, and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on b> auty, and defies de- 
tection It has stood the test of 48 years 
and is so harmless v e taste it to be sure 
it is properlv made Accept no counter- 
feit of similar name. Dr. L. A Sayre 
said to a lady of the haut-ton (a pa- 
tient): "'As you ladies will use them. I 
recommend 'Gouraud's Cream' as the 
least harmful of all the Skin prepara- 
tions," For sale by all Druggists and 
Fancy-Goods Dealers in the United 
States, Canadas, and Europe 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r, 

37 Great Jones St ,N.Y. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 24, 1897. 



NOTES OF THE ARMY AND NAVY. 



The beneficial effect of the removal of the gigantic sys- 
tem of red tape in military affairs and the application of 
common-sense methods was aptly illustrated in the recent 
examination for promotion of Captain Tasker H. Bliss, 
U. S. A. He was the first officer to be examined under 
the new order, and the examination lasted but two hours. 
Under the old order it would have taken from ten days to 
two weeks. Under the present system a line officer's 
examination can be completed in two days and the decision 
rendered. 

The Secretary of War has received a communication 
from the Commercial Club of Walla Walla soliciting him to 
order two troops of cavalry to Fort Walla Walla to take 
the places of those recently removed to Fort Yellowstone. 

One set of officers' quarters and one barracks for the 
enlisted men are to be erected by the Marine Corps at the 
Puget Sound Naval Station at a cost of $18,000. 

The Oregon returned from Seattle last Sunday night, 
and is anchored off Sausalito. 

Rear Admiral Lester A. Beardslee, U. S. N., will re- 
tire from active service next February, and until then no 
vacancy will occur in the grade of Rear Admiral. Com- 
modore C. S. Norton, U. S. N., will probably succeed him. 

Commodore R. L. Pythian, U. S. N., was retired from 
active service last Wednesday. His successor as Superin- 
tendent of the Naval Observatory is Commander Charles 
H. Davis, U. S. N. 

Commander Uriel Sehree, U. S. N., has been detached 
from the command of the Thetis and ordered to duty with 
the Wheeling. 

Captain G. W. Sumner, U. S. N., is now Captain of the 
New York Navy Yard. 

Major General Thomas H. Ruger, U. S. A., is passing 
the season at Delaware Water Gap, Penn. 

The case of Lieutenant Colonel Henry E. Noyes, U. S. 
A., has been settled by the adverse report of the Senate 
Committee on his nomination to the rank of Colonel. 
Hence the other cavalry nominations now pending will 
soon be passed upon. 

Major John G. Ramsay, Fifth Artillery, U. S. A., has 
been assigned to duty at Fort Hamilton, N. Y. 

Lieutenant F. H. Lefavor, U. S. N., has been ordered 
to the Wheeling as executive officer. 

Lieutenant John K. Cree, Third Artillery, U. S. A., has 
been granted one month's leave of absence, to take effect 
on August 1st. 

Lieutenant George W. Van Deusen, First Artillery, 
U. S. A., and his family are at Ho.usatonie, Berkshire 
County, Mass. 

Lieutenant H. George, U. S. N., has been detached from 
the Thetis and ordered to the Independence. 

Lieutenant A. W. Dodd, U. S. N., has been detached 
from the Thetis and ordered to the Monadnock. 

Lieutenant C. A. Clarke, U. S. N., has been ordered to 
the Adams. 

Lieutenant Charles B. Satterlee, Third Artillery, U. S. 
A., has been granted six months' leave of absence with per- 
mission to leave the Department of California. 

Lieutenant T. L. Ames, Third Artillery, U. S. A., now 
on a leave of absence, has recently been visiting friends in 
Chicago. 

Captain G. W. Crabb, Fifth Artillery, U. S. A., now on 
sick leave, and his family are residing at Fort Hamilton, 
N. Y. 

Captain Francis J. Higginson, U. S. N., has been 
ordered to command the battleship Massachusetts. 

Captain Allen Smith, Fourth Cavalry, U. S. A., has 
been granted one months' leave of absence with permission' 
to apply for an extension of one month. 

Passed Assistant Engineer G. W. McElroy, U. S. N., 
has been detached from the Adams, ordered home and 
granted two month's leave of absence. 

Passed Assistant Engineer W. B. Day, U. S. N., has 
been detached from the navy yard at New York and 
ordered to the Adams. 

Lieutenant Robert E. Peary, U. S. N, left Boston last 
Monday for Greenland to make preliminary arrangements 
for his proposed endeavor to reach the North Pole next 
year. Mrs. Peary accompanied him. 



Passed Assistant Surgeon S. S. White, U. S. N, has 
been detached from the Thetis and ordered to Sitka, 
Alaska, as the relief of Passed Assistant Surgeon A. R. 
Alfred, U. S. N., who has been ordered home and granted 
two months' leave of absence. 

Assistant Paymaster John Irwin Jr., U. S. N., has 
been detached from the Thetis, settle accounts and ordered 
to be ready for sea duty. 

The Monadnock left Eureka, Cal., on Thursday for this 
city. The officers have been very pleasantly entertained 
by the citizens there while in port. 

Rear Admiral J. N. Miller, U. S. N, will arrive here 
next month and sail for Honolulu August 7 th. He will 
then assume command of the Pacific Squadron, relieving 
Rear Admiral Lester A. Beardslee, U. S. N, and will use 
the Philadelphia as his flagship until the arrival of the 
Baltimore, when the Philadelphia will proceed to the Mare 
Island Navy Yard to undergo repairs. 

Captain Frank de L. Carrington, First Infantry, U. S. 
A., will instruct the National Guard in battle movements 
while it is in camp at Camp Shatter in Santa Cruz. 

Lieutenant Luigi Lomia, Fifth Artillery, U. S. A., has 
been granted two months' leave of absence. 

The Bennington is under orders to proceed to Pearl Har 
bor, Hawaiian Islands, with equipments for making the 
survey authorized by Congress for establishing a naval 
coaling station. The appropriation for this purpose was 
$10,000. This is in line with the presumed idea of annexa- 
tion. Although orders have not been issued at this time 
of writing, it is supposed that the Oregon will soon go to 
Honolulu. 

Mrs. J. G. Foster Moale, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. 
Black Ryan, of Menlo Park, died at the Occidental Hotel 
last Wednesday of consumption. She is a daughter-in- 
law of Colonel Edward Moale, Third Infantry, U. S. A., 
and sister-in-law of Ensign Edward Moale, U. S. N. 

Mrs. Kate M. Godfrey, wife of Surgeon John Godfrey, 
U. S. M. H. S., died at the Marine Hospital here last 
Wednesday morning of pneumonia after an illness of one 
week. 

Don't Worry Yourself 
and don't worry the baby ; avoid both unpleasant conditions by giv- 
ing the child pure, digestible food. Don't use solid preparation?. 
TnfantBealth Isa valuable pamphlet for mothers. Send your address 
to the New York Condensed Milk Company, New York. 



J. F. Cutter whiskey is the gentleman's drink. It is recognized 
as a pure, invigorating liquor and is found ir. every first-class bar. 
It is as staple as bread and in every gallon of it is imprisoned whole- 
some and life-giving qualities. E. Martin * Co.. 411 Market street, 
are sole Pacific Coast Agents. 



Indigestion dies where Jackson's Napa Soda lives. 

dOHN D. SULLIUAN 

Attorney-at- Law 
Rooms 34-38, 3d Floor Chronicle Building, San Francisco. 

DR. BYRON W. HAINES 



14 Grant Avenue 
Rooms 16-17-18-19 



Dentist 



over "Gity of Par 



DR. ARTHUR T. REGENSBURGER, 
Dentist, 

Office and Residence, 4094 Post street, San Francisco. 

Office Hours, 9 to 12 a . m. ; 1 to 5 r m. Telephone Clay 84 

Dr. F. G. PAGUE 

Dervtist 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy or Sciences Building, 819 Market street 

DRS. DERBY & WINTER, Dentists, 

Or Aft KEARNY STREET, removed to Room S3, Flood Build- 
ing. Market and Fourth Streets 
Telephone, Clay 301 . 



July 24, 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



By I^ail, Boat and Sta^e. 



Southern Pacific Co. --Pacific System. 



Train* Leave and are Due to Arrive at SAN 


FRANCISCO: 


Imn. 1 From July l, 1897. 


I Arrive 



•8:00 A Niles. San Jose, and way stations 

7:00 a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East 8:45 p 

7:00 a Beniclo, Sacramento, Orovtlle, and Redding, via Davis 5:45 p 

7:00 a Vacaville nnd Rumsey 8:45 P 

7:30 a Martinet. San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa. Calls toga. Santa Rosa 0:15 p 
0:90a N'iles, San Jose, Stockton. lone, Sacramento, Marysville, 

Chico. Tehama, and Red Bluff 4:15 p 

•8:30 a Peters, Milton, and Oakdale *7:15p 

6:00a New Orleans Express, Merced. Fresno, Bakersfleld, Santa 
Barbara, Los Angeles, Deming, El Paso, New Orleans, and 

East 6:15 P 

0: 00 a Vallejo 12 :15 P 

Nlles, San Jose Llvermore, and Stockton 7:15P 

•1:00 p Sacramento River steamers *9:00P 

1:00 p N lies, San Jose, and Llvermore 8:45 a 

1:30 p Martinez and Way Stations 7:45p 

4:O0p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Calls toga, El Verano 

and Santa Rosa. 9:15 A 

4:00p Benicia, Winters. Woodland, Knight's Landing, Marys- 
ville. Oroville. and Sacramento 10:15 A 

4:30 p Lathrop. Stockton, Modesto, Merced, Raymond (for Yosem- 

lte) and Fresno, going via Niles, returning via Martinez.. 13:15 p 
5:00 p Los Angeles Express, Tracy, Fresno, Mojave (for Rands- 
burg), Santa Barbara, and Los Angeles 7.45a 

5:00p Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, for Mojave and East.... 6:15 p 

6:0U p European mall, Ogden and East 10:15 a 

6 :00 p Hay wards , Niles and San Jose 7 :45 A 

J8:00p Vallejo f?:45P 

8:00 P Oregon Express, Sacramento, Marysville, Redding, Port- 
land, Puget Sound and East 7:45A 

San Leasdro and Hatwabds Local. (Foot of Market St.) 



••6-00 Al 
8:00 A 


Melrose, 


f 7:15 A 


Seminary Park, 


£9:45 A 


9:00 A 


Fitchburg, 


10:45 A 


10 :00 a 


Elmhurst. 


11:45 A 


ill .00 A 


San Leandro. 


12:45 P 


112:00 h 


South San Leandro, 


(1:45 p 


3:00 p 


ESTUDIT.LO, 


J2:45 P 


£3:00 p 


Lorenzo, 


4:45 P 


4:00 P 


Cherry, 


(5:45 p 


5:00 P 


and 


6:15 P 


5:30 P 


Haywardb. 


7:45 P 


7:00 P 




8:45 P 


8:00 P 


i Runs through to Nlles. 


9:45 P 


9:00 P 


t From Niles . 


10:50 P 


ttll:15P 




ltH2:O0 P 



Santa Cruz Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

17:45A Santa Cruz Excursion, Santa Cruz & principal way stations J8:05p 

8:15 A Newark, Centervllle, San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 5 :50 p 

•2 :15 p Newark, Centervllle, San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations *10:5ua 

4 :15 p San Jose and Glenwood 9 :21 > 

14:15 p Felton and Santa Cruz g9;20A 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— *7:15, 9:00, and 
11 :00 a. u., tl :00, *2 :00, 13:00. *4 :00, J5 :00 and *6 :00 p. M. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway .— *6:00, 8:00, 10:00 A. M.; tl2:00, *1:00, 
t2:00,*3:00, J4:00 *5:00 p. M. 

Coast Division (Third and Townsend streets). 

•7:00 A 

J7:30A 



15 P 
45A 
:*5p 



05A 
:45A 



San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesdays only) 1 
Sunday excursion for San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, 

and principal way stations J8 

u :uu a San Jose, Tres Ptnos, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Paso Robles 

San Luis Obispo, Guadalupe, Surf and prinoipalway stations 4 

10:40 a San Jose and way stations 9 

11 :30 a Palo Alto and way stations 5 

*2:80p San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Santa Clara, San Jose, 
Gilroy, Hollister, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, Pacific 

Grove *10: 

•8 :30 P San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove and way stations *7 

*4 :30 P San Jose and Way Stations *8 

5 :30 p San Jose and principal -way stations *8 

6 :30 p San Jose and way stations 6 :a& a 

fll :45p San Jose and way stations t 7 :3Q p 

A for Morning, p for Afternoon. *Sundays excepted. fSaturdays only. 

JSundays only. tt Monday, Thursday, and Saturday nights only. 

^Saturdays and Sundays. gSundays and Mondays. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will oall for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and 
other Information. 

mAnonH ParifiV 306 Stockton St. San Francisco. 
Ul dllU lUOlUbi MRS. ELLA CORBETT, Proprietress. 
Furnished rooms by the day. week, or month. Telephone : Grant. 507. 



San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. TlBDRON FERRY- Foot ol Market Street. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:30, 9:00, 11 :U0 am; 12:35, 3:30 5:10, 6:30 p m. Thursdays— 
Extra trip at 11:30 P M. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :50 and 11:80 p M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00,9:30. 11:00 A M: 1:30 3:30, 5:00. 6:20 P M. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:10, 7:50, 9:20, 11:10 am; 12:45,3:40,5:10pm. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1:65 and 6:35 p m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40. 11:10 am; 1:40,3:40,6:00,6:25pm. 

Between San Francisco and Scuuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave 


S. F. 


In Effect June 13, 1897 


Arrive in S. F. 


Week Days. 


Sundays. 


Destination. 


Sundays 

10:40 am 
6:10 pm 
7:35 pm 


Week Days 


7:30am 
3:30pm 
5:10pm 


8:00 am 
9:30am 
5:00pm 


Novato, 
Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa. 


8:40 AH 
10:25 AM 
6 :22 p M 


7:30am 
3:30 pm 


8:00 am 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyservllle. Cloverdale 


7:35PM 


10:25 A H 
8:22 p H 


7:30 am 
3:30 pm 


8:00 AM 


Eopland, Ukiah 


7:35 pm 


10:25 AM 
6:22 p M 


7:30am 
3:30pm 


8:00 AM 


Guernevllle. 


7:35PM 


10:25 A H 
6:22 P H 


7:30 AM 
5:10pm 


8:00 am 
5:00 pm 


Sonoma, 

Glen Ellen. 


10:40 AH 
6:10PM 


8:40 A H 
6:22 P U 


7:30am 
3:30pm 


8:00am 
5:00pm 


Sevastopol. | »jgAj | 10* A M 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs; at Geyservllle 
for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport, and Bartlett Springs; at 
Ukiah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Laurel Del 
Lake, "Upper Lake, Porno, Potter Valley, John Day's, Riverside, Lier- 
ley's, Buoknell's Sashedoin Heights, Hullville, Booneville, Orr's Hot 
Springs , Mendocino City, Ft. Bragg. Westport, Usal. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets atreduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 

TICKET OFFICE-650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 
A. W. FOSTER, Pres. & Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass . Agent. 

Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 

Steamers leave Broadway Wharf, San Francisco for ports in Alaska, 
9 a. m.. July 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and every 5th day thereafter. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports, 9 A. M., July 5, 10, 15, 
20, 25, 30, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), Steamer "Pomona," at 2 p.m. July 5, 9, 
13, 17. 21, 26, 30 ; Aug. 3, 7. 11, 16. 20, 24, 23; Sept. 1, 6, 10, 14, 18. 22, 27. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, at 9 a.m.; July 1, 5, 9, 13, 
17. 21, 25, 29, and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford Santa Barbara, Port Los 
Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles) and Newport, 11 a. m., July 3, 7, 11. 15, 
19, 23 27, 31 and every fourth day thereafter. 

For Ensenada, Magdalena Bay, San Jose del Cabo, Mazatlan, Altata. La 
Paz Santa Rosalia, and Guaymas (Mexico), steamer "Orizaba," 10 A. m., 
the 2d of each month. 

The company reserves the right to change, without previous notice, 
steamers, sailing dates, and hours of sailing . 

Ticket Office— Palace Hotel, No. 4 New Montgomery street. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 10 Market st.S. F. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p M., for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, 

calling at Kobe (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at 

Hongkong with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on 

day of sailing. 

Doric (via Honolulu) Tuesday. July 27, 1897 

Belgic Saturday, August 14, 1897 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday, September 2, 1897 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, September 21. 1897 

Round Trip tickets at reduced rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street, 
corner First. D. D. STUBBS, Secretary. 

S. S. "Moana," Thursday, July 22d, at 2 P M 

S S "Australia", for Honolulu only, Tuesday, 

August 10th. at 2 p m. 

Line to Coolgardle, Australia, and Capetown, 

South Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS &RROS. CO., 
Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight office, 337 
Market St.. San Francisco. 



[AN!£ 




©npna- 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Alpha Con. Milt and Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 19 

Amount per Share 10 cente 

Levied July 8,1897 

Delinquent in Office August 12, 1897 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 2, 1897 

CHARLES E. ELLIOT, Secretary- 
Office: Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

Weak Jlen and Women gSg,!r fI 5tfffiSit.5£: 

edy ; it gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 828 Mar- 
ket street, San Francisco. (Send for circular. ) 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 

Estate of JAMES S. BENNET, Deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, A. C Freese : Administrator 
of the estate of James S Bennet, deceased, to the creditors of, and all per- 
sons having claims against the said deceased, to exhibit them, with the 
necessary vouchers, within four months after the first publication of this 
notice, to the said Administrator, at room 35. Chronicle building, corner 
Geary andKearny streets, San Francisco, Cal., the same being his place 
for the transaction of the business of the said estate in the City and 
County of San Francisco, State of California. 

A. C. FREESE, Administrator of the Estateof James S. Bennet, Deceased. 
J. D. Sullivan, Attorney for the Administrator. 
Dated at San Francisco, July 2, 1897. 



24 



iAN FRAXCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 24, 1897. 



INSURANCE 

THE Agricultural,' the Plicnix at Brooklyn, and the 
Niagara Fire, which left the Coast during the recent 
unpleasantness, will probably return and open for business 
here this monlh. 

J. J. McDonald, manager of the Western department of 
the Continental, has appointed A A Maloney as-istant to 
State Agent Graves in the management of that company's 
California business, with headquarters in L >s Angeles. 

The Alliance Fire people will move into their new build- 
ing on California street next month. 

The Union Central Life has m >ved from 303 California 
street to northwest corner of Montgomery and California 
streets. 

The Provident Savings Life will occupy offices in the 
new Spreckels Building. 

J. N. Priest and J. N. Russell Jr.. Vice-President and 
Secretary of the Bankers' Mutual Life of Denver, are in 
the city. 

D. F. Appel, Superintendent of Agencies of the North- 
east Mutual Life, is visiting California. 

The Sun Insurance Office of London is the oldest purely 
fire insurance company iu the world, having been founded 
in 1710. Its net fire surplus is 16,617,787. 

An effort is being made by the Chicago tire underwriters 
to control the fire business of Montana. That Slate has 
always been under the jurisdiction of the Coast depart- 
ment, and naturally Coast managers are making a vigor- 
ous fight against the Winch City manipulators. 

The recent attempt of a San Jose firm, instigated by 
non-boarders, to wreck the business of the Lancashire Fire 
at that place, was met by coast managers Mann & Wilson 
with a change of agency and a cut of ninety per cent, all 
round in rates. 

Secretary Francis, of the Mutual Fire of New York, 
has transferred the management of that company from 
Bertbeau & Folger, and placed it with Davis & Henry. 

The Pacific Underwriter has issued a chart showing the 
progress of the companies dointr business on this Coast for 
several years, which is of value to fire underwriters. 

The Supreme Court of this State holds J. N, E. Wilson 
responsible to the amount ol SL'i'.iio for moneys belonging 
to the State, and deposited by him while Insurance Com- 
ner with the Pacific Bank. 

C. A. Henry and B. L Davis have formed a partner- 
ship to represent the National Standard and the Assur- 
ance Company of New York, both recently admitted to 
this State: and also the Mutual Fire. 

Clarence M. Smith, of the Northwestern Mutual Life, is 
attending the annual convention of the general agents or 
his company in Milwaukee. 

The Prussian companies debarred from doing business 
in New York by the retaliatory laws of that State, are 
struggling to get back. 

F. Boye, Coast manager of the Svea Fire, with head- 
quarters at Gothenburg, visited Brown & Son, his Coast 
agents here this month. 

Manager Rolla V. Watt, of the Royal and Queen, will 
move into the old Pacific Bank building, on the corner of 
Sansome and Pine streets, on September 1st. This prop- 
erty was a short time ago purchased by the Royal. 

The New Zealand Insurance Company, which has con- 
fined its United States business to this Coast, contem- 
plates extending its field to include all American territory. 

The stockholders of the Preferred Accident reci 
contributed 112 to the surplus of the Company. 

Thomas S. Chard, manager of the Fireman's fund's cen- 
tral department, has just celebrated the 21st anniver- 
sary of his connection with the company. 



$25 Rate to Chicago via the Great Santa Fe Route. 
The low rates made (or Christian Bndeavorera will be open to die 
public as well, If they travel Tia the Great Santa F. 1: lute. Ticket 
Office, 644 Market street, Chronicle Building Tel. Main 1531. 

Bromo Kola cures headaches, neuralgia, and nervous troubles. 



Jackson's Napa Sola lemonade is a luxury. Try it. 
Dsbcham'-, Pills cure Sick Headach.. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Fire and Marine Insurance Agents, 

309 and 311 Sansome St. - - - - San Francisco, Ca 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

FINDLAY, DURHAM & BRODIE 48 and 4o Threadneedle St., London 

SIMPSON, M ACKIRDY & CO 29 South Castle St., Liverpool 

INSURANCE. 

FIRE. MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

Firemans Fund 

INSURANCE COMPANY, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Capital, $1,000,000. 



Assets, $3,500,000. 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited), OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

SOLID SECURITY. OVER $9,000,000.00 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager 489 California St., S. F. 
Fire Insurance. 

Founded A. D. 1799. 

Insurance Company ol North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA. PENN. 

Paid-up Capital 88,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 6,022,018 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. F. 

CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 

Capital Paid Up 11,000.000 

Assets 3,300.01 8 

Surplus to Policy Holders 1,088,332 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager 501 Montgomery St. 

B. J. Smith, Assistant Manager. 

BOYD & DICKSON, S. F. Agents, 501 Montgomery St 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE CO. OF LONDON Established its. 
PROVIDENCE-WASHINGTON NSURANCE CO. incorporated «• 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Oeneral Agents, 

418 California St., S. F. 



BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO., 


LIMITED, 




OF LIVERPOOL. 




Capital 




18,700,000 




BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 






No. 318 California St., S. F 



THE THURINGIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Of ERFURT. GERMANY. 
Capital (2.230 000 Assets, tl0,t84.M8 
Pacific Coast Department 2 4-208 SANSOME ST., S. F 

VOSS. CONRAD& CO.. General Managers 

TUC I I DM FIRE INSURANCE CO . Limited, of London. 

nc LIUI1 Total cash assets In United States, *88.,7(<T (r.r 

INSURANCE CO Limited, of Londc 

E-tahlished on Pacific Coast In l^.v.' 

WILLIAM .1 I.ANDERS Resident Manager 

Pacific Coast Branch: 275-207 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal, 



I 



Price per Copy. 10 Cents. 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 




s*n r *#^»»eo 




(tfalif xrrmlfjCata xtx sjer. 




Vol.LV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 31, 1897. 



Number 5. 



Printed and Published entry Saturday by the proprietor, FRED MABBI0T7 
b% Kearny street, San Francisco. Entered at San Francisco Post- 
office as Second-class Matter. 

The office of the NEWS LETTER in New Tort City is at Temple Court; 
and at Chicago. 903 Boycs Building. (Frank E. Morrison, Eastern 
Representative), where information may be obtained regarding subscrip- 
tion and advertising rates. 



SOME of the jurors in the Craven-Fair case have ex- 
pressed a desire to brave the court's contempt and 
fly to the Kiondyke. No such determination has escaped 
the lawyers' lips. They know a mine when they see it. 

SUPERVISOR Bntt is greatly exercised lest some of 
the city's employees should work overtime, and intro- 
duced a resolution at the last Board meeting, warning the 
contractors that eight hours constitute a day's work on 
municipal improvements; and that a failure to observe 
this fact might void their contracts. The time put in by 
those on the city pay-roll is very much less than eight 
hours; and it is fair to assume that the average employee 
knows his rights, and would make complaint if he were 
over-worked. This solicitude for the workingman, upon 
the part of Mr. Britt, is pathetic, and illustrates very 
forcibly how delightful a thing it is to be generous with 
other people's money. 

THE California delegation to the Trans-Mississippi 
Congress at Salt Lake were especially requested by 
the Manufacturers' and Producers' Association to go on 
record as opposing the export into this State of convict 
made goods from surrounding territory, but it appears 
that some of the delegates objected to the introduction of 
that subject. It is known that quantities of these goods 
are brought into California, and that they crowd out 
similar products of local manufacture. What reason any 
one not in the penitentiary could advance for thus prac- 
tically favoriDg the output of convict labor in other States, 
and its sale in California, constitutes the eighth wonder 
of the world. 



INSURANCE Commissioner Clume has aroused a great 
deal of interest in insurance circles by demanding a 
more complete statement of the methods of transacting 
business by the companies than has been customary. 
There is no doubt that there is cause for Clunie's rather 
unexpected circular; but the Commissioner is more than 
justified in directing periinent inquiry toward a matter in 
which the people generally have a very great personal in- 
terest. The statements of some of the companies now on 
file in the Commissioner's office will not bear close investi- 
gation, although they were deemed to be satisfactory to 
Commissioner Higgins, who resigned his office to accept a 
fat position with the Pacific Mutual. 



THE Bear Club — the name must have been an inspira- 
tion— has been refused a permit to give a slugging 
exhibition, by the Supervisors. The reason for this failure 
upon the part of the Board to extend the discourtesies of 
the city to the band of bruisers lies in their intense loyalty 
to home industries, the statement being made that a simi- 
lar application was offered by a local gladiator, and denied. 
The Bear Club is backed by one Lynch, of mal-odorous 
Sharkey fame, and a rank outsider. The modesty of 
the Board in voting on the matter was very touching, sev- 
eral members delicately requesting that they might be ex- 
cused from going on record. Lynch should profit by this 
experience, and, when he does get a permit for the un- 
manly art, should be more liberal with deadhead tickets. 



IT is intimated that ex-Collector of Internal Revenue 
Welburn is insane, and that he was not responsible for 
the riotous corruption which made the last year of his 
official life one long picturesque debauch. Temporary in- 
sanity would delay his trial for dissipated funds; and the 
quiet of an asylum might restore him to the bosom of his 
friends and weaken the testimony against him. Indefinite 
insanity is much preferable to a definite penitentiary. 



IN the appointment of an assistant District Attorney at 
a salary of $250 per month, the Supervisors have given 
a new evidence of their disregard of reasonable economy. 
Mayor Phelan thoroughly investigated the necessities of 
the District Attorney's office recently, and demonstrated 
clearly that there exists no need for this assistant; but the 
fact that the city will get nothing in return for its $3,000 
per annum is a mere incident of the appointment which 
really has nothing to do with the case. Under the humane 
direction of the Board, the city is gradually becoming a 
great eleemosynary institution. 

GOVERNOR BUDD, in response to a very generally 
expressed desire, has appointed Mrs. Phoebe A. 
Hearst a member of the Board of Regents of the State 
University to fill the vacancy caused by the death of 
Charles F. Crocker. The Governor could not have been 
more wisely directed. Mrs. Hearst is a woman by both 
natural and acquired accomplishments peculiarly fitted 
for the position. She has long taken a deep and generous 
interest in the University and in educational matters gen- 
erally. The distinction of being the first and only woman 
ever appointed to this place becomes her well : Mrs. 
Hearst lends quite as much honor as she borrows in as- 
suming this responsible trust. 

THE complaint of unjust discrimination filed by J. S. 
McCue with the Railway Commission against the San 
Francisco and North Pacific Railway and the North 
Pacific Coast Railway in their established rates of fares 
between this city and SaD Rafael, has been brought to an 
unexpected and not altogether satisfactory ending — to that 
gentleman. The railroads have for a long time allowed 
women to travel between these points on monthly com- 
mutation tickets at three dollars, while men have paid five 
dollars for the same service. The Railroad Commission, 
after mature deliberation, has determined that there was 
unjust discrimination, and in proof of it has ordered that 
women shall hereafter pay $5 per month — the same as 
men — thus establishing a great principle of the equality 
of sex. It is just possible that Mr. McCue regrets that 
he spoke. 

THE unreliability of the yellow journalism is conspicu- 
ously apparent in the dispatches affecting Japanese 
intentions toward the Hawiian Islands. The story that 
Marquis Ito is now in Europe sounding the Powers for the 
purpose of making common cause against the United 
States, which was set out with the utmost circumstantial- 
ity , is flatly denied by that official. He is in gay Paris enjoy- 
ing life with no important mission before him, and only the 
friendliest feelings toward this country. The Japs do not 
want the Islands, as they have announced time and again 
— would not have them as a gift, and are only trying to 
secure for the subjects of that country now on the Islands 
under treaty stipulations, the rights that were guaran- 
teed to them when they first appeared there. Eventhis 
example of unreliability is hardly a fair illustration, inas- 
much as there is a Japanese named Ito, and he really is in 
Europe. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 31, 1897. 



TO GO OR NOT TO GO— TO THE KLONDYKE. 

THE News Letter has do desire to belittle the gold 
discoveries that have been made on the Klondyke at 
a point were it empties itself into the Yukon. On the 
contrary, it has every disposition to do justice to what has 
been brought to light. Nothing can be gained by suppress- 
ing the truth, and there would be much to lose, by trying 
to suppress it. Whenever all that has been said about the 
new El Dorado has been duly discounted, the broad fact 
remains that the Yukon and the streams tributary there- 
to, constitute a big country, full of placer mines as rich as 
the world has ever known, and that behind those placer 
mines there must be— judging from the nuggetty character 
of the gold that has already come to hand— quartz reefs as 
prolific as ever were discovered anywhere. To say all this 
is to say much, but we are impressed with its truthfulness. 
Yet the whole truth requires that a great deal more should 
be said. 

For the present, and until further prospecting has been 
done, the rich placer is of exceedingly limited area. It is 
situated on a narrow strip of bench land formed by the 
bringing down of the silt by the Klondyke to the Yukon. 
All the claims located within that patch are rich, as the 
gold to hand abundantly proves. But who knows what 
there is beyond that? We read of sturdy men working 
for the claim holders at from $10 to $15 per day. If claims 
were lying around loose for any man to take up, would 
miners be content to work for even such good wages, 
when dirt could be obtained yielding from $50 to $300 per 
pan? It is clear that the claims so far discovered are not 
numerous, and that those who have not been fortunate 
enough to locate them, are satisfied to work for a daily 
wage, rather than go further afield in search of prospects 
yet unknown. Gold is not to be found in paying quantities 
everywhere in Alaska. In fact the experience of hardy 
miners in that region has upon the whole been disappoint- 
ing. For more than twelve years past the most capable, 
and the most enduring of prospectors have been abroad in 
that land, but until now have failed to discover anything 
to attract attention. That there is more gold where that 
to hand has come from, we make no doubt, but that it will 
be found in a day, or that it will be for those who are rush- 
ing thither without experience, and without outfits and 
appliances, we do not believe. Long distances will have 
to be traversed, hard prospecting will have to be done, 
and innumerable hardships will have to be endured, ere the 
Upper Yukon country is made to yield up its treasures. 
It is a hard country — harder than those who are rushiDg 
to its confines aie willing to stop and consider. Without 
food for man or beast for about nine months in the year, 
without trails, or plains, or passable travelling, and with 
but short days and long nights for many months, it is the 
land of hopelessness and despair to the vast majority who 
will find no room for them in Dawson City, but who will 
have to go prospecting, or starve. How many engaged 
in the present rush are prepared for such experiences ? 
Not many, we venture to believe. 

Then how many of those who will start within the next 
week or two will succeed in reaching the Klondyke? Let 
us examine the facts. To go by water to St. Michaels, 
and thence by barges, stern wheel steamers, and the like, 
up the Yukon to Dawson City, will take from 40 to (iO days. 
Only 40 days remain until the Yukon is frozen over, and 
impassable to all save dog sleds, utterly inadequate to the 
conveying of the supplies necessary to the multitude who 
are proceeding by that route. The majority are going by 
the shorter overland route via Dyea, Juneau, the Chillcoot 
pass, and the inland lakes. The despatches to hand make 
it clear that there are enough supplies to hand at Juneau 
to take 12 months to transport over the narrow, snow 
covered, and almost impracticable trail by the way of the 
Chillcoot pass. What is to become of the thousands who 
have yet to arrive at Juneau? In view of the insurmount- 
able difficulties, we cannot believe that they can proceed 
upon their journey. We think they will have to go into 
Camp at Juneau for the winter, and eat up their supplies, 
if any they have. We look for a winter's camp there of 
20,000 or 30,000 people, and innumerable stories of want, 
suffering and death. Attractive as the gold to hand seems 
to be, the outlook for the journey at this late date more 
than sets off any conceivable or possible benefit that can 



accrue from a journey, hazardous at best, and pretty cer- 
tainly impossible. March or April next will be time 
enough to embark on an enterprise so obviously fraught 
with danger. 

Meanwhile, what of our home mines? With a fair knowl- 
edge of what we are writing about, we venture the as- 
sertion that if as many men and as much money, were let 
loose to explore our foothills, as will be started on the 
road to the Klondyke, the former would produce the 
better results. There are placer mines, with gold in 
sight, and much more in prospect, over an immense area 
of California. Almost anywhere in the foothills, a party 
of two or more men can go with a rocker, a pan, and picks 
and shovels, and earn two or three times the wages they 
are paid in the city, and, in addition, have the reasonable 
prospect all the time of striking pockets that will make 
them comparatively rich. Easy of access, in a genial 
climate, and with almost everything heart can wish for 
within reach, such prospects should not be given the go-by 
in favor of the very different conditions that a journey to 
the Klondyke at present involves. In any event, a winter's 
mining experience in California would be of great advan- 
tage to those who must needs venture to the frozen regions, 
and enough has been said to demonstrate that it is fool- 
hardy to start for there until the early spring. Death 
from either hunger, or cold, is not an enviable substitute 
for what the placer mines of California have to offer. 

Useless San Francisco has a great many societies of 

Noises, a public character. As elsewhere, some of 
them are useful and others are worthless. But 
there is one field that is now unoccupied which cries out 
to heaven for attention for twenty-four hours seven days 
in every week. We need here a Society for the Preven- 
tion of Noise. There is no time, day nor night, when the 
city is at peace. The roar and clatter, the ear-splitting, 
nerve-destroying thunder of the commercial procession of 
the streets, have become a scourge from which there ap- 
pears to be no escape nor even temporary relief. At night 
the ear of slumber is battered by the crash of the swiftly 
driven milk wagons, aided and abetted by the late flying 
carts of the butchery and the bakery. These murder 
sleep, induce profanity, and menace the lives of the sick, 
from the Potrero to the Park, from the water front to 
Bernal Heights. 

In the day time the din is increased a hundred-fold. In 
the business districts heavily-loaded wagons toil along the 
streets, harrowing the nerves and suspending all effort at 
intelligent conversation during their passage. Often this 
rumbling is accentuated by quantities of clanging iron and 
steel, at which times the deafening tumult becomes a posi- 
tive torture. 

There should be found a way of protecting the public 
from these perpetual assaults. In New York a Society 
for the Prevention of Noise is operating with marked suc- 
cess; and San Francisco should make an effort in the same 
direction. The Merchants' Association has given some at- 
tention to this really important question. It is a practi- 
cal matter, in which every citizen has an interest, for these 
unnecessary noises assail the ears of the just and the un- 
just alike. There is work in San Francisco for a practical 
Society for the Prevention of Noises. 

The Charter Mayor Phelan is both an ambitious 
Committee and a saDguine man. He is intent up- 

Of One Hundred, on winning the credit, denied to his 
many predecessors, of procuring the 
passage of a satisfactory charter during his term of 
office, and, what is more, he is perfectly sanguine of suc- 
cess. What he builds his expectations upon we do not 
pretend to know. Certain it is that there are no appre- 
ciable reasons in sight to warrant the belief that any 
charter that ought to pass, will sucseed in overcoming 
the opposition of the Bosses, contractors, taxeaters, and 
other corrupt elements at the polls. The last election 
may fairly be taken to have settled that question. The 
charter then rejected was well presented to the people, 
and at a time when the feeling in favor of reform was 
strong and general. Although carelessly drawn in parts, 
it was upon the whole as good a fundamental law as we 
are ever likely to get. It proved too good for the times, 
and was easily defeated, not because of its faults, but be- 



July 31. 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



cause of its excellencies. The committee that attended 
• ■ fate of that instrument, made a good fight, held 
meetings, delivered lectures, used the press freely and 
seemed to have things all their own way. The newspapers, 
for once, were almost a unit in support of the committee. 
The opposition made no apparent show, and nothing oc- 
curred in public to indicate that they had any sort of an 
organization. Yet with one accord, and as if with a com- 
mon instinct, the taxeaters and their friends voted against 
the proposed charter, and defeated it. What has happened 
since then, and what is likely to happen in the near future, 
to give Mayor Phelan, or any other good citizen, reason- 
able grounds to anticipate a reversal of the popular ver- 
dict then rendered? Five times has the experiment been 
tried, only to meet with signal failure on each occasion. 
Two special elections; one for the choice of fifteen free- 
holders, and the other for taking the vote on the charter, 
wili cost the city probably about $300,000 It is a large 
sum, and could be made to give us many better things than 
an aboitive charter election. It would nearly pay for the 
proposed park and zoo at the Mission. Moreover, in the 
ardent desire to get some sort of a charter through, 
great danger lurks. There are many things that can be 
compromised away that would satisfy the corrupt ele- 
ments. The police department could be continued in all 
its arrogance and unspeakable corruption. The Fire De- 
partment could be rendered more perfect as a political 
machine than it is. The schools could be handed over to 
Boss manipulation. The hangers on around the City Hall 
could be made permanent dependents on the body politic. 
We are very sure that Mayor Phelan, anxious as he is to 
pass a charter, would never agree to any such compro- 
mises, but we are not so sure that somebody in the end, 
and in every weariness of the subject matter, would not 
compromise away everything worth holding on to in a city 
Government. What we want before trying another 
charter experiment is more and better voters. We can 
get them by creating a greater San Francisco. Our city 
government needs, and is entitled to the help of all its 
suburban friends. We have the examples of Chicago and 
New York before our eyes. 

Canada's Americans who have returned from the 
Rule At Yukon Country give unstinted praise to the 
The Mines. Canadian Government, for its liberal laws 
relating to mining claims, as well as for the 
manner in which law and order have been maintained. 
Nobody has been restrained from digging for gold wherever 
he pleased, nor from freely walking out of the country 
with all of the yellow metal he could find. Disputes be- 
tween miners have been settled promptly by a capable 
official and a body of mounted police has been on hand to 
enforce, if necessary, the decrees of this officer, which, 
however, appear to have been so fair and just as to have 
satisfied all parties. When we recall the lack of order, 
the lawlessness, and deeds of violence that have almost in- 
variably attended our own mining rushes, we cannot but 
feel thankful that the hosts of Americans now making for 
the far off Klondyke, will meet with adequate protection, 
and that their rights will be secured to them by a quick 
and firm administration of justice. Of course, the extent 
to which we carry the principle of local self government, 
prevents our adopting the Canadian system. With us a 
community first grows, then organizes itself into a govern- 
ment and enforces its own laws. Under the British sys- 
tem the government follows the people wherever they 
settle, and at once establish law and order. With the 
condition of things now overtaking the Klondyke, the 
latter system has its advantages. Power to act in an 
emergency, is a good thing in the hands of responsible 
officials. If any serious calamity should overtake any of 
the prospectors within British territory, relief would be 
promptly extended them. As to the yarns the dailies are 
trading in as to an alleged intention of the Canadian 
authorities to enforce, among other things, an alien labor 
law against Americans, there is probably not a word of 
truth in them. In fact, they cannot be true. British 
policy and British treaties alike forbid any such procedure. 
Of course, the miners will not go altogether untaxed, but 
there will be no discrimination as to nationality. They 
will have to pay, and will cheerfully pay the cost of good 
government. 



The School The Xkus Lktteh is convinced, from nu- 
Department inorous facts that have come to its knowl- 
in Danger, edge, that the School Department is at 
this time in imminent danger. The majority 
of the Directors have gone wrong: they want to make 
places for their friends, and their friends are for the most 
part of the Boss stripe. Bosses Kainey and Kelly are 
running after them at their places of business, meeting 
them by day as well as by night, and keeping them in line 
for the coming coup d'ltat. Something like one hundred 
teachers are to make vacancies for pretended causes. 
The majority of the principals owe their present positions 
to political pulls, and, now that their services are needed 
by such pulls, they are of course ready to do what is ex- 
pected of them. What they have done, is to send in secret 
and clandestine reports of the incompetency of this or that 
teacher, with a view to removal for alleged cause, but 
really for the purpose of making vacancies for rascally 
Directors, at the behest of corrupt Bosses, to fill. We 
will predict here and now that this glaring job cannot be 
put through. It is our experience that the Bosses may 
do many things; they may loot the Street Department, 
fill the offices in the City Hall with their creatures, and 
divide about five millions out of the seven millions this city 
raises for taxes, but the one thing they cannot long suc- 
ceed in doing is to lay corrupt hands on the School De- 
partment. Quite apart from the teachers, whose influ- 
ence is great, the children, who are being educated are 
disseminators of knowledge, carry home tales of what is 
going on, and, in the end, the men who would lay ruthless 
hands on competent teachers, and debauch the School De- 
partment, had better have millstones around their necks 
and be drowned in the depths of the ocean. Who are the 
men, what their status in society, and what their moral 
make-up, who dare to bring down our public schools to the 
miserable exigencies and depravity of Bossism? That is 
an inquiry with which they will have to reckon if they pro- 
ceed as they now intend. Persons who best know the 
School Department say that in most instances it would be 
better to remove the principals and retain the teachers. 
The percentage of incompetency in the former is believed 
to be greater than in the latter, yet the present ring in 
the Board of Directors is of such a character that there 
must be no considerable dismissals at this time. 

The Good Time The boom in wheat still continues, and 
Coming. the outlook at this time is most encour- 

aging. It is now estimated by govern- 
ment experts that the crop in the United States will be at 
least 460,000,000 bushels, which is 32,000,000 bushels more 
than was produced in 1896, and the grain is selling for 
twenty-two cents a bushel more than it commanded this 
time last year, with every prospect of much higher prices. 
There will also be a large yield of corn, and crops of all 
kinds are fully up to the average, with fair to full prices 
ruling. 

This encouraging situation at home is strengthened by 
adverse conditions in foreign agriculture. Not one of the 
great wheat-growing countries of the world will gather an 
average crop. Argentina, Australia, Russia and India all 
report less than their customary yield, and this means 
that vast markets hitherto supplied by those countries 
will have to draw upon the United States for enormous 
quantities of wheat and other cereals. Argentina, our 
most formidable agricultural rival on this continent, 
has already made purchases of wheat in the United 
States — small, it is true, and ostensibly for seeding 
purposes, but still of sufficient volume to disclose the 
unfortunate results of her own harvest. Brazil, whose 
markets have been supplied by Argentina for several 
years, has become a heavy buyer of our wheat. Aus- 
tralia, with no wheat on hand and no harvest to gather 
before January, will have to buy vast supplies from this 
Coast, and England, in consequence of the Australian fail- 
ure, will be compelled to seek the same source of supply. 
The visible supply of the world's wheat is less than it has 
been in many years, and the present price is based upon 
the inexorable law of supply and demand. There is no 
speculation about it. The foundation of prosperity is ulti- 
mately in the soil, and the general prosperity of the whole 
country, now near at hand, finds its key-note in the culti- 
vated fields. 



SAX FRANCISCO XEWS LETTER. 



Jul j- 31, 1897. 



. =k A. The contractors on the new ferry depot struck 
Snag. asti. '■' made apj 

tior. :>uchers for work not 

performed on tn- mmis- 

saooer Chadbourne. who informed the derelicts that they 
need expect no money from him until they had shown more 
energetic disposition t>' earn it. The inactivity upon the 
part of the contractors on the State's work has been the 
subject of much unfavorable comment, and they have been 
warned by Mr. Cbadbourre that he would no longer toler- 
ate their excuses for lazy delays. In San Francisco a 
point has almost been reached where the contractor upon 
any public work can take his time without considering the 
loss to the city. State, or individual: and at the same 
by some unbusinesslike hocus-pocus, he is able to get his 
voucher accepted without protest or de aver- 

age contractor is prompt in nothing, excepting alone 
the application for his pay The New City Hall is 
tering illustration of sd and costly method of not 

doing public work. In the case of the new depot the dila- 
tory contractors have been warned repeatedly: but they 
gave no beed. and continued to do nothing . Now they 
have run against a man who appears to mean business. 
Chadbourne has firmly refused to sign any warrants until 
the contractors have shown a practical disposition to keep 
their promises. The idea that any excuse would do has 
received a startling shock, and the men who have been 
idling along wasting good weather and the peoples' money 
are rudely awakened to the fact that more than tempor- 
ary penitence is necessary. Every good citizen hopes 
that Commissioner Chadbourne will stand by bis resolu- 
tion — sign no warrants until the State has its equivalent. 
Let the motto be: no work no pay: and the pull, with its 
losses to the taxpayers and its fat for the contractors, 
will disappear. 

How is This A nation, like an individual, grows 
For a rich only by the process of earning 

Turn in tne Tide? more and spending less. That is what 
the United States have done to an un- 
usual extent during the past fiscal year. Notwithstand- 
ing the large imports of wool and sugar provoked by the 
our total imports fell off very greatly, and. despite 
the low prices that prevailed abroad for our cereals, the 
total value of our exports increased enormously. For the 
year l-*-7 we have a record-breaking volume of exports, 
as well as an unparalleled balance on the vear's trade! 
We exported merchandise to the value of 
which is more than we ever did before in a single vear. 
We imported goods to tbe value of J" lag a 

net balance in favor of this country of rx-ing 

in excess of any balance ever before credited to our com- 
merce. The unprecedented export trade was produced by 
the more general condition of lower home prices, cheapened 
processes of production, and close economy all round. 
which served to send American manufactures into outside 
markets to an extent never before known. This large 
balance has been used in one way or another in reducing 
our foreign obligations incurred during recent hard I 
It has gone far toward bringing the country on to a more 
solid, solvent and enduring industrial basis. But even 
greater thing's may be expected for the y- It is 

a pleasant prospect. Our great staple products are 
bringing higher prices, and the temptation no longer ex- 
ists to flood us with imports. If in addition to all this. 
the new tariff works as its friends predict, then, indeed, 
is our country on the high road to a degree of pros: 
that has not heretofore been equaled. 

How Sherman - * The country has Dot enthused over 
Di«;a Secretary Sberm:, dispatch 

Got Published, anent the seals question as it did over 
President Cleveland's pronunciamento 
in regard to Venezuela, which, no doubt, is a disappoint- 
ment to the aged Secretary How that dispatch came to 
be made public is one of the thi: _ as been exercis- 

ing the Eastern press. It appears that a batch of Bering 
Sea correspondence had been in tbe newspaper offices. 
e word to be given for publication, for some 
days. The obligations of the paDers thus favored i 
understood, and invariablv lived "up to. When the Presi- 



dent found that Sherman's over blunt note was amongst 
this correspondence, he promptly caused orders to be 
issued that none of it must be published at present, as it 
would be incompatible with public interests to do so. But 
n two or three days thereafter this single dispatch, 
tbe only offensive one in the lot, probably, was printed ex- 
clusively in the New York Tribune, of which Whitelaw 
Reid is the editor and proprietor. Why this apparent 
breach of faith was committed the other newspapers want 
to know, but none seems to be able to find out. It is re- 
ported that tbe State Department is reticent, and the 
President worried over the matter. Later on, news was 
sent all over the country, which has since been traced to 
the Tribune office, to the effect that Sherman's health for- 
bade his again assuming the active performance of the 
duties of his office, and that Whitelaw Reid was the choice 
of the Administration as his successor. All this wears a 
strange appearance. Did Reid cause that dispatch to be 
published in order to belittle Sherman, and to strengthen 
the idea abroad that the ill-health and irascibility of the 
Secretary unfit him to play the leading part in the role of 
diplomacy? If that be not the motive for the publication, 
the indications are all very misleading. Whilst all this 
has been going on in this coimtry. Whitelaw Reid has, at 
a boundless expense, been ingratiating himself with tbe 
nobility and royalty of England. Is all this intended to 
take off tbe sharp edge of certain writings of his that 
might otherwise have rendered him a pera rata in 

the Secretary cf State's office? Tbe intriguer who pushed 
poor Horace Greeley from his stool, took advantage of 
his weakness, and clutched the Tribune property, is not 
incompetent to play a like part in regard to another old 



Board of Health The present Board of Health of San 
ana the Francisco has shown a practical and 

School Directors, vigorous interest iu the affairs of the 
people calculated to inspire respect for 
its ability and confidence in its integrity. It is tbe first 
Board whose members have devoted time and energy to a 
serious consideration and discharge of the work before 
tbem. The Board has voluntarily broadened its scope, 
increased its responsibility, and made its influence felt in 
commercial circles as well as in a more restricted sense. 
The crusade for pure food, undertaken and carried for- 
ward by the Board of Health, has been of the utmost 
value in stamping out impure products, and in encourag- 
ing the manufacture of wholesome food. The revelations 
of investigation demonstrated tbe alarming extent to 
which adulterations had obtained here under the old order 
of things: and aroused to action dormant public senti- 
ment. What it has accomplished gives a guarantee for 
the future. 

The Board in the discharge of its duties has turned its at- 
tention to the hygiene of the schools of the city, and has in- 
timated that there is necessity for rigid enforcement of sani- 
tary regulations. The School Directors have taken issue 
with the Board and some of them have declared that 
its authority will be resisted. The people of San Francisco 

• and t>y the Board of Health. More particularly will 
thev do so since the recent disgraceful attempt of the 
School Directors to make a political machine of their de- 
partment. The fact that the Bosses are in consultation 

the members, and the sudden secret effort to throw 
out of position teachers who have proved by years of faith- 
ful service their fitness for responsibility, is an unanswer- 
able argument against the Directors. Men who would 
undertake to deliver the schools over to the machine are 
not entitled to the confidence of the people. The Board of 
. has won tbe confidence of the community: the 
School Directors have been discredited by their own acts, 
and have lost it. 

THE disrr Benjamin Andrews from the Presi- 

dency of Brown University, because of his pronounced 
views upon the silver question, has caused no end of unfa- 
vorable comment both in the East and abroad. It may be 
very well questioned whether such arbitrary action is good 
policy, whatever right the university has in tbe matter. 
Andrews stands high as an educator, and his dismissal 
will be regarded, whether it be true or not. as an attempt 
to restrain free speech and curtail individual opinion. 



July 3-, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE WHEEL OF FORTUNE. 

VI. 

COLONEL Jack Gambill was a typical gambler of this 
period. He was one of the handsomest men on the 
street, tall, of goodly presence, and always scrupulously 
well dressed. Colonel Jack, when the sports of the green 
cloth began to wane, went into the restaurant business, 
and took the wayside resort known in those days as "Un- 
cle Tom's Cabin." Here the Colonel entertained his 
friends royally, and the place for a terrapin stew was at 
" Uncle Tom's," with Colonel Jack as the overseer. 

Bill Thompson was as handsome as Colonel Jack, but was 
not regarded as square a mau. He went into partner- 
ship with Steve Whipple and Carriere. Carriere was a 
burly Frenchman, who had been a wrestler in his youth, 
and came from a Parisian circus to seek his fortune in the 
golden West. Now such was the honor among most gam- 
blers of this stripe that when the night's, or rather morn- 
ing's play was over, it was customary with those who won 
large amounts to leave their money in the gambling house's 
safe, subject to their order. It is related of Thompson 
that he kept the key of the safe; and that the other part- 
ners were ignorant of the combination. Now, sometimes 
when a depositor called for his money left over night, 
while Whipple and Carriere were on hand. Bill Thompson 
was missing. He was reported to have gone to the Mis- 
sion or the Twelve Mile House, kept by Thorpe, \vhere the 
highest class of refreshment was served. However, Bill 
Thompson kept out of the way until late in the evening. 
Now it naturally happened that the depositor, weary of 
waiting, bought a few stacks of chips on the strength of 
the money be had left in the safe. He usually lost it, and 
for this reason the boys soon grew shy of Bill Thompson's 
game. 

A good story told on Bill Brigg was that when he ar- 
rived at Sacramento overland, be wanted to bet that St. 
Louis was the largest city in the world, and seeing a 
schooner's anchor on the levee one day, Briggs declared 
that the man who made that pick was a fool, as nobody 
could use it. 

Pat Robson was fond of a good joke in and out of season. 
He had a man named Tom Stratton in his employ who 
used to deal and look out alternately. One night Tom 
was observed to nod while on his look-out perch, and Pat, 
calling all bets off for the time, quietly put out all the 
lights in the room, after giving the crowd an idea of the 
joke he intended. Then began in the darkness a clatter of 
chips, and a loud wrangle : 

I put that bet on the ace, I tell you" — " You did not ; 
'twas my bet " — " Here, you hand those chips over" — " I 
won't; they belong to me " — "Well, I appeal to Tom; he 
was looking on." 

Tom awoke, heard the angry voices about him, and was 
appalled by the impenetrable darkness. Then it struck 
him like a blow that he was stone blind. "Boys," he 
shouted in a tone of anguish, " the Lord help me. I've 
gone stone blind. I can't see a thing." 

A howl of laughter followed this, and then Stratton grew 
pathetic. 

" You call yourselves men," he yelled, "and laugh at a 
poor man's misfortune. Take me off, somebody, to a doc- 
tor. This is awful, awful," and here poor Tom completely 
broke down, and sobbed like a child. 

Then some one lit the gas, and Tom's feelings were 
mingled with indignation at the joke, and delight at having 
regained his sight. 

None of the big houses encouraged clerks and young 
accountants to come their way and lose their money. They 
were better satisfied with their employers, who quietly 
drew a check when the game was over and made no fuss 
about their losses. On the other hand the suckling bloods 
who loved to boast of a career of vice, "beefed" when 
they dropped a few dollars, and magnified it by the hun- 
dreds. Again, they were not acting square with the game, 
for when they received a douceur from the bank to enable 
them to ride home, they violated the rule of the house, and 
passed it to some chum to play with against the enemy. 
This was considered mean in the extreme, the unpardon- 
able sin of faro. 

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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 31, 1897. 




gjHBp U> KM-fM L» J V 



" We obey no wand but pleasure's."— Tom Moor*. 

THE difference between Papinta and 
Loie Fuller is that Papinta can 
dance. A man who paid a dollar and a 
half to see Loie Fuller at the California 
last year told me that the only difference 
he could make out was a dollar. But he 
was a coarse man and mercenary. So far as actual exe- 
cution is concerned, the difference lies in Papinta's fleet- 
ing limbs. Not even an Englishman would accuse La Loie 
of dancing. She couldn't dance in the first place, and she 
is above it in the second. La Loie is an author, a painter 
if you like, and she has the brains of two ordinary-sized 
men, and the sweet urbanity (off the stage) of twenty 
press agents. She knows that on the stage the charm of 
her personality is non-existent (if she has not known this 
always it was discovered to her when she tried panto- 
mime), and there is never a moment in the dance when she 
insists upon herself. The gleaming silk is a creation 
apart. It is art objective; you would never think of bring- 
ing it to the low ego of a name and address. Neverthe- 
less I have often thought that La Loie might work even 
more wonderful wonders from that picture brain of hers 
if she would train some beautiful, gracile girl to do the 
posing and the acting; and Papinta convinces me that I 
have not been far wrong. For Papinta, you might say, 
is an actor rather than an author. She has a fair idea of 
dumb show. And she can dance. When she dances, a 
live, feverish woman vibrates in the calcium; body is not a 
mere figure of speech; legs and other features become 
palpable and personal, and what is not revealed by ordi- 
nary optics is shown forth with cheerful clarity by ten 
life-sized mirrors semi-circled round the stage. In your 
heart you may remember Loie Fuller, the author of these 
radiant dance-poems — just as sometimes you will remem- 
ber William Shakespeare during a Daly season — but your 
largest attention is to the lady in the skirts, who is not a 
mere calcium expert, nor a mere silkshaker, but Papinta, 
a vivid young creature of strong arms, supple waist and 
legs that are sleek, galvanic and unafraid. 

* # * 

I had the honor of meeting Papinta. She was gentle 
and normal. I couldn't help telling her that, as orator, 
raconteur, recipient of panegyrics from crowned heads 
and general expounder of illuminated art and seducer of 
the press, she was not up to La Loie. 

" But then," she said, " I can dance." 

* * * 

For the Orpheum's sake Papinta comes in the nick of 
time. The barrel-jumping Deonzos, and Crawford and 
Manning, the colored Congressmen, are good enough inci- 
dental people, but not of a quality to compensate for a 
Dockstader. Miss Imogene Comer, the spieler-voiced 
melodramatist, is still singing swollen-heartedly about 
mother's tomb; and Miss Ida Gray Scott, the young so- 
prano who was rescued from a church choir by vaudeville 
missionaries, warbles knowingly through the songs of sev- 
eral nations. 

During the entire show Monday night I did not hear one 
Klondyke gag. How deftly Dockstader used to land upon 
the immediate topic! And spice is the life of variety. 

* * * 

Speaking of Dockstader, here is a good one on him. 
Like William Gillette— who scorns to play a part unless 
there is a cigar in it— Dockstader riots his wage in smoke. 
He discovered a perfecto of particularity at Mose Gunst's 
when he arrived in San Francisco some six weeks ago, and 
he stuck to the shop and the brand as long as he was here. 
He must have burned a thousand. Last Sunday, on the 
way to the southbound express, accompanied by James 
Swinnerton, the Maddox Brown of the Examiner, and 
Philip Hastings, the passionate press agent of the Or- 
pheum, he said, "Boys, I must stop a moment at Gunst's; 
the head clerk there told me to drop in before leaving 



town. From the way he spoke, I think he wants to give 
me a small box." Then he tittivated his waistcoat and 
continued, modestly, "There's nothing like being a popu- 
lar member." 

The trio lined up at the counter. Dockstader broke the 
ice gently by spreading out a dollar and saying, "I'll take 
a good-bye quartette of those cigars." 

"Just a minute, Mr. Dockstader," said the clerk, gath- 
ering in the dollar and stepping to the desk. 

Dockstader smiled as a man smiles who is about to be 
surprised with a gold-headed cane. 

The clerk came forward. "This is a card of introduc- 
tion, " he said, "to our agent at Los Angeles; he keeps 
that brand of yours." 

"That man," said Dockstader, on the way out, "is a 
libel on his race; he's a natural born Endeavorer." 

* * * 

A paragraph announcing Eddie Foy among the fruits of 
the coming season, reminds me of a not bad one on him. 
A group of theatrical men were discussing Nat Goodwin 
on Powell street, where the actors come from. Foy was 
among them and he broke in on a eulogy with, "Aw, 
Goidwinl why, we started in the business together." 

"Well, Eddie," said the eulogist, "somebody must have 
tied you." 

* * * 

And still speaking of stories, here's another — I don't 
know whether it is on me or on Frawley. I went out of 
town for a week after The Fatal Card — I really needed 
the change. Mell Marks, the dusky Adonis of the Colum- 
bia management, was about the first man I met on the 
return. 

"Where have you been, and what have you been doing?" 
he asked; "writing a play?" 

In a jestful spirit I pleaded guilty. 

" What kind?" said he. 

"Melodrama," said I. 

"For God's sake," he said, "don't show it to Tim!" 

* * * 

Well, there are worse things than melodrama, even if I 
should write one. A Klondyke melodrama would be just 
the thing now. How would this do ? 

Heroine supposedly rich, Hero poor; they love. 

Father about to bankrupt; rich suitor suggested — she 
marries and saves the firm. 

Husband comes home early and discovers Hero in his 
(Husband's) slippers. Great Fire-Escape Scene. Hero 
climbs hand over hand along fifty feet of telegraph wires; 
loses slippers in flight; is saved by dropping on a load of 
hay that passes at the proper moment. 

Gold discovered on the Klondyke. Heroine disguised as 
a newspaper correspondent, and Hero working as stoker, 
make their escape on the good ship Sapolio. Unknown to 
all, Husband is traveling incog in the steerage. Fever 
breaks out — in Husband. He is about to be thrown over- 
board for a hoodoo when Heroine rushes forward and 
agrees to nurse him in an air-tight compartment. Hero 
stokes, says nothing; but he drops a keg of powder in the 
furnace. Great Explosion Scene. 

Last act. Ice clinking against the golden shore. Hero 
swims in with Husband and Heroine on his neck — joins 
their hands and falls on bed of nuggets. Great Exhaustion 
Scene. Red fire dawn breaks over the frozen North. All 
kiss and make up. Hero dies to curtain. 

All rights reserved by Ashton Stevens. 

As already announced, Mr. John Drew will begin his 
sixth season as a star under the management of Charles 
Frobman at the Baldwin Monday evening, presenting the 
much-written-about Rosemary. No play presented last 
season in America or England, with the possible exception 
of Secret Service, has been more successful than this poetic 
comedy, which comes from the pens of Louis N. Par- 
ker and Murray Carson. Charles Wyndham played it 
at the Criterion in London for over a year, and John Drew 
occupied the boards of the Empire Theatre with it for 
about five months, following that record up with long runs 
in Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago, and other big playgoing 
centers. 

* * * 

The Columbia offers The Case of Rebellious Susan, a prob- 
lem comedy by Henry Arthur Jones that was made known 



July 31, 1897. 



SAX KRAXCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



tn us two seasons ago by the Lyceum Company. Frank 
Worthing has the part of Sir Richard Kato, the part that 
Herbert Kelcey played so admirably; and Miss Bates has 
Susan, the retaliatory wife who rebels at marital indis- 
cretions being reserved entirely to the masculine sex. 
Plays may have changed, but the world is in about the 
same old state it was in when this problem was first 
played. It promises to be good entertainment, and the 
subject of no end of argument, in the hands of the Frawleys. 

* * # 

Glonima is risen again, and laughter is the order of the 
nights at the Alcazar. The company gives a comical per- 
formance of this popular farcical comedy. Every week 
since Mr. Belasco's return from the East has seen new 
additions to the stock company. Xext week there will be 
three more initial appearances. It was found necessary 
to postpone Mr. Powers's new battle-drama, Turk Mats 
Greek, for another week; so, Monday night, Betsy, a light 
comedy by F. C. Durrand, will be given. Also a curtain- 
raiser (there is a vogue for short pieces at the Alcazar) 
entitled House or Home, in which Mr. Carlyle will assume 

the leading role. 

* * # 

It will be remembered that Trans' was turning people 
away from the Tivoli doors when it had to be withdrawn 
on account of the booking of The Isle. Wang, with the 
same glittering production that inaugurated the Stevens 
season, will be the bill all of next week at the Tivoli. 
After that comes the Hinrichs opera season, with the new 
grand opera company. Aida opens. 

* * * 

Four more new turns at the Orpheum Monday night. 
Prof. Leonidas, who is said to have one of the best of the 
season in bis cat and dog entertainment; Miss Mary 
Arniotis, the stroDg woman, who will raise everything ex- 
cept the Orpheum prices; the Rackett Brothers, known 
as "musical harvesters;" and Elvira Frencelli and Tom 
Lewis, operatic satirists. 

TO SLEEP WELL EAT BEFORE RETIRING. 

« LIGHT supper just before retiring is usually of ad- 
vantage. Baby and brute animals are usually somno- 
lent when their stomachs are well supplied with food, the 
activity of the stomach drawing the excess of blood from 
the brain, where it is not needed during sleep, says the 
Medical Record. 

On the other hand, people who are very hungry usually 
find it very difficult to sleep. And then, a habit of sleep 
at a regulated time and during proper hours should be 
cultivated in case this habit has been lost. In accomplish- 
ing this the attainment of a favorable state of mind is of 
great importance. 

Sleep cannot be enforced by a direct exercise of the will. 
The very effort of the will to command sleep is enough to 
render its attainment nugatory. The mental state to be 
encouraged is one of quiescence, one of indifference, a feel- 
ing that the recumbent posture is a proper one for rest, 
and that if the thoughts are disposed to continue active 
they may be safely allowed to take their course without 
any effort toward control. This state of mind and thought 
is next akin to dreams, and dreaming is next to sound 
sleep. 

THE selection of W. G. Doane as assignee of the great 
mercantile establishment of J. J. O'Brien & Co., is a 
very deserved compliment to that gentleman, whose large 
experience in the drygoods business in this city well quali- 
fies him for that responsible position. As is well-known, 
this assignment is in no sense an indication that the firm 
is, or was, financially embarrassed; but it was thought to 
be, in this instance, the simpler way of reaching the read- 
justment of interests that would naturally and necessarily 
follow the death of the head of the house. 



An Ounce of Prevention 
is cheaper than any quantity of cure. Don't give children narcotics 
or sedatives. They are unnecessary when the intant is properly 
nourished, as it will be if brought up on the Gail Borden Eagle 
Brand ( 'ondensed Milk. 



When playing poker drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Baldwin Theatre- AI " HAYMAN * Co " ,,b fK3B!ES 

Reopening Monday. August 2d. MR. JOHN DREW, under the 
direction of Charlea Fronman in his latest and greatest success, 



ROSEMARY. 

By Louis N. Parker and Murray Carson. 
Matinee Saturday. 



G-L.^L' TL A J_ * The "Gem" Theatre of the Coast. 
OIlimDia I fteaure- Friedlander.Gottlob&Co., Lessees 
and Managers. 

Monday, August 2d. Tenth week of the Season. THE FRAW- 
LF.Y COMPANY, in Henry Arthur Jones's comedy, 

THE CASE OF REBELLIOUS SUSAN. 

Monday, August 9th— The Idler. 

T; , I' r\ jL-i Mrs. Ernestine K re ling, 

I VOl I Upera llOUSe. Proprietor and Manager 

Commencing Monday, August 2d. Last week of the Edwin 
Sttvens comic opera season. By special request, the greatest 
of all comic operas, 

WANG, 

The success of successes. 

Monday evening, August 9th, opening of the grand opera season. 
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and Sunday, ajda, 
Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, ROMEO & JULIET. 
Eminent artists; careful productions, splendid chorus, en- 
larged orchestra. 
Popular Prices , 25e and 50o 

AI 'T'L _J__ Belasco & La Faille, Lessees and Man- 
ful CdZaf I neatXe. agers; Mark Thall, Director. 

Comedy week. A sure cure for ennui, that tired feeling; drive 
away dull care. Monday, August 2d— Two comedy bills. Mr. 
Franois Carlyle, in Glen MacDonough's comedy sketch, 

HOUSE OR HOME, 

and the farcical comedy, BETSY. 

Monday, August 9th : Powers's Greco-Turkish Turk Meets 

Greek. 



Orph 



San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall, O'Farrell 
street, between Stockton and Powell streets. 



eum. 

Week beginning Monday evening, August 2d. Europe's greatest 
novelty, 

PROFESSOR LEONIDAS, 

And his wonderful cat and dog entertainment; Miss Mary Ar- 
niotis, the strongest woman m the world; the three Rackett 
Bros., musical harvesters; Elvira Frencelli & Tom Lewis, vo- 
calists and travestists; the only Papinta. "myriad dancer"; 
tne Deonzos, trick barrel jumping; Crawford & Manning, Ida 
Grey Scott, and a host of novelties. 

Reserved seats, 25c ; balcony 10c ; opera chairs and box seats 50c. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. Matinee Prices: 
Parquet, any seat, 25c; balcony, any seat, 10c; children. 10c, 
any part . 

dOHN D. SULLIVAN 

Attorr\ey-at- Law 
Rooms 34-38, 3d Floor Chronicle Building, San Francisco. 

DR. BYRON W. HAINES 



14 Grant Avenue 
Rooms 16-17-18-19 



Dentist 



over "Gity of Paris.' 



DR. ARTHUR T. REGENSBURGER, 



Dentist, 

Office and Residence, 409^ Post street, San Francisco. 

Office Hours, 9 to IS A. m. ; 1 to 5 p. M. Telephone Clay 84 

Dr. F. G. PAGUE 

Dentist 

Rooms 4 and 5, Academy of Sciences Building, 819 Market street 

DRS. DERBY X WINTER, Dentists, 

Of S06 KEARNY STREET, removed to Room 33, Flood Build- 
ing, Market and Fourth Streets 
Telephone, Clay 391. 



Nelson's flmiiGose. 



Unequalled for Poison Oak, Sunburn, all Irritation of the Skin, 
and for the Toilet generally. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 3i, 1897. 




The Mighty Atom, by Marie Corelli. Published by the J. B. l.ippin- 
cott Company, Philadelphia, 189*5. 

It was with misgivings that we took up this, the first of 
Miss Corelli's stories that we have read. We had heard 
that Miss Corelli's books are much admired by Her Majesty 
the Queen of Great Britain, and having in earlier days 
glanced over some pages of "Leaves of our life in the 
Highlands," we were filled with a vague mistrust. But 
this feeling was dispelled before we had read many pages 
of "The Mighty Atom." It is a very simple tale, built 
out of slight materials, yet of almost unvarying strength 
and interest. It merely tells how Lionel, a poor, little 
fellow of eleven years of age. the son of John Valliscourt, 
an Englishman of good social position and fortune, is 
driven to suicide by the excessive amount of intellectual 
work that he is forced by his father to perform. The 
scene is laid at Combmartin, in northern Devonshire, not 
far from Lynton, Lynmouth, Clovelly, and other delight- 
fully picturesque spots in that beautiful English county. 
The old Professor, who acts as tutor to Lionel, does not 
win our regards at first, for he is dry, pompous, and 
not over-kind to his sensitive pupil, but he turns out at 
last to be a much better fellow than the reader had sus- 
pected. The most attractive character in the book, next 
to Lionel himself, and his little sweetheart Jessamine, is 
Reuben Dale, the old sexton and grave digger, a life-size 
portrait of James Norman, verger of Combmartin Church. 
Miss Corelli writes in a clear, vigorous English, and her 
style is strong without "slopping over." She shows an 
evident dread and alarm at the spread of atheistical 
notions from France to England, and deems education 
without religion a most dangerous thing. It is, of course, 
always much more easy to demolish than to build up, to 
pull down than to reconstruct, and it seems a cruel thing 
(to say the least) to shatter a child's belief in a good and 
omnipotent Creator when you have nothing to offer him 
instead. To tell a trustful, open-hearted child, curious 
about the mystery of creation, that there is no personal 
First Cause, but only a Mighty Atom, is to deprive him of 
all firm ground to stand upoo, and to fill his soul with des- 
olation aDd haunting emptiness. The utter weariness and 
hopelessness of Lionel's mind, thoroughly inoculated with 
his father's atheism, are absolutely pathetic; indeed, there 
are passages which it is almost impossible to read without 
one's eyes filling with tears. While nothing is more re- 
pulsive or ludicrous to us than the cocksureness of many 
religionists, we have no patience with those who would im- 
pose their own unbelief upon the innocent and impression- 
able minds of the young. In matters upon which the 
wisest men differ, and about which certain knowledge is 
unattainable, it may well be that the child like confidence 
and trust of the believer are nearer to eternal truth than 
all the speculations of the philosophers, and that things 
which have been bidden from the wise have been revealed 
to babes. 

We have before commented on the admiration enter- 
tained for each other's work by the members of the staff 
of that enterprising and interesting publication, Collier's 
Weekly. It is almost wholly written by the two Edgars — 
Saltus and Fawcett — and the two J's, John Habberton and 
Julien Hawthorne. In a recent issue in the department 
entitled "Our Xote-Book," Mr. Edgar Saltus speaks of 
his "eminent and accomplished colleague, Mr. Edgar Faw- 
cett," and quotes approvingly from the Troy Observer the 
following words: "Collier's Weekly has assumed an impor- 
tant and unique place in periodical literature. It presents 
a large, varied, and valuable amount of material, contrib- 
uted regularly by a staff, the high character of which has 
never before been exemplified upon a weekly paper.'' 
Does the writer of these words really think that" the Athe- 
naeum, The Academy. The Spectator, or tt; Saturday Re- 
view, have never at any time had upon their staffs four 
men equal to Messrs. "Saltus, Fawcett, Habberton, and 



Hawthorne ? Yet Mr. Saltus says that these words are 
"not a string of compliments, but a string of facts." As 
Mr. Saltus modestly excludes himself from the staff "the 
high character of which has never" (What? never ! Mr. 
Saltus) " before been exemplified upon a weekly paper," 
the taffy remains to be divided between Messrs. Habber- 
ton. Fawcett and Hawthorne. A little further along in 
the same issue Mr. Edgar Fawcett delivers himself as fol- 
lows: "Recently I received a New York letter from Mr. 
Edgar Saltus containing this poignant bit of descriptive 
color which only he could have given us." After quoting 
the " poignant bit" he proceeds: " It seems to me that if 
I had come across this sentence, quite unsigned, in some 
Anglo-Indian newspaper, I should immediately have mur- 
mured 'Edgar Saltus!'" And suppose he had, what 
would that have proved ? Merely that Mr. Saltus has a 
certain individuality of style that is easily recognized by 
his devoted admirers. 

In a recent issue of The North American Review there 
is a paper by Elizabeth Bisland, in which she comes to the 
conclusion that American parents, while exceedingly in- 
dulgent to their children, do actually selfishly neglect 
their permanent interests, especially in the matter of 
dowering their daughters comfortably, and aiding their 
sons to establish business and homes for themselves. Mrs. 
Kate Gannet Wells, who once explained "why more wo- 
men do not marry," now says that the reasons "Why 
more men do not marry," are the great demands made by 
modern women, the husband's fear of feminine criticism, 
the increased comforts of men's clubs, higher education, 
the growing love for athletic exercises, and the summer- 
girl. The last gratifies a man's taste for feminine society, 
and destroys his inability to love one woman steadily. 
Charming as she may be, and skillful as she is in the art of 
flirtation, a man does not care to be the last in a long 
series ox men who have squeezed her hand, kissed her lips, 
and hugged her form. Mrs. Wells is also kind enough to 
say that men have grown more modest, and, not feeling so 
sure of acceptance as they formerly did, have become 
slower in "popping the question." She thinks it possible 
that women, since they became self-supporting, have be- 
come less charming and attractive to men, and do not so 
quickly excite thoughts of love. We do not as a rule much 
regard feminine critics of masculine conduct, but Mrs. 
Wells seems in this instance to sum up the matter fairly, 
giving to each consideration its due weight. 

Little Journeys to the Homes of Famous Women, by El- 
bert Hubbard." Vol. III. No. ti, Rosa Bonheur. Pub- 
lished by G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York and London. 
Ten cents each month, and one dollar per year. This is a 
pleasant account of a visit to the home of the famous 
French animal painter, at By, near Fontaineblau. Inci- 
dentally Mr. Hubbard tells "us of a little coterie of four 
girls, students of Art in Paris, who kept house in the large 
attic of a dwelling standing in a little side street leading 
off the Boulevard Moctmartre. Prefixed to the little 
book is a portrait of Rosa Bonheur, showing a singularly 
masculine head and a breast decorated with the cross of 
the Legion of Honor, pinned there by the Empress 
Eugenie, who, accompanied by Napoleon III., visited the 
great artist's country house. The other papers that are 
to appear during the present year will deal with Madame 
de Stael, Elizabeth Fry, Mary Lamb, Jane Austen, the 
Empress Josephine, and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. 

While we do not entertain any very high opinion of the 
value of publications that undertake to teach people how 
to write, and how to get what they write accepted by edi- 
tors, we are yet willing to say that, of such publications, 
we consider The Editor, issued at Franklin, Ohio, the best. 
It is, we believe, under the supervision of Mr. James Knapp 
Reeve, who, while his style is by no means above reproach, 
is yet a writer of practice and experience, who can say 
pretty clearly what he wants to say. In the July issue, 
under the head of "Literary Beginnings," Mr. Reeve 
makes some interesting remarks, in the course of which 
he speaks of the cacaethes tcribendi; meaning, of course, 
eaco-clhes, the bad habit ; but perhaps this is a typographi- 
cal error. In a later article we find a young woman writ- 
ing that "the iptii tcribendiwBB born" in her blood; what 
this may be we have not the remotest idea. 



July 31, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




NO doubt Mr. Paul May, 
who passed th rough 



Saa Francisco this week on his way home from Japan, re- 
garded the city with some interest, as his lather was a 
resident here for several years during the '(JO decade- 
Mr. Julius May. who was not only Belgian Consul at this 
port, but a partner in the banking house of Davidson 
vV May. agents of the Rothschilds, was a favorite in the 
society of that period. He was a jovial little fellow, a 
fluent linguist, an accomplished host, and the possessor of 
a highly-cultivated baritone voice, which made him a wel- 
come addition atmusicales, amateur concerts, etc. Shortly 
after bis departure from San Francisco news reached here 
of his marriage in Belgium, and an acquaintance, making 
inquiry of one of his friends in this city, was told, "May is 
quite happy as a Benedict, the only disturbing element in 
bis menage is the fact that he only speaks eleven languages 
while his wife is mistress of twelve; so May is studying two 
more for the purpose of being one ahead." Mr. May at his 
death left in his will a handsome sum to be given to San 
Francisco charities, and not long ago his widow visited 
this city to arrange for its proper distribution. 

* * * 

Can it be true that the apparently adamant heart of 
our ger.ial Mayor has found an affinity in the city of the 
Holy Cross ? Dame Rumor says so, and the old lady can 
sometimes give cards and spades to Cupid and beat him at 
his own game. You will remember the old ditty, "There's 
a charming little widow," etc. Well, this one doesn't 
keep a grocery store, but she lives up on the hill, and they 
do say that Jimmy is awfully fond of her. 

* * * 

The horseback picnic given up at Castle Crags by the 
Misses Kip was a huge success, writes a girl from there, 
and Miss Mary's fine riding was the theme of admiration 
all day. Apropos of riding, Captain Dilhayn will have to 
look to his laurels as a riding master, now that the Brit- 
ish appendage of the Pixley family is again in the field, 
that gentleman having made his reappearance among the 
" 'osses" at the San Rafael paper chase. 

* * * 

The long drawn out, but greatly attenuated, form of 
Gordy Ross, the artist, was never displayed to greater 
advantage than when he singly and alone represented an 
entire troupe of French Amazons at the midsummer jinks 
of the Bohemian Club. The resemblance between his nether 
limbs and those of the members of the French opera com- 
pany that visited us some time ago, was so great that 
Amadee Joullin went into a trance at once. 

* # * 

The month of September is expected to bring many of 
its old patrons down to Del Monte. The Tevises are said 
to be booked for there when the Fred Sharons arrive 
from the East, and the Parrott family, in all its numer- 
ous branches, will also be on the ground. There are al- 
ways a lot of nice tourists at the hotel the season through, 
and several rich widows make it their locale for the entire 

summer. 

* # # 

The sad death of popular "Fred Crocker," as the Col- 
onel was best known among his friends, has cast a gloom 
over San Mateo and Burlingame society, and it is doubt- 
ful if gaiety will be known until Joe Grant brings his bride 
down to his home there. Much gossip is bubbling up over 
a young couple in tbat vicinity, but nothing further than 
nods and whispers are indulged in so far. 

* * * 

If things go by what gossip says, the bridal tour abroad 
of a well-known young society couple has been abridged 
and the home-coming hurried, owing to the rumored in- 
tention of the old gentleman to give the fine n,ew house a. 
mistress who would not be his daughter-in-law, and this 
would not be at all to the taste of the young couple afore- 
mentioned. ' 



Rumor says that visiting Californians to the recent Jubi- 
lee festivities in England got scant courtesy from Lady 
Hesketh, »''r Sharon, who did not extend the right hand 
of fellowship to her erstwhile townsmen and women. But 
then, as a London social light remarked to a San Fran- 
ciscan who was commenting upon " Flo.'s" cold shoulder, 
"she finds it all she can do to paddle her own canoe"; so 
possibly her care to know Americans is lost in the more 
aristocratic British atmosphere. 
11 # * 

The girls are divided in their opinion as to the pleas- 
ures of croquet, the recently rejuvenated game. Those 
girls who can boast of owning pretty little feet are de- 
lighted at its reappearance, but the long-stride, flat-footed 
tennis girl "don't in the least care for it, doncher know." 

* * * 

Sausalito is forging ahead as a center of jollity, the 
nearness of the navy officers no doubt being recently a 
powerful adjunct, and then, too, there are so many bache- 
lors " lying round loose" that the women have more than 
a good chance for a capture. 

* * * 

"Jim Phelan is getting to be a regular prig," said a 
society girl of several seasons the other day; and all be- 
cause our worshipful Mayor preferred business in town to 
a prolonged stay by the sad sea waves at Santa Cruz. 

* * * 

Old Mrs. Gossip says that Kate Salisbury is to be ihe 
bride of the winter. Many hearts are sighing for her, for 
she's such a sweet girl. Now guess who the fortunate 
man will be. 

* # * 

The excellent cuisine of the Hotel Rafael is responsible 
for the increased avoirdupois of the genial Ed, and it will 
take a season of cotillion leading to get him into training 
gear again. 

"Eat, drink and be merry" at the Maiaon Eicbe, Geary and 
Grant avenue, where the tables are supplied with every dainty, the 
wine the best, the music delightful, the service perfect and the 
cuisine in charge of the most competent French chef on the Fa 
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SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 31, 1897. 




AH AliF dozen of us were seated before the broad win- 
dows of the cafe, idly .hatting, when the conversa 
tion drifted to a general discussion as to the possibility of 
one's hair turning gray as a result of some tremendous 
emotion or awful fright, when a man seated near us slowly 
rose, pushed his chair from him, and approached our 
table. He was a fine, tall fellow, of herculean build, and 
his intelligent features, which bore an expression of great 
determination, were rendered very striking by a pair of 
keen blue eves: but what made his appearance still more 
remarkable was the fact that both his hair and beard were 
as white as snow, although they surrounded a countenance 
which would not permit one to reckon his age at more 
than about thirty-five. 

" Excuse me. gentlemen, if I am interrupting your con- 
versation.'' he remarked, bowing politely to all of us. 
" You were just discussing a subject that has more than 
an ordinary interest for me. I happen myself to lie a liv- 
ing proof that, under certain circumstances, a terrible 
shock to the mind can produce that self-same physical 
effect of which you were just speaking, and which the ma- 
jority of you seem to discredit." 

These words naturally excited the curiosity of all pres- 
ent to the highest degree. We quickly made room for our 
new acquaintance at the table, and, when he had seated 
himself comfortably, urged bim to relate to us the circum- 
stances which had produced such a strange and sudden 
change in his appearance. The stranger feli/ned no great 
shyne-s. and acquiesced in the most pleasant manner pos- 
sible by relating to us the following: 

'* If any of you gentlemen have ever interested yourself 
more closely in American affairs, the name of Auburn 
cannot well be strange to you : it denotes much the same 
for the United States as Spielberg does for Austria. You 
must not picture Auburn to yourselves merely as a gloomy 
and extensive prison — as one large, solitary building — no'. 
It is rather an entire colony of children, a sort of town or 
metropolis for the wretches that the community has thrust 
out. 

"Shut in by immense walls, which rise up from the level 
plain to a considerable height, are crowded together a 
large number of detached buildings — bouses that contain 
the prison-cells, warders' dwellings, hospital, and work- 
shops — all sullen and forbidding-looking : and here and 
there dotted about may be seen a small patch of grass, a 
few trees, and, very occasionally, a flower-bed, like the 
last lingering recollections of innocent childhood amongst 
the black thoughts of a criminal. 

rtain events, which would have but little interest for 
you, had led to my journeying from Hamburg — my birth- 
place — to America, immediately after the completion of 
my studies, and, after a short stay in New York. I ac- 
cepted the post of prison-doctor at Auburn, which, as you 
perhaps know, is situated in the State of New York. I 
was entrusted with the medical supervision over that part 
of the prison which was set apart for the worst class of 
criminals — men, or I should say human hyenas, whose 
blood, as Mephistop'r ad already ceased to be 

'a fluid of rare qua 

" Two of these wretches were destined to spend the re- 
mainder of their days in the prison, and they, by reason of 
their great physical strength, as well as by* the extraor- 
dinary canning they had evinced in several desperate at- 
tempts to regain their freedom, were subjected to even 
closer supervision than the rest of their companions. I 
was an object of particular hatred and dislike to these two 



IHr "-Y fi v ' io 



scoundrels, because I had been instrumental in the discov- 
ery of a number of iron implements which they — God only 
knows how they bad obtained possession of them ! — had 
concealed under their clothes: and again on another occa- 
sion because I had refused to receive them into the hospi- 
tal when they had feigned illness, expecting doubtless when 
they were once in there that they would find more favor- 
able opportunities for accomplishing their escape. The 
ruffians were separated and placed in remote parts of the 
prison, and were laden with chains: but in spite of all these 
precautions, one tine morning the one. and a few days 
later the other, together with their chains, had disap- 
peared without leaving a trace behind them. 

'It must have been almost a fortnight after the flight 
of these two criminals, which had caused the utmost con- 
sternation amongst the authorities at Auburn, that I or- 
dered my horse one afternoon, and started off for a ride 
to Cayuga Bridge. It was mid-day when I reached the 
end of my journey, and I stood still for some time contem- 
plating with silent delight the exquisite scenery which lay 
stretched out for miles before me. The Cayuga Lake, one 
of those which, together with Lake Erie, compose that 
vast system of inland seas in the State of New York, lay 
in all its beauty at my feet. The long, slender streak of 
silver wound in and out of the rugged black cliffs which 
hemmed it in. and which rose up sheer out of the lake, 
facing each other like grim opponents who bad for thou- 
sands of years bid one another defiance. Far down the 
lake, which is forty miles long, and at this particular spot 
about one broad. I could discern the enormous trestle- 
bridge, a marvel of American engineering skill, which car- 
ries the Auburn division of the New York Central Rail- 
way across, passing on its way through the small station 
of Cayuga Bridge. 

" My business in the village was soon ended, and towards 
evening I started home again. Do you know how delight- 
ful a ride on a summer's evening is? Cayuga Bridge is 
surrounded by extensive oak forests, through which the 
greater part of my journey lay. The gnarled and massive 
trunks cast long shadows, and the foliage rustled so gently 
in the soft evening breeze that one seemed rather to feel 
than to hear it. As I rode between these giants of the 
forest, sweet recollections of my distant home crept into 
my heart, and sunk in my thoughts. I let the reins fall on 
my horse's neck, who trotted steadily forward. I admired 
the marvelous variety of color that the rays of the setting 
sun produced as they shone through the masses of dark 
green leaves, and seemed to kindle their edges into flame. 
- .ddenly I was startled out of my reverie by a slight 
noise, which appeared to come from the undergrowth on 
either side of the road. Turning sharply round, I grasped 
my revolver, but in the same moment I received a stunning 
blow on the back 01 my head, which knocked me senseless 
from my saddle. Once more I recollect opening my eyes, 
and thinking that I could see indistinctly one of the escaped 
criminals bending over me. and then all became a blank. 

"It must have been late in the night when consciousness 
again returned to me. Slowly opening my eyes. I saw far 
above me the dark blue vault of the sky. and the full moon 
shining brightly. A dull, painful sensation at the back of 
my head prompted me to place my band there, and I then 
discovered that I was bound hand and foot. Gradually I 
collected my thoughts: I remembered cow the murderous 
attack in the forest, and a fearful foreboding flashed 
through my mind, which almost caused my heart to stand 
still. I felt that I was laid across two sharp parallel pro- 
jections, which cut into my shoulders and the back of my 
legs, causing me intense pain, and far below me I could 
hear the gentle plashing of water. 

"Heavens' there could no longer be any doubt: I was 
lying stretched across Cayuga Bridge, bound, incapable 
of moving an inch, with the hideous and absolutely certain 
prospect of being cut literally to pieces by the next train 



July 31, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



that passed. For the second time that night I almost 
swooned as I realized my situation; but by a powerful 
effort of will I recovered myself, and tugged desperately 
at the ropes that bound me until they cut almost into my 
muscles: 1 shrieked, and wept finally like a child. I made 
mad endeavors to roll myself into another position, and 
then recollected that a careless movement might precipi- 
tate me into the flood below — bound hand and foot, to sink 
like a stone! 

A shudder ran through my frame, and I lay motionless 
again; but not for long, for the light of the great — almost 
fearfully bright — moon overhead, the ripple of the water 
deep below me, the breeze that came in light puffs, and 
then died away again, giving place to a death-like stillness, 
occasionally broken by the scream of some distant night- 
bird — all was unbearable, and caused me the anguish of 
death. And then the rails! the rails! My thoughts were 
torturing me, and yet I could not escape them. The 
wooden beams of the bridge vibrated perceptibly from the 
movement of the water below, and I thought that I could 
already feel the approach of the train, and my hair 
bristled with the horror of it. The breeze now blew some- 
what stronger, and I imagined that I could already hear, 
far away in the distance, the puffing and panting of the 
locomotive, and my heart stood still, to beat with redoubled 
force the next moment. 

"There are certain things, gentlemen, which are 
absolutely incomprehensible to me: one of them is the fact 
that I was able to survive that night. One thought stood 
ever clear in my mind: I must endeavor by some means to 
shift my position — if possible, to one between the metals — 
if I did not wish, possibly even in the next moment, to be- 
come the prey of the most awful death one could conceive. 
And I succeeded! I strained every muscle, every sinew, 
till I could strain no more. I wound and twisted myself, 
and panted until I thought my head must burst, and after 
superhuman exertions, which appeared to last an eternity 
and perhaps lasted but a minute, I found myself in the 
hollow between the rails. 

"Was I saved? I had no time to consider that, or to 
rejoice over the fresh chance of life which was now offered 
to me, for my whole being concentrated itself in intent 
listening. Far away in the distance I could now hear — 
first of all indistinctly, and then gradually increasing as it 
drew nearer and nearer — the regular, monotonous pant- 
ing which heralds the approach of a locomotive. The fear- 
ful stillness of the night gave way, as each minute passed 
to the more fearful noise, to the clanking and thundering 
of the engine as it raced on towards me at the headlong 
speed of American trains. Now a thousand feet more — 
now five hundred — all the horrors of hell possessed me; 
but I lay without moving a muscle. Once, indeed, I tried 
to scream. I could no longer hear my own voice; how, 
then, could the people in the train be expected to hear me? 
And now for an immeasurably short space of time a blaze 
of light beat down upon me, and a blast of hot air rushed 
over me, then everything became dark, and I heard a 
thunder as if the heavens were crashing in. Close, quite 
close, at scarcely a hairbreadth's distance, rushed the 
enormous mass over me. I was saved! 

"Already half-unconscious, I was still sensible of a deaf- 
ening clattering and roaring above me, and I saw shadow- 
like masses flying past; still one more of deadly anguish — 
one of the coupling-hooks, hanging somewhat lower than 
the rest, had caught and dragged me several yards, tear- 
ing finally a large piece out of the breast of my coat — then 
all objects seemed to whirl around me, the moon, the 
bridge, and the lofty cliffs, in one mad dance, and I became 
insensible. 

"When I next woke, I found myself in my own bed, and 
around me well-known faces. And now to be brief; I had 
been found on the morning after that awful night by a 
platelayer who had recognized me, and had brought me 
back to Auburn. For a fortnight I lay delirious with 
brain fever, hovei ing between life and death; but my strong 
constitution pulled me through. The first time after my 
recovery that I had occasion to use a looking-glass, I saw 
what traces those moments had left on me." — From the 
German of Max Nordeau. 

Indigestion dies where Jackson's Napa Soda lives. 




MT. VERNON CO., Baltimore. 



The undersigned, having been appointed Agents for the 
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company, have now in store ; 

SAIL DUCK— ALL NUMBERS. 
HYDRAULIC-ALL NUMBERS. 
DRAPER AND WAGON DUCK. 

Prom 30 to 120 inches wide; and a complete assort mm t 
of all qualities 28%-inch duck, from 7 to 15 ozs., inclusive 
MURPHY, ORANT & CO. 



$1.25 fora 

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With fine Gold Pen Point. 

JOHN PARTRIDGE, 

Stationer. Printer, Bookbinder. 



IMPORTANT TO LAWYERS 

^=— BRIEFS 

Printed in a night if required. 
JOHN PARTRIDGE, 
Printer, 
306 California Street, S. F. 




"S'itliPfljV "W| I 

KEARNY STREET, Near Geary. 



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Establishment to 

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DO YOT EAT EGGS? THE . . . 

Pertect Egg Gutting Guide. 



Eat them from the shell 
They are best that way. 



Directs the blow so that a common table knife makes an opening the 
right size and always alike. Price by mail 35 cents. Address 

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SSB~ Descriptive circulars sent free telling the best way to cook and how 
to eat eggs. 

The BROOKS-FOLLIS ELECTRIC CO. 

Importers and Jobbers of ELECTPICAI 

523 Mission St. Tel. Main 861 SUPPLIES 

San Francisco, Cal 



Sells Burial Lots 
and Graves. 
Perpetual Care. 



LAUREL HILL 

Cemeteru 
Association 



Junction of Bush 
street and 
Central avenue, 
San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 31, 1897. 





tmurVEmm 



e 



"Klondyeitis " is now epidemic in San 

Hung y For More Francisco. The disease superinduced 

Gold. by hunger for gold has spread rapidly, 

and the rich as well as the poor have 
fallen victims to the malady. It used to be a common idea 
among the more credulous foreigners that the streets of 
San Francisco were paved with gold, and now in turn it 
has developed from among its inhabitants people who be- 
lieve that the ground at the new diggings is "strewn 
with nuggets," with, as one paper has put it, enough gold 
lying around to make thousands of men millionaires. It 
can only be hoped that these dreams will be realized to a 
degree that will suit the most avaricious. As a rule this 
new race of fortune hunters could not have been persuaded 
to put up a dollar on a decent California prospect; or, if 
they did, the investment would cause them sleepless nights. 
With one-half the free advertising that has done so much 
to make Alaska the rage, a boom could have been worked 
up at home which would have brought capital into Rands- 
burg and a hundred other bonanza camps now starving 
through lack of support from our monied classes, who are 
now showing that it is not the absence of greed which 
kept their money bags tied up when an appeal for assist- 
ance was made by some deserving California mine owner. 
Most of the residents of this portion of Alaska are now 
traveling to more temperate climes to spend the winter 
months, and yet the "rushers" are afoot in the hope of 
heading off the cooler-headed and more practical crowd 
which will be making their way northward in the early 
spring. The exodus has been a benefit in its way to the 
shipping men and merchants of this city, who have been 
reaping a golden harvest one way or the other. For that 
let us be thankful while awaiting the advent of the millions 
about to be shoveled up by the adventurers, if one-half the 
stories told are true. 

Russia is not alone now in the secret of 

Siberia A the rich gold deposits of the north. For 

Veritable Mint, over a century the Imperial treasury 

has been repleted from time to time by 
the enormous yield of quartz and placer mines, the extent 
of which has never yet been revealed. The nation has 
never derived any benefit from the gold recovered; all 
has gone to the reigning Czar as one of his royal perqui- 
sites. It is only of late that permission has been given to 
subjects who were desirous of penetrating further north 
and through the interior of Siberia, which has, so far, 
proved a perfect mint wherever mining has been at- 
tempted. Within the past month a company was formed 
in St. Petersburg, with a capital of 12,000,000 roubles, to 
work mines at Katchga, in the Government of Orenburg, 
and it is said that in future operations of the kind will be 
encouraged as much as possible by the Imperial govern- 
ment. Siberia itself is to be thoroughly explored at the 
expense of the government, and, among other engineers 
retained for the purpose, is Mr. C. F. Hoffman, formerly 
of California. The new discoveries in Alaska within the 
same parallels of latitude are, for this reason, not surpris- 
ing, while the success already attained in one quarter cer- 
tainly justifies the hope that a no less happy result will 
obtain in the other. 

Among the more notable passengers for 
A Verv Nice the Yukon on the steamship Excelsior, 
Appointment, was Douglas Waterman, son of August 
Waterman, the well-known mining secre- 
tary of this city. Mr. Waterman goes north under en- 
gagement with the Alaska Commercial Company in charge 
of their interests in the mining line. From the fact that 
this company has a happy faculty of always selecting the 
best material for service at its northern stations, the ap- 
pointment of young Mr. Waterman speaks for itself. He 
leaves many warm friends behind him here, who will be 
only too pleased to hear of his success, which is certain in 
the employ of a company which never yet has failed to re- 
ward officials of recognized integrity and ability. 



With business improving all over the 
Mining stocks State, and wheat climbing the golden 
Now Reviving, stair by jumps, it is only natural that 

the speculative mining market should 
respond, and a boom in stocks will not obstruct the wave 
of prosperity when it sweeps over the country. On the 
contrary, it will help to swell the surging tide as it carries 
fortune thioughout the West. The indications just now 
are such £.s to warrant the expression of belief that better 
times are in store for the shareholders in the Comstock- 
Brunswick Companies, almost worn out in the struggle to 
pay assessments, and make both ends meet at the same 
time. The men who have been tearing down for years 
past what others have been building up, have had a good 
opportunity to escape perdition. A sudden upheaval in 
prices would have caught the gang short to an extent 
which would have meant ruin for a great many speculators 
who have had out thousands of shares of the leading mines 
for months at a time. Most of these shorts have been 
filled, so that no important failures need be looked for in 
case a boom does materialize before winter. Sierra Ne- 
vada has been the king-pin of the movement so far. Some 
good ore cut on the Layton tunnel, and a hopeful condi- 
tion of affairs on the 900, has served to Keep the stock 
active at an advance, which took the price up to $1.50 in 
the early portion of the week. The south end mines, 
while firmer, have been rather quiet under a light de- 
mand, traders for the time seeming to concentrate their 
attention on Sierra Nevada. The same might be said of 
the rest of the market, although occasional spurts have 
taken values well out of the old rut, even if they did not 
hold. A lively season of trading on Pine street would do 
much to ameliorate the misfortune of those who linger be- 
hind the caravan now en route for the Yukon. Mexican 
and Crown Point were assessed during the week, the one 
20 and the other 111 cents. 

Mining is still carried on in several parts of 
Mining in California, and with some success. There 
California, are still a goodly number of folksleft who are 

satisfied to pin their fortunes on properties 
in this State; finding the money necessary to carry on work 
independent of outside capital. The promoter is happily 
conspicuous by his absence, and the ill-omened touts and 
fakirs, who haunt the hotel corridors, find other matters 
to talk about than the millions at their command for the 
ready purchase of the inevitable " going concern." The 
news of sales has been scarce of late. The London and 
Paris markets are not developing much interest in Cali- 
fornia properties, and this need not occasion much sur- 
prise when the reason is taken into consideration. Now 
and then an attempt is made to rake in subscribers by 
that class of the London broker who lives by floating com- 
panies for stock-jobbing purposes, and for the profit made 
in rigging the share market. One or two of these little 
schemes are being hatched here, but when the proper 
time arrives the sawdust will be dropped out of the doll's 
body. It is said that the French have an eye on the 
Utica again, and that the property will shortly be ex- 
amined by an expert representing capitalists in that 
country. But then they say a great many things now-a- 
days true and untrue. In Tuolumne County the industry 
is active, as usual, with some wonderful results reported 
in the way of a bullion yield from the leading mines. The 
returns from placers alone in the four northern counties of 
California, during the past twelve months, ranged from 
$500,000 to $1,000,000, and tbe yield will be still greater 
this year. The great trouble is these deposits are too 
near home. True, indeed, is the saying that distance lends 
enchantment to the view. 

The vagaries of the tariff discussion 

Local Stocks In kept the local sugar stocks lively for 

Demand. some weeks past, and the people who 

got in early have been able to make 

some money. As the men in control of these shares have 

too much to do in other ways than manipulating stocks, 

and there is no one else well enough provided with shares 

to work the game, speculation is not a very strong feature 

of business in the Board. Other securities have been 

well patronized of late, showing how plentiful money is 

with a certain class who have neither to toil nor spin for a 

livelihood. 



July 31, 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'3 




• He»r the Crier:" "What the devil art thout' 
'Onethat wlllolav the devil, air. with you." 



THE only profession not in dauger of being overcrowded 
at the North Pole is, strangely enough, the ministry. 
Why are our clergy so backward in coming forward at this 
exciting juncture? Are they unwilling to freeze their soles 
while reclaiming souls? We could easily spare some of the 
shining theological lights hereabouts to illumine darkest 
Alaska. There is the Reverend Edwards Davis, for in- 
stance, the dress-suit actor-preacher; and Dr. Blowhard 
of Alameda, whose mouth emits a cannon roar of gospel if 
he but opens it. 60 to, brethren. Go to — Alaska. 

SERGEANT Mahoney of the Harbor Police is entitled 
to his salary, which he is obviously trying to earn. 
He is after the scalps of certain Market-street merchants 
for flagrant breach of law in obstructing the sidewalks 
near the ferry with trunks, b'arrels, and other impedi- 
ments which the luckless ferry passenger has either to 
bark his shivering shins against or play leap-frog over. 
The pedestrians have broken their legs and the mer- 
chants the law; but it is clear the merchants have the 
best of it. 

WHILE the present disturbances and complications in 
local school circles are at their height, Alameda 
County is having a tempest in its own educational teapot. 
Professor Cornelius B. Bradley has blacklisted the High 
Schools for lamentable deficiency in English, and the 
teachers, to a man and woman, are on their ear in conse- 
quence. Why did Prof. Cornelius give the pupils "Snow- 
bound," anyway? Why so slight home bards? What's 
the matter with J. W. Dutton's Endeavor Ode? 

NOW comes Attorney McNab with the statement that 
Chief Deputy Louis Loupe, badly wanted as a witness 
in the trial of his client, ex-Collector Welburn, is faking 
his present illness as a means of dodging the important 
issues at stake. 

It is not strange that Mr. Loupe 

Should hesitate to come to court, 
For should it land him in the soup, 

His time and cash would both be short. 

MRS. Mary G. Jones of this State, known as " the 
mother of the American Railway Union." is on her 
way to intercede with President McKinley in behalf of 
that precious rascal, train-wrecker S. D. Worden. Had 
Worden's diabolical plans carried, and Mrs. Jones were 
the "mother" of sons and daughters sent thereby to a 
ghasllyldeatb, she might be as anxious now to hang this 
law-breaker as she is to save him. 

BARON FOY, the young nobleman with a horrible 
hatred for water, who was quarantined aboard ship 
at Angal Island for three whole days without so much as a 
suissesse to relieve his thirst, thinks he was inhumanly 
treated. The Crier hopes that war with Prance will 
not be precipitated by thjs unfortunate and unhappy in- 
cident. Can't the Baron be bought off or filled up on 
something to keep him quiet ? 

MAYOR Phelan's praiseworthy attempt to save the 
city $250 per month by dispensing with the luxury of 
an assistant District Attorney, an office which exists prac- 
tically in name only, has been ignored by the Supervisors. 
The City Fathers evidently are of the opinion that they 
were not elected to protect the treasury but to deplete it 
as systematically as possible. 

SIX suicides per day has been the average amount of 
business transacted at the morgue this week, the 
cases, not the cadavers, being in evidence. Dull trade 
elsewhere makes lively trade in Dunbar Alley. 

COMMANDER Booth-T-ucker's plan of colonizing the 
poor near the Indian reservations may result in the 
scalping of the entire poverty-stricken band. A novel 
but efficacious way of solving the industrial problem. 

SIX good men were sacrificed in the Reno smashup by 
rail the other day, before which event they were good 
for nothing. The noble six are Indians. And dead ones. 



INTEMPERANCE is the latest charge tiled against 
that erratic pedagogue in petticoats, Mistress Craven, 
it being averred that she loved herb. ands. not wisely but 
too well; that at the Cliff House recently she callnl solouflli 
and long for her favorite beverage that the kegs went 
empty, and even the sympathetic seals felt dry. 

Yet still does blithesome Nettie not despair 

Of being proven Mrs. .lames O. Fair. 

Metbinks the surest, kindest wny to down her 

Is just to let her drink enough to drown her. 

REVEREND J. George Gibson, who has earned more 
distinction as the spiritual adviser of a gentleman 
named Durrant than as a preacher, says that women do 
not express their religion in the same way as do men. 
George is right this time. A man simply pungles up the 
pew-money and stays away, and a woman adorns the pew 
with her best clothes. 

SIXTY men in blue are to be despatched Alask award 
to keep the boundary lines and mines. By the time 
the gold-mad explorers now joining the Klondyke hegira 
have experienced a winter's sojourn in that mosquito and 
ice-ridden portion of earth, Uncle Sam's men will not be 
the only blue ones as to spirits and noses. 'Twill be a sur- 
vival of the richest. 

S NOTED English expert on brain diseases has just 
discovered that the brain has a trick of sleeping in 
sections, different brain centers going off duty in turn. 
Now we know what really ailed poor old Sutro, who was 
apparently off pretty much all the time. He was not 
dead, but merely sleeping. Science has at last unveiled 
the mystery. 

TWO women of the adventuress type, claiming to be 
Californians, after making no end of a row in a Chicago 
hotel, have been dumped into jail, where they belong. Time 
is a great adjuster. We may yet hear that one Brown, 
also an adventurer hailing from long-suffering California, 
has found fitting quarters in a Chicago jail. 

POLICE Commissioner Mose Gunst greatly incon- 
venienced the burglar contingent when he safe-de- 
posited his valuables before going to Yurrup. What a 
pity that the municipal swag cannot be as securely stowed 
away beyond the reach of elected gentry with light- 
fingered proclivities! 

" T_]THAT do Mr. Welburn's initials, O. M., stand for?" 
Jni — Fair Correspondent. 

I really canot tell you, dearie, 

The answer to your harmless query. 

The gay Collector's life is such 

That they may mean, perhaps, Owe Much. 

THE diary of Nels Sorenson, ex-motorman, now miner, 
detailing his hazardous trip from Dyea to Dawson, is 
a lesson to reporters as regards brevity and truth. The 
latter virtues are, however, regarded as vices by the em- 
barking representatives of yellow journalism. 

THE Eastern reporter simply isn't in it as a detective. 
He has allowed the Bradburys to disappear. The val- 
iant key-hole workers of our local press would never permit 
such a suspicion of genteel regard for ordinary civilities of 
life to stain their records. 

INSANE asylums with jail accommodations are a neces- 
sity of the future, if criminals of the gentleman stamp 
continue to plead disordered brains as the cause of their 
thievish operations in positions of public and private trust. 

FASTOR Boynton's farewell words of advice to his flock 
this week were : " Hold fast that which thou hast that 
no man take it." It is supposed that the astute gentle- 
man referred principally to salaries and wives. 
IF many more officials relinquish their posts to vamoose 
the country on a gold hunt, the spectacle may yet be 
presented us in this lonely locality of the office seeking the 
man. 

AN undignified professional row between opposing coun- 
sel is what the Craven-deed case has resolved itself 
into. Judge Slack's desire to retire when the wrangling is 
over is not surprising. 

THE only rich men who need fear no danger from hav- 
ing their legs pulled are those who stump about on 
wooden ones. 



'4 



SAN FRANXISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 31, 1897. 




SSglfii 



PLAINT OF A FIN DE SIECLE ARIADNE -rw fohsakeh. 



M 



ON bien ainn\ of the dark gray eye, 

Who many women have loved ere tbis, 
Some words must be said ere the word good-bye— 

Ere lips respond to the farewell kiss. 
Since few are the moments left to me, 
Have the grace to give them willingly. 

What ri^ht have I to claim as my own 

A tender love that shall know no wane, 

Since other sweethearts more dear have known 
And wept the loss of your strong arms' strain ? 

What chance have I with a man like yoo 

Whom beautiful women have not made true? 

I gave you all that I had— a heart— 

And you gave the fullest return, 
In your tireless passion a little part 

Whose memories evermore shall burn. 
And now your gray eyes do not spare 
The damning news you have ceased to care ! 

Well, at the worst one can cry "Amen! " 

The game was short, but the candle's worth ! 

What's ended for me will begin again 

For some blest woman upon this earth. 

So, proud-lipped rover, I give you up, 

But first let us taste of this parting cup. 

Toyourfuture fancies I drink this toast. 

The toast of a woman who must give way; 

Since you are so tickle, then make the most 
Of the rushing hours of life's short day, 

But e'er the guest at your love feasts be 

That foe of lovers, Satiety ! 



UNBELIEF-— coward bulwer lytton. 

There is no unbelief; 

Whoever plants a seed beneath the sod, 

And waits to see it push away the clod. 

He trusts in (iod. 

Whoever says, the clouds are in the sky, 
"Be patient, heart, light breaketh by-and-bye," 
Trusts the Most High. 
Whoever sees 'neath Winter's friend of snow 
The silent harvest of the future grow, 
God's power must know. 

Whoever lies down on his couch to sleep. 
Content to lock each sense in slumber deep, 

Knows God will keep. 
Whoever says, "Tomorrow,'' "The Unknown," 
" The future," trusts the Power alone 

He dares disown. 
The heart that looks on when eyelids close, 
And dares to live when life has only woes, 

God's comfort knows. 

There is no unbelief, 

And day by day, and night, unconsciously, 
The heart that lives by faith the lips deny, 
God knoweth why! 

EYES THAT CANNOT WEEP ,-BUA higqin&on, in poems. 

The saddest eyes are those that cannot weep ; 

The loneliest breast the one that sobbeth not; 

The lips and mind that are most parched and hot 
Are those that cannot pray, and cannot sleep,— 
It is the silent grief that sinketh deep. 

To weep out sorrow is the common lot.— 

To weep it out and let it be forgot,— 
But tears and sobs are after all but cheap. 
We weep for worries, frets and trifling cares, 

For toy we've broken, and for hopes that were, 
And fancied woes of passing love affairs. 

But only One can ease the breast of her 
Whose hurt for fruitless moans has sunk too deep. 
Pity, O God, the eyes that cannot weep. 



CITY INDEX AND PURCHASER'S GUIDE 

RESTAURANTS. 
Bergez's Restaurant, Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street, below Mont- 
gomery. Rooms for ladies and families; private entrance. John Bergez 
Proprietor. 
Matson Tortoni, French Rotlsserte, 111 O'Farrell street. Private dining 

rooms and banquet hall. S. Constantlnl, Proprietor- 
Poodle Dog Restaurant, S. E. cor. Grant ave. and Bush st. Private 

dining and banquet rooms, Tel. 429. A. B. Blanco & B. Brcn 

DENTISTS. 
Dr. Franklin Pancoast removed to 20 O'Farrell street, rooms 16, 17 & 2fl 

MEDICAL. 
Dr. Hall, 14 McAllister St., near Jones. Diseases of women and child re d 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
Hawaiian Stamps a specialty. MAKINS & CO 506 Market street. 
Selections on approval: any place in world. W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannar. 
The W. H. Hollls Stamp Co., (Incorporated), 105 O'Farrell St.,S. F. 

BOILER MAKERS. 
P. F. Dundon's San Francisco Iron Works, 314, 316, and 318 Main street 
Iron Work of every description designed and constructed. 

CANDIES. 
MaMiard's Chocolates In H and 1-lb boxes. Roberts', Polk and Bush. 

LADIES' HAIR DRESSING. 
Hermann Schwarze (known as Hermann at Strozynskl's) has opened 
Ladies" Hair Dressing Parlors at 211 Powell st. Telephone Main 5a20 



BANKING. 



Bank of British Columbia. 

Southeast Cor. Bosh and Sansome Sts. 
Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

Capital Paid Up 13,000,000 

Reserve Fund f 500,000 

HEAD OFFICE 60 LOMBARD STREET, London 

Branches— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster. Kamloops, Nai.- 
lamo, Nelson, Sandon, and Kaslo, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon 
This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available In all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon Its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows : 

New York— Merchants 1 Bank of Canada ; Chic ago— Firs t Na tlonal Bank ; 
Li vbrpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen 
Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; 
South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and 
New Zealand — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company or 
Sydney, Ld ; Deheraka and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

The ftnglo-Galifornian Bank, Limited. 

Capital authorized •0,000,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 

Paid Up l,500,uou 

Reserve Fund 700,000 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts 
Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman &, Co., 21 Broad street. 

The Bank transacts a General Banking Business, sella drafts, makes 

telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the 

world. Sends bill** for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 

and bullion. IGN. STEINHART \ Mftnft4rftrs 

P.N. LILIENTHaL f Mana 6*erB 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 

No. 526 California Street. San Francisco 
Guarantee capital and surplus — $2.0(0.201 60 
Capital actually paid up In casta.. 1.000000 00 

Deposits December 31, 1896 27,7a0.24? 45 

OFFICERS: President, B.A.Becker; First Vice-President, Daniel 
Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier, A. H. R Schmidt: 
Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary. George Tourny; Assist- 
ant Secretary, A. H. Muller: Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: B A.Becker. Daniel Meyer. H Horst- 
mann. Ign. Steinhart, N. Van Bergen, E. Rohte, H B. Russ, D. N. 
Walter and N. Ohlandt 

Wells Fargo & Go.'s Bank. 

N. E. Corner Sansome & Sutter Streets 

John J. Valentine President 

Homer S. King Manager 

H. Wads worth Cashier 

F. L. Ltpman Assistant Cashier 

Cash Capital and Surplus W.850,000 

BRANCHES. 
N. Y. City.H. B. Parsons. Cashier. | Salt Lake City, J. E. Dooly, Cashier 
Directors— John J. Valentine, Benj. P. Cheney, Oliver Eldrldge, Henry 

E. Huntington. Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, Charles 

F. Crocker, Dudley Evans. 

Security Savings Bank. 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Bdildino. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 

LOANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 
William Alvord s L. Abbott, Jr. H.H.Hewlett 

Wm. Babcock O.D.Baldwin E J McCutchen 

Adam Grant w. S Jones J. B. Lincoln 



July 31, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



15 




BANKING. 



Oh, 1 just love these salted almonds, 

Jessie did to me confide. 
Oh, that I were an almond salted! 

To sweet Jessie I replied. 
Ah, if you were an almond even, 

Replieth Jessie to my bluff, 
They, I'm sure, would never salt you, 

For there isn't salt enough. — Exchange. 

Lady of the House — Did you post my letter, as I told you, 
Bridget? Bridget — Sure, mum, I did — but I had it 
weighed first, and as it was double weight, I put another 
stamp on it. Lady — That's right; only I hope you didn't 
put the extra stamp on so that it would obliterate the ad- 
dress? Bridoet — Indeed, I didn't, mum — I just stuck it 
on top of the other stamp, mum, so as to save room! — Tid- 
Bits. 

In a Western town, a clergyman was exhorting his con- 
gregation in regard to their treatment of the new 
minister, soon to arrive, and closed up with: "And above 
all things, when he gets here I want you all to pray for 
him. He'll need it." — Life. 

Mother — What did your father say when he saw his 
broken pipe ? Innocent — Shall I leave out the wicked 
words, mamma? Mother — Certainly. Innocent — Then I 
don't believe there is anything to tell you, mamma. — Odds 
and Ends. 

"You shouldn't ride alone so far," he said tenderly. 
"You should always have somebody to go with you and 
guard you." "Haven't I my mud guard?" she cried flip- 
pantly, as she hopped into her saddle. — Cleveland Plain 
Dealer. 

Lord Stonybroke — It's time, Clarence, that you were 
thinking about a career. Dutiful Son — I will be guided 
by you, father. Shall I take orders, study for the bar, 
enter the army, or marry an American? — Odds and Ends. 
I "watched the contour of her head— 
We rode the steed of steel. 
" Wheel you be mine ? " I softly said; 
She softly said, " I wheel." 

—Cleveland Plain Dealer. 
Madge — I think Jack is going to propose to me soon, 
mamma. Her Mother — Why do you say that? Madge 
— He took me out to look at some tandem wheels last 
evening. — Philadelphia North American. 

Mr. Benham — I wish I were single again. Mrs. Benham 
- -You horrid wretch. What would you do if you were? 
Mr. Benham — Marry you again. Mrs. Benham — Oh, you 
darling creature. — Modern Society. 

"They had a telephone at the farmhouse where I went 
this summer." "What did they use it for?" "They tele- 
phoned to town every day for fruits, butter and fresh 
eggs." — Chicago Record. 

"I'm not so big a fool as Hook, doncherknow," remarked 
young Mr. Willie Boy to Miss Point Breeze. "Is it possi- 
ble?" replied that young lady incredulously. — Pittsburg 
Chronicle Telegraph. 

She — I am quite sure you had too much champagne when 
you called on me yesterday afternoon. He — Yes; I thought 
I'd just look around to-day to see if I was engaged to you. 
— Collier's Weekly. 

Miss Autumn — I hope to have a good time at the mas- 
querade. Miss Caustique — Well, you'll have as good a 
chance as any of the girls, as you'll be wearing a mask. — 
Odds and Ends. 

Swain's bakery at 213 Sutter street has for years been held as the 
standard of excellence in this city. This splendid restaurant serves 
a first-class dinner— first-class in service, in quality, good-taste and 
refined attention, between the hours of 5 and 8 o'clock every day for 
$1.00. The best dinner in the city. Also fine pastries, confections 
and candies promptly supplied. 



Jackson's Napa Soda kills malaria. 



California Safe Deposit and Trust GomDanu. 

Cor. California and Montgomery sis. 

Capital Fully Paid * 1,000,000 

Transacts a general banking business 
and allows Interest on deposits payable on demand or after notice. 

Aots as Executor, Administrator, and Trustee under wills or In any 
other trust capacity. Wills are drawn by the company's attorneys and 
are taken care of without charge. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES to rent at prices from $5 per annum up- 
ward according to size, and valuables of all kinds are stored at low rates. 

Directors: J. D. Fry, Henry Williams, I. G. Wiokersham. Jacob C. 
Johnson, James Tread well, F. W. Lougee. Henry F. Fortmann, R B. Wal- 
lace. R. D. Fry, A. D. Sharon, and J. Dalzell Brown. 

Officers: J. D Fry, President; Henry Williams. Vice-President; R. 
D. Fry, Second Vice-President; J. Dalzell Brown, Secretary and Treas- 
urer; E E, Shotwell, Assistant Secretary; Gunnison, Booth & Bartnett, 
Attorneys. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

33 Post Street, below Kearny, 
Mechanics' Institute Building 

Guaranteed Capital *1 .000,000 

Paid-Up Capital I 300,000 

JAMES D. PHELAN. President. S. G. MURPHY, Vioe-President. 

JOHN A. HOOPER, Vice-President. 
Directors— James D. Phelan, L. P. Drexler, John A. Hooper, C. G. 
Hooker, James Mofflt, S. G. Murphy, Frank J. Sullivan, Robert MoElroy, 
and Joseph D. Grant. 

Interest paid on Term and Ordinary Deposits. Loans on approved se- 
curities. GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co. , or Exchange 
on City Banks, When opening accounts send signatuie. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

Corner California and Webb Streets. 

Deposits. Deo. 31, 1895 124,^02,337 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus. . . . 1,575,631 
ALBERT MILLER, President | E. B. POND, Vice-President 
Directors— Thomas Magee.G. W. Beaver, Philip Barth, Daniel E. Mar- 
tin, W. C. B. De Fremery, George C. Boardmato, Robert Watt; Lovell 
White, Cashier. 

Receives Deposits, and Loans only on real estate security. Country 
remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by check of reliable 
parties, payable in San Franoisco, out the responsibility of this Savings 
Bank commences only with the aetual receipt of the money. The signature 
of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for 

fiass-book or entrance fee. Office hours— 9. A. m. to 3 P. m. Saturday even- 
ngs,6:30to8. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited. 

N.W. Cor. Sansomb & Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 

Paid Up Capital 12,000.000 

Reserve Fund t 850,000 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

AGENTS— New York— Agency of the London, Paris, and American 
Bank Limited, No. 10 Wall Street, N. Y. Paris— Messrs. Lazard, Freres 
& Cle, 17 Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the 
world. Commercial and Travelers 1 Credits Issued. 

g IG A L G T B slt^ APM }"»°»^»- 

Grocker-Woolworth National Bank of S. F. 

Corner Market, Montgomery, 

and Post Streets. 

Pald-Up Capital 11,000,000 

WM. H. CROCKER President 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President 

GEO. W.KLINE Cashier 

Directors— Chas. F. Crocker, E. B. Pond, Hy. J. Crocker, Geo. W. Scott 

The Sather Banking Company. 

Successor to Sather & Co. 
Established 1851, San Franeiseo. 

Capital $1,000,000 

James K. Wilson President. Albert Miller, Vice-President 

L. I, Cowqill. Cashier. F. W. Wolfe, Secretary. 

Directors— C. S. Benedict, E G. Lukens, F. W. Sumner, Albert Mil 
ler Wm. P. Johnson, V. H. Metcalf, James K. Wilson. 

Agents : New York — J. P. Morgan & Co. Boston— National Bank of the 
Commonwealth. Philadelphia— Drexel & Co. Chicago — Continental Na- 
tional Bank. St. Louis— The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First Na- 
tional Bank. London— Brown, Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co 

Bank of California, San Francisco. 

Capital and Surplus, $6,000,000 

WILLIAM ALVORD President I CHARLES R. BISHOP. . Vlce-Pres't 

ALLEN M.CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. Prentiss Smith.... Ass't Cashier 1 1. F. Moulton 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS. 

New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston— The Tremont Na- 
tional Bank; Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Union National 
Bank. Philadelphia— National Bank of the Republic St. Louis — Boat- 
man's Bank. Virginia City (Nev.)— Agency of The Bank of California. 
London— Messrs. N. M, Rothschild & Sons; Paris— Messrs. de Roths- 
child Freres. BERLiN—Dlreotion der Disconto Gesellsohaft. China, 
Japan and East Indies— Chartered Bank of India. Australia and China. 
Australia and New Zealand — The Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and 
Bank of New Zealand. 
Let ters of Credit Issued available in all parts of the world. 



rf 



:5CO NEWS LETTER. 



July 31. 1897. 



• • 3 . = -'•:- = 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 



D. MAXWELL the ■ 
thai 



I =•:• *•? : 



He and - re underwriters by Ms Mcrpictstaao cf 
■enl nconaoM of tbe Or£ Code reUticg totheocuga- 

fcuwi ri * Bomber of lavs that bam never been en- 

Tfee FidefitT aad Casualty of New York, has added a 

r. J. Dtnarrl an* ken aiyianhnl wjuiailltadint if 

1 --.-.- - Ac ndcCtj MatoB A,: H aiii l i fiw ■:<? ata eft* 
with headojaarters at Mawackee. 

Clarence M . Santa, of tbe Northwestern Mutoal Lie. 
wC be boo frrcn 1 avowA l sail to tie borne ofc.e o>! :-= 



■ naa 




Fax and M i ma Inirawcc Agents. 
Ill ? > n a n 9L Saa Fwcan. Ca 



t. ocxHAjf a Baton 



INSURANCE. 



Ptre OnVec § at Ca s t * . 



J 
Omaw 

A. McLaae. aaaaager of the New York Lite, is caarp- 
a*r with hi* faaawj in the redwoods. 

Ja-nes J. Dennis goes to Salt Lake as special ageat of 
the Hartford Fire's tushuat ia Utah. Montana aad Idaho. 

B. B BroBweS, a promiseat a tirwc* aaaa from Ta- 
eoasa. risited the cit t last week. 

The Baaken' Mot ual Life , of Dearer. CoL. has beea de- 

--•..'•.' ■—.-■■ : :. '■ ■--■.:■-■ v 2 

-• .- •-. " ■ : 

The execotire committee of the A. P. A. have entered 
-v 1- trraageaasal aith bat BaateraMataa afCanaden 
to furnish auonace to the ■e mber s of that order 
at reduced rates. The Eastera Motoal is a aaaall affair, 
■1 •_. ,, -. i- -. •■ i . i: - a----.- 

Tnaiaa has received the appointment of special 
agent fnr the Helvetia Swiss Iasoraace Company. 
IV Fiustsa - Fund has eatered Ma*jnaipfi 
The preawaa income of the Motoal Life, of New York. 

• 
B'J. Smith, asanstaat manager of the Bobert Dickson 
agency, has gone to Hartford, where 1— m has it he is to 
be given a department ia the Cocnectieut I nsuia nce Com- 



HAKIXE. am DTLAXD 

Rremans Fund 



-_■-. ■■ 5 ::: ::: 



s- :.: ::: 



PALATINE 



cm atajscansnat. EnoLifn 



soud atcoaiTT ovca *-. 

cbas. a. La tot 



RESOURCES 

m_s.r. 



InsnraDce Goapaii ot Nortt ftierica 



at Hamas, of tbe home office of the New 
Zealand Fire, is on the Coast, aad wD visit the iasoraaee 
ceaters of that country "ilh a view of ex tending the bonv 

nm *' * -- so --*"- T 
P. B Armstrong tbe Cal-orcia fret grower and 

IheMei antfleand Gaaraatec L vjdi of . x "r» Tort « 
underwriter aad basiaeas maaager. 

The r re Underwriters' Assoc atioo of the Pacific Coast 
has adopted icaahiti oa * c ompnmcat ary to thesussoij of 
C. Hx* 



J AXES Ot BaXLKT. 



.; s 7 



COMECTICUT FIRE IMURUCE CO. OF HARTFORD. 



ic» 



F t nfc ii — 1 teE toc a ana aerer appreciates his wife till 
be trets into trouble. Ct- 
isfarliria to hare soaae one to Maair for it. —Life. 



BOYD . WCWO«, S F.AgMts.50iM«rtgomerySt 

PHOFJLX A88URAHCE CO. OF LONDON 

rH0¥I0FJCE-W*8HI"GT0« N8URAIICE CO. 




: i-m SAX90ME ST . s r 

.OSS OffiCRADi OO.fwmlllllllll 



tMnkJaahnai aaaawahafan 



Uwal 7 1. :«..-. 1... ihiMaasaaaaai a- ar « 

THE IMPERIAL ?5S£^&&Zttt£~ 

WILLIAM J UXOEii trmtHmt Kmpr 

ttihi la—ia rsarst— »8l8mHi»h o^. 



July 31, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I. UTTER. 



'7 



|M4***MniiiMiiiniin*>iMtiutMt ± 

MOME DECORATION- 



Delft furniture should be used iu rooms where the full 
idea of coloring in blue and white is to be carried out. It 
is upholstered in denim, with seat portions and coverings 
embroidered in white in a lace pattern, and it is very 
artistic. Screens are now to be had in blue and white 
showing landscape decorations in Delft blue on a white 
ground: the screens having embroidered pictures consist- 
ing of designs embroidered in white or blue denim. All the 
bedroom furnishings consisting of bed, dresser, toilet 
table, washstand, cheval irlass. occasional table and clothes 
tree, are to be had in Delft blue and white, and toilet 
wares in the same color can be had to match. Blue mat- 
tings in harmony with the Delft blue and white continue in 
popular favor and are much used, as are also cotton and 
jute rugs in these colors. Denim as floor covering still 
holds its own. 

The use of burlap in the decoration of walls has of late 
been very extensive and it offers a most excellent foun- 
dation for decorative treatment, as it may be painted or 
stained in any color. Much of it is decorated like tapestry or 
the surface is pleasantly varied by the method of weaving 
the fabric. 

A cozy corner may be arranged in a simple way by 
placing a grille the depth of the paper frieze diagonally 
across it. Hang two full draperies of blue and white 
Japanese crape close to the lower edge of the grille, and 
loop them back at one or both sides, as you prefer. With 
the easy-chair and book-shelves you will need only a 
bracket reading-lamp and footstool or floor-cushion to 
make it an inviting retreat. 

A useful and artistic hall bench is made by covering any 
suitable box with cheap material like jute, into which 
brass nails are driven, according to some simple design. 

In the morning or other living rooms, it is well to keep 
the colors for the walls and woodwork generally light and 
cheerful. In the dining-room we expect to find them rich. 
The library should suggest retirement, and have a dark, 
but quiet, appearance. You may get a good soft green, 
that may be used in large quantities without being staring. 

Pale tints and delicate, indefinite patterns have had 
their day as far as wall paper is concerned. The new 
papers are decided both in color and design, and the ten- 
dency is toward larger patterns than formerly. 

As a matter of fact, one needs to study mere style in 
wall paper very little. Not only are there few people who 
are willing to make their houses uninhabitable for a month 
or more yearly, even where expense is not considered, for 
the sake of keeping up with the fashion of wall paper, but 
the change is seldom rendered desirable by the common- 
ness of any one style. New designs are being continually 
put on the market, and no one pattern gains sufficient 
vogue to make it a standard style. One can therefore 
choose without fear the paper one desires to live with for 
a term of years, secure that if a change of wall covering is 
made often enough to satisfy the demands of hygiene, 
there is no danger of the paper in use growing too old- 
fashioned. 

Very cheap papers should be avoided, for they are apt 
to fade dismally. It is an excellent plan to have a roll of 
paper sent home and a breadth pinned up on the wall be- 
fore deciding finally on it. The light of the room and the 
color of the woodwork change the effect very much from 
what it appears in the store. This is particularly true of 
ingrain paper, both figured and plain. We have recently 
heard some complaint of the opacity and lack of shade in 
the plain ingrain paper. There is no doubt that where 
there are large wall spaces to cover and few ornaments 
the deadness is trying. It remains, however, the most 
satisfactory background for pictures and bric-a-brac in a 
small room. 

Novelties in Sterling Silver Seals, Wax Holders, Candlesticks, Blot- 
ters, Penholders, Erasers, etc. J. N. Brittain, Jeweler, 23 Geary street. 



OUR GREAT 



See Rome and die : drink Jackson's Napa Soda and live. 



Tbe Granular Effervescent Salts that cures headaches is Bromo Kola. 



Stock' TJa/cing 
Sacrifice Oa/e- 

NOW IN PROGRESS. 
EVERYTHING AT- 



3'orcintj~oui {Prices. 

See Daily Papers for Particulars. 




MURPHY BUILDING, Market and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

203 to 207 N Spring St. bet. Temple and First St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



W. M. RAMSEY, 



121 Montgomery St., 

Opposite Occidental Hotel. 



Merchant 
Tailor, 



Williams Brothers. 
TAILORS. 



( Successors to Thomas 8. Williams ) 

111 Sutter Street, Lick House Block 
San Francisco 



If you have any doubt, consult the 

IS YOU R i California Title Insurance and Trust Go. 

T* I T* I F Insurance policies guaranteeing titles to be 

**~_ perfect issued and abstracts made and con- 

PFRFF(?T V i tinued. Money to loan on real estate. 

i i_i\i i_vy i i Office— Mills Building. 

Chas. Page, Fres,; Howard E. Wright, Secty; A, J, Cabmany, Mgr, 



HD RlPOPrV^ RESTORATIVE FILLS.— Buy none but the genu- 
UV\. mvxwm-' o ine— Aspeolfio for Exhausted Vitality. Physical, 
Debility, Wasted Forces. Approved by the Academy of Medicine, PariB, 
and the medical celebrities. Agents for California and the Pacific States. 
J. G. STEELE & CO., 635 Market street (Palace Hotel), San Francisco. 
Sent by mail or express anywhere. 

PRICES REDUCED-Box of 50 pills, SI 25; of lOO pills, »2; of 800 pills, 
$3 50; of 400 pills, 86; Preparatory Pills IS. Send for clroular. 



Baldness 



Scientific treatment of Hair and 
Scalp diseases at our parlors. 
Dr. White's New Hair Grower a 
positive cure for baldness. 



Dreisbach & Arms, Agents 

311 Emporium Building 

Free treatise on application. 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 3f, 1897 






ftNOTHER midsummer jinks has been added to the re- 
cords of Bohemia. Aud now the one has moved from 
the forest, and sad embers mark the places where Bo- 
hemia's camp fires lately blazed. Both High and Low 
Jinks were excellent, and the ballet dancing in the latter 
would have been a triumph on any stage. The damming 
up of the big pool has made a fine lake for boating and 
swimming. Here on the morning succeeding the Jinks 
stood Mr. Downey Harvey aud Mr. Herman Oelrichs on 
the brink of the shining pool. Mr. Harvey, in a jesting 
mood, called Mr. Oelrichs a pet name, and then playfully 
plunged in the tide. Mr. Oelrichs, who is a magnificent 
swimmer, quickly followed, and ducked Mr. Harvey until 
he yelled for desistance. But later on, when Harvey got 
on the platform, and Oelrichs was further away, he again 
screamed the pet name. Oelrichs begged Harvey's com- 
panions on the raft to cast him in, but Downey is, though 
a small, a very strong man, and they could not budge him. 
Then Oelrichs struck out for the culprit himself, climbed 
upon the platform, and, seizing Downey in his arms, sprang 
with him into the pool. When the penitent young gentle- 
man was released, he had consumed more water in five 
minutes than he had taken in all the previous year, and he 
had sworn never to make merry again at Herman Oel- 
richs' expense. 

* * * 

A name for the fresh young Bohemians at the Jinks has 
been added to the vocabulary of the club, and seems to fit 
admirably. They were known as the "Brownies," and Joe 
Strong made a very good picture of them, dancing around 
Harry Dimond. The artists were out in force. Charles 
Rollo Peters painted, or manufactured a full moon which, 
shining upon the revels, almost compensated for the ab- 
sence of the genuine article. Strong made a portrait of 
the Sire, H. J. Stewart, in outing costume, with a back- 
ground of redwoods, and of Barbour Lathrop in the un- 
wonted character of a listener. Solly Wolters and Gordon 
Ross also did some good work in cartoons. 

# * # 

General Barnes, as Sisyphus, rolling the big stone to 
the top of the hill in Tartarus, to expiate his sins against 
the gods. As the wicked but sorely punished King of 
Corinth, the General delivered a lengthy poem on his mis- 
fortunes: 

" With many a weary step, and many a groan, 
Up the high hilt he heaves a huge round stone, 
The huge round stone, resulting with a hound. 
Thunders impetuous down and smokes along the ground." 
So wrote Homer, but the General's stone was made of 
pasteboard, though his simulation of intense fatigue was 
admirable. 

* * # 

A couple of local politicians found it necessary to the 
fruition of their plans to hold a conference with M. M. 
Estee, looking to a union of forces, or, more properly 
speaking, to an augmentation of their "pull." He was 
at Hedgeside, his country residence in Napa, so they went 
as far in that direction as steam would carry them, and 
then hired a carriage. They drove till they came to a 
gate with "Hedgeside" over it. but were then in doubt 
as to whether it was the residence of Mr. Estee. They 
pulled up their horses, and one of them shouted to an old 
rancher in overalls and a big straw hat, who was at work 
on the other side of the fei 

"My rural friend, do not deceive me, but tell me truly. 
Is this the genuine simon pure Hedgeside where lives the 
hedgehog ? " 

"This is Hedgeside," replied the farmer. 

"And is the hedgehog at home 1 " 

" Do you mean Mr. Estee ? " 

"Yes, my good friend." 

"I am Mr. Estee." 

The conference was indefinitely postponed. 



Genial Billy Stinson, the lightning paying teller of the 
Anglo-California Bank, is a young man of good habits, but 
he likes good living, and is a bit of an epicure. Some of 
his more intimate friends are aware that he is something 
of a connoisseur in the matter of wines, and he did not 
suppose that even a chance acquaintance suspected him 
of pronounced prohibition principles. 

Not long ago Billy was calling at the home of a young 
lady whom he knew but slightly, but whom, as her father's 
heiress, he desired to know better. He was entertained 
very nicely, and as he was thinking of making his adieux, 
his young hostess touched a bell, and a servant entered, 
bearing a tray. 

" You will have some ginger ale. Mr. Stinson ? " inquired 
the girl, sweetly. 

"No, I thank you." hastily declined Billy, whose special 
abhorrence is comprised in the term "soft drinks." 

"Just one glass," pleaded the youthful hostess. 

" Pardon me; I never touch it," replied Stinson, firmly. 

"Oh, but you know, ginger ale is not at all intoxicating. " 
urged the girl, smiling at innocent-looking Billy. 

Stinson's feelings were too deep for words. His de- 
parture was rather abrupt, and he kept wondering if 
there was anything in his appearance to suggest a farmer 
that the ginger ale explanation should have been consid- 
ered necessary. 

His chagrin was not decreased a day or two later when 
he learned, through a friend, that the girl had been string- 
ing him about the ginger ale, which had really been a very 
fine brand of champagne ! 



Assemblyman Howard E. Wright and Leslie Wright 
look so much alike that even their intimate friends have 
difficulty in distinguishing them. The matter of their re- 
semblance is a fad which they carefully cultivate, increas- 
ing their similarity by identity of garments. They are 
about the same height, and each wears eye-glasses and a 
Vandyke beard. 

Some persons who have met the Wrights doing the 
Kearny-street promenade together have rushed in terror 
to an oculist, while others have felt driven to strong drink. 

The other night Howard and Leslie made an appoint- 
ment to meet and dine at a certain French restaurant. 
Leslie arrived first, and the waiter, after spreading the 
cloth, ran to bring seltzer and olives, while Leslie studied 
the menu. Howard entered about that time, and the 
waiter, returning, was stricken with amazement at seeing 
his customer sitting in duplicate at opposite sides of the 
table. His mouth involuntarily opened, his fingers re- 
laxed, and he dropped bottle and dish. 

"MonDieu?" he said, wiping his forehead. " But eet 
must be ze mirror!" 

With his shattered nerves partially restored, he asked 
Leslie for the order, keeping bis eyes carefully averted 
from the side upon which Howard was sitting. When the 
Assemblyman made some suggestion about the dinner, and 
the waiter found that these guests were both living actu- 
alities, he fled incontinently. 

"Go away! Go away!" he screamed to the Messrs. 
Wright. " You come here no more ! You aire ze devil !" 



A little lady, who will soon be seven, and whose home is 
in a cottage on the hill at Sausalito, is intensely religious. 
Her mamma has been rather neglectful of the child's 
spiritual guidance lately, finding it a more congenial occu- 
pation to twang a guitar from her hammock on the wide 
piazza than to listen to her daughter's devotions. The kid 
finally protested, and the mother agreed to direct the 
little one's prayers. But the child declared she was tired 
of saying " the same old prayers," and pined for novelty. 

" Talk a little then,' suggested mamma. 

"Poor God!" began the little girl, pleased with the 
idea. ("Can you say j><>or God, mudder ?) I can't say any 
real prayers because my mudder hasn't time to teach me 
any!" 

Then she thanked the Creator for giving her the pretty 
house in which she lived, concluding with the following sug- 
gestion : 

"Really, God, you should make all the houses like this 
one, for some of the houses in Sausalito are simply awful!" 



July 31, 1897. 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LKTTIiR. 



'9 



If his hair were equal to his air, there would be nothing 
to mar the distinguished appearance of the Reverend Rob- 
ert Ritchie, the stalwart rector of the fashionable Episco- 
pal church of St. Paul's, Oakland. But unfortunately the 
sum total of his locks is comprised in the scanty fringe 
around his neck, so that, without his clerical hat, the up- 
per story of the eminent divine suggests the spot ball of a 
billiard table. A few days ago he met an acquaintance 
whom he had not seen for several years. Mr. Ritchie's 
recognition was immediate, but the other was not so quick. 

" You will know me when I take off my hat," predicted 
the Oakland clergyman, as he removed his headgear. And 
his prophecy was verified. 

Mr. Ritchie was rusticating in the country not long ago, 
and as he cherishes the delusion that his meagre capillary 
crop needs frequent trimming, he decided to invoke the 
services of the rustic barber. The task was speedily per- 
formed, and the parson handed the barber a quarter. The 
" tonsorial artist " returned a dime. 

"What's this for ?" demanded the rector. 

" You see, when a customer is as bald as you," explained 
the conscientious barber, "I don't think it would be right 
to charge more than fifteen cents ! " 
# * #■ 

Apropos of the annual midsummer jinks of the Bohemian 
Club, a group of members were recalling, the other day, 
an incident of a former jinks which, though famous within 
the club, had never leaked through its closed portals to 
the curious world outside. It had its origin in the ambi- 
tion of young Harry Wise to be a Bohemian — an ambition 
which failed to secure the endorsement of those already 
initiated in the mysteries of unconventionality. When 
Harry's application for membership came up for considera- 
tion, the Election Committee, with singular unanimity, 
said him nay. 

"This little mishap had no deterring effect on Harry's 
intention to attend the midsummer jinks, " said a veteran 
of the Post-street club, in relating the affair. 

" You don't mean to say that he went to the camp after 
being turned down by the committee ? " interposed an in- 
credulous listener. 

"That's what he did," was the reply. "And to show 
that he bore no malice to the club for his rejection, he not 
only went to the grave and watched the cremation of Care, 
but he took his father, the then Collector of the Port, along 
with him I " 



It seems that Will Powning is mourning the loss of a 
brand new silk hat. It was a daisy, the latest block, and 
it combined with his Willieboy most harmoniously. Willie 
went to the Bohemian Club jinks last Saturday night up 
in the Redwoods, and was so incautious as to wear this 
dream of a hat. Now he's sorry that he wore it. At the 
low jinks two rebellious gnomes deliberately stole his hat, 
and it was spitted on a spear and broiled to a crisp before 
the funeral pyle, while "Uncle" George was consigning 
Dull Care to Gehenna. 



NOTWITHSTANDING the many counter attractions of 
mountain and beach, Blythedale, with its lovely en- 
vironments, continues to attract and hold the city contin- 
gent. Many who became guests of the hotel when the sea- 
son opened are still there, and intend to remain until the 
house closes. The transient visitor is numerous and de- 
lighted. The accommodations are all that can be desired; 
the cottages are convenient, the hotel comfortable, and 
table excellent. Blythedale is but an hour out of the city, 
with many trains each way daily. 

Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 
cures Poison Oak and all skin diseases. The oldest and best remedy, 
which has cured thousands. At all druggists. 



Leona Heights, formerly Laundry Farm, is a most picturesque 
Sunday pleasure resort. Concerts are given at Leona Heights every 
Saturday and Sunday, and trains run at frequent intervals from 
Oakland to the grounds, which are well kept up, delightfully located 
and orderly. 

Great Reduction in prices during the summer months on Art Goods, 
Plotures, Crookery, Glassware, etc. S. & G. Gump, 113 Geary street. 



Jackson's Napa Soda lemonade is a luxury. Try it. 



M-T-TT I'M DM 

PACIFIC 
CONGRESS 
SPRINGS 
HOTEL 

Santa Cruz Mountains, 

Santa Clara County. 

Ommwtmm 




Remodeled and under 
New Management .... 

Onlu two-and-a-half hours 
from San Francisco. 



Six miles from Los Gatos. Ten 
miles from Santa Clara. Twelve 
miles from San Jose. 
For rates and printed matter address 



JOHN S, MATHESON, 

Manager, 



I 



VlGlio Springs. 



Three Miles from 
UKIAH. 



Terminus of S. F. &. N. P, Railway 

Mendocino County . , , 

The only place in the United States where Vichy Water is abundant. Only 
natural electric waters. Champagne baths. The only place in the world 
of this class of waters where the bathtubs are supplied by a continuous 
Bow of natural warm water direct from the springs. Accommodations 
first class. 

Miss D. D. fillen* Prop. 



Blytnedale- 



NOW OPEN. Hotel and Cottages 



A pretty California spotonlineofMt Tamalpais Scenic Railway. 
Carriage meets all trains at Mill Valley. Five minutes' drive. 



Mrs. Gregg. 



Under New 
Management 



^BWJE LAKES HOTEL, 



Only 19 miles from Ukiah. 

Finest summer resort in California. 

Good hunting, fishing, boating, and Bathing 

Finest cuisine and best accommodations. 



(Bertha Postofflce) 
LAKE COUNTY, CAL. 



R. E. WHITEFIELD, 

Manager. 



THE 



THE 



California Hotel : ! Hotel Rafael 



Absolutely Fireproof, 

San Francisco • . . Gal. 



Open all the year. Only 50 
j minutes from San Francisco. 

San Rafael . . . 



Two modern, exquisite, home-like first-class hotels, 
both under personal supervision of Gen. Warfleld. 

R. ft. WflRFlELD & GO., Proprietors. 



New York. 



Madison Square, Broadway and 23d 
Street. 



Under new management. Booms single or 
en suite. Restaurant unsurpassed. Ele- 
gant in all appointments at moderate 
prices. 

Reed & Roblee, Props. 
EUROPEAN PLAN. 



HOTEL 
BflRTflOLDI 

New York 



Hotel Bella Vista 



1001 Pine street 



ft First-class Hotel. 



The Bella Vista is the Pioneer 
First-class Family Hotel of 
San Francisco. All the com- 
forts of a modern residence. 

MRS. A. P. TRACY 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 31, 1897. 




.1/ fretco weddings are not of very frequent occurrence 
in this part of the world, but when they do take place, fine 
weather of course being a tine <jita mm, they are extremely 
pretty affairs. Such a wedding was one of the features of 
this w : eek at San Rafael, where, at the summer residence 
of Mr. and Mrs. Fleishhacker, their daughter Blanche was 
united to Frank Wolf of New York, the Reverend Jacob 
Voorsanger officiating. The nuptial knot was tied at noon 
on Tuesday last, in a rustic arbor of roses and honeysuckle, 
the guests in attendance witnessing the ceremony as they 
were grouped together on the lawn. The Misses Camille 
Rosenblatt, Ada Scheeline, Delia Seller, and Alice Taus- 
sig were the bride's attendants; Messrs. Julius Wolf, Ed- 
gar Rosenblatt, Fred Seller, and Herbert Fleishhacker 
performing the duties which fall to the share of the ushers. 
Music added its soft strains during the marriage service 
and also while the guests were at breakfast, a handsome 
• If 11 miir being served in-doors. Later in the day Mr. and 
Mrs. Wolf departed for the southern part of the State, 
where they will pass the honeymoon, and their future 
home will be the other side of the Continent. 

The month of August is likely to be quite a favorite one 
for weddings. It opens with one to-morrow, when Miss 
Rose Levingstone and A. Harris will be the bride and 
groom, the ceremony taking place at the home of the 
bride's parents, on Octavia street. Next on the list is the 
wedding of Miss Laura Leigh Gashwiler and S. M. Short- 
ridge, which is to be solemnized at the residence of Mrs. J. 
H. Gashwiler, on Central avenue, at noon on Monday. It 
will be a quiet ceremonial, relatives and intimate friends 
only being bidden to it. Besides these there are the Moffit- 
Folger and the Samuels-Foorman, which will be August 
weddings, in addition to others the dates of which are not 
definitely settled. 

The Pacific Yacht Club House at Sausalito was the 
locale selected by the Bachelors. Club for their dance on 
Tuesday evening, which was greatly enjoyed by those 
present. 

Among the dinners of the week was one given by Mrs. 
Pope, at Angel Island, on Tuesday evening, in honor of 
the new Commandante at that pretty post, Colonel Miller, 
TJ. S. A., and his family. Mrs. Pope is a charming host- 
ess, and will be much missed by the coterie at Angel Island 
when she and Dr. Pope take their departure next month 
for Columbus, Ohio, to which place Dr. Pope has recently 
received orders to proceed. 

Apropos of dinners, there was quite an interchange of 
these pleasant affairs during the visit of the British 
cruiser Comus to this harbor last week, and both afloat 
and ashore tbey were of daily occurrence while the ship 
was in port. 

The paper chase has now become a regular feature of 
the week at San Rafael, and each succeeding Saturday 
finds a larger gathering of participants, and an increased 
interest on the part of outsiders in the sport. General 
Warfield does not, however, rely upon any one thing as an 
attraction at the Hotel Rafael, but is untiring in his en- 
deavors to make his guests happy and comfortable, so that 
it is little wonder that his hostelrie has been the Mecca Of 
our social lights this summer. Last week's paper chase 
was a delightful one, and that to be ridden to-day prom- 
ises to eclipse all those gone before. 

The Downey Harveys, who have returned to town from 
their visit to Lake Tahoe, are among quite a number of 
others who are in the city again— willingly or the reverse 
— owing to the re-opening of the schools* which has com- 
pelled the return of the children, and hence, of course, of 
their parents, from summer quarters. So, from now on, 
we may expect to see the crowd daily increase, and a 
gradual resumption take place of social life in town, which 
during the past two months had been quite abandoned. 
Next week John Drew will be here, which means a fashion- 



able house at the Baldwin on Monday night to greet him 
and Rosemary, and theatre parties ad lib. during his en- 
gagement. Drew is a favorite both professionally and 
socially, and always comes in for a lot of entertainments, 
as many, in fact, as he has time and the desire to accept, 
and at Burlingame is a most welcome guest. 

Major and Mrs. Groesbeck have returned from their 
Eastern visit of two months and are domiciled at the 
Pleasanton. Mr. and Mrs. Sam Knight are also at home 
again from their visit East. Mrs. Margaret Deane was 
welcomed home from her long absence abroad by a recep- 
tion at Golden Gate Hall given by the members of the 
Catholic Ladies' Aid Society; the Rounseville Wildmans 
also, who recently returned from their visit to Washington 
City, have been the recipients of many hospitalities prior 
to their departure again, — this time for Hong Kong, 
which is to be Mr. Wildman's new post of duty. They are 
the guests of Mrs. Aldrich on Pine street. 

Mrs. Julius Reis and Miss Lillie are among the guests at 
Paraiso Springs. The Harry Babcocks are occupying 
their villa at Lake Tahoe; the Misses Sherwood are at 
Pacific Grove; Mrs. I. L. Poole has been spending the 
summer in Lake County. Miss Mollie Phelan has arrived 
in Germany, where she will make a stay of some duration. 

Captain W. L. Merry has gone East on business in con- 
nection with bis recent appointment of Consul to some of the 
Central American States. In the event of the family ac- 
companying him to Central America they will be very 
much missed at Sausalito, where they are very popular. 

To-day, July Hist, at San Rafael, the fifth paper chase 
will be run, the hares being Mr. Hugh Hume and Miss 
Bertha Smith, who won the last paper chase. Next Sat- 
urday, August 7th, the event of the season will take place, 
the occasion being the contest for the Ingleside Cups, 
which have been presented by the Ingleside Race Track. 
This paper chase will bring a large number of strangers to 
San Rafael, both from Oakland and Burlingame. The 
Oakland contingent won the paper chase three Saturdays 
ago, and have great hopes of coming in victors this time. 
Messrs. Hobart, Tobin, and others are expected from 
Burlingame, and a large field of forty or fifty contestants 
is looked for. More than two dozen young ladies have en- 
tered for these stakes. Visitors desiring to see the finish 
can leave San Francisco, via Tiburon, at 1:50 p. It., or on 
the 1:45 Narrow Gauge, and take a carriage to the finish 
field and return, arriving in San Francisco at six o'clock. 
As the finishes are very exciting, and the race of August 
7th bids fair to be an exceedingly interesting one, a large 
number of spectators will be present. In the evening a 
hop will take place at the Hotel Rafael. 

D. F. Verdenal, for a long time a well-known journalist 
of this city, but for several years and at present the enter- 
taining New York correspondent of the Chronicle, is in 
the city. 

Miss Mauson's boarding and day school for girls begins 
Monday, August 2d, at 1925 San Jose avenue, between 
Grand and Paru streets, Alameda. 

To get up a banquet, supper, or marriage dinner— perfect in its ap- 
pointments and satisfying the tastes of the most refined is an art; 
but Max Abraham at 42s '.eary street is a master of that art, as his 
superintendence of all the swell dinners in the city very clearly 
proves. Practice has made him perfect. 

GREAT Reduction Id prices during the summer months on Art Goods, 
Pictures. Crockery, Glassware, eto S. & G. Gump. 113 Geary street. 



$1000op 

Schilling's Best gold is as good as Alaska gold. 
Guess the missing word and get your share of it. 
Shillings Best tea is at your grocer's. 



July 






SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



ABOUT A RING. 



" f"f rL 



" Hullo, Jack!" 

This is our usual salutation, or, to be accurate, the first 
part of it. The remainder is not verbal. 

"You are three minutes and a half late," said she. 

" I've been busy — thinking." 

" AU that time! About me, of course." 
<>h, dear, no! About an abstract proposition." 
What proposition ? " 

" A question, rather. Why do ladies wear engagement 
rings '.' " 

"Some don't." 

" Those who are engaged do, clever miss." 

" I don't." We had only been engaged a week, you see. 

" But you are going to ? " 

'Yes. if you please, kind sir; if it's a nice one." 

"Well, then, why should a lady wear an engagement 
ring ?" 

" To show that she's engaged, of course. What did you 
imagine ? " 

" Because she likes jewelry." 

" Oh, dear, no! I don't care much for jewelry." 

"Then you don't care whether the ring is pretty or 
not?" 

" N— o. I don't care. But engagement rings always 
are pretty, you know, Jack." SLe announced tbis as if 
she didn't wish me to make any mistake upon the point. 

"Why, I understood that the fashion was to have them 
quite plain now," I observed, solemnly. 

"But that's nonsense. You must be mistaken." I 
could detect a trace of anxiety. 

" I read it in some paper." 

"The Football Star or the Referee?" she asked blandly. 
Of course I read other papers, too. 

" Oh, no! In some fashion column, I think.'' 

" But it isn't true, really, Jack?" I chuckled inwardly. 
It is so rarely that I can get a rise out of Cis. 

"Just a plain band with 'Engaged' on it," I continued 
placidly; "something like a dog's collar with the name on 
it." 

" I call it ridiculous," remarked she, warmly. 

"But, my dear girl " 

" I won't be your dear girl, if you're going to treat me 
like a dog." 

" Oh, of course, if you don't like it " 

" It isn't usual, Jack?" she said, pitifully. 

"But if the only object is to show that you're en- 
gaged " 

" People couldn't read the letters." 

" They're very large and distinct," I explained, cheer- 
fully. 

" Horribly conspicuous!" 

' ' NaturaCy — to achieve their object. You say the ring 
is merely to show that the lady is engaged." 

" Ye — es. But engagement rings always have stones 
in them." She shook her head and spoke quite solemnly. 
She always gets the best of me that way. 

" You would rather have stones in it, then?" I asked, as 
if the fact surprised me. 

"Well, I should like whatever you gave me — but — 
but " 

" You don't want the ring merely to show that you're 
engaged." 

"Well, you see — mamma is a bit old-fashioned, Jack — 
dear, I think she would expect — of course, it isn't any one 
else's business — but if you think of getting me one — there 
isn't any need, unless you like — but '' 

"Suppose I've bought one already ? " 

"Oh, Jackl" She looked at me in absolute dismay. 
" One of those new ones ? " 

" Well, I don't know " I began slowly, thinking she 

would interrupt, but she didn't. "If you don't like it, I 
must change it." 

" I shall like whatever you give me, Jack, for what it 
means," she said quietly. Upon my word, she is a little 
brick; the tears came right into her eyes, but she made a 
desperate effort to smile. 

"No, no, Cis, it isn't the newsort," I said hastily. You 



wouldn't have teased her any more if you'd been in my 
place. " Look here I " 

"Oh, Jack! oh, how lovely! Diamonds and emeralds! 1 
do love them so! I oughtn't to care about the look, ought 
I? But " 

" I'm glad you do." 

" You shouldn't have been so extravagant. But — I am 
so pleased, Jack." 

I held it out to her in its velvet case. 

'• No. You must put it on." 

I took it out gingerly, between my finger and thumb. 

" Is it usual for the giver to do anything to the ring?" I 
asked. 

"No. I don't think so. But he might — perhaps — kiss 
the lady. 

And Cis kissed the ring. — St. Paul's. 




S czocfont 



offers three virtues linked in one: 



FRAGRANT, 
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PRESERVING 

Properties. 

Liquid and powder in the same package. 

HALL & RUCKEL 

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A sample of Sozodont and Sozoderma 

Soap for the postage, 3 cents. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS- 

Estate of JAMES S. BENNET, Deceased. 
Notice Is hereby given by the undersigned, A. O. Freese, Administrator 
of the estate of James S. Bennet, deceased, to the creditors of, and all per- 
sons having claims against the said deceased, to exhibit them, with the 
necessary vouchers, within four months after the first publication of this 
notice, to the said Administrator, at room S3, Chronicle building, corner 
Geary and Kearny streets, San Franoisco, Cal., the same being his place 
for the transaction of the business of the said estate in the City and 
County of San Francisco, State of California. 

A. C. FREESE, Administrator of the Estate of James S. Bennet, Deceased. 
J. D. Sullivan. Attorney for the Administrator. 
Dated at San Francisco, July 2, 1897. 



Occidental Hotel. 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 

attention. 



Wm. B. ttooper, Manager. 



San Francisco 



fc R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
* CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, Moth 
Patches, Rash, and Skin Diseases, and 
every blemish on beauty, and defies de- 
tection . It has s tood the test of 48 years 
and is so harmless w e taste it to be sure 
It is properlv made Accept no counter- 
feit of simi'v-r name. Dr. L. A. Sayre 
said to a lady of the haut-ton (a pa- 
tient) : *'As you ladies will use them, I 
recommend 'Gouraud's Cream ' as the 
least harmful of all the Skin prepara- 
tions," For sale by all Druggists and 
Fancy-Goods Dealers in the United 
States, Canadas, and Europe 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r, 

37 Great Jones St., N. Y. 




22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 31, 1897. 



NOTES OF THE ARMY AND NAVY. 

The engagement is announced of Miss Alice Maude Dun- 
bar, daughter of Chaplain and Mrs. G. W. Dunbar, U. S. 
A., of Alcatraz Island, to Lieutenant William P. Pence, 
Fifth Artillery, U. S. A. 

There was a brilliant full Cress military wedding at Fort 
Monroe, Va., on July 14th, when Miss Fannie Davis, the 
accomplished daughter of Captain and Mrs. J. M. K. Davis, 
U. S. A.., was married to Lieutenant Andrew Hero Jr., 
Fourth Artillery, U. S. A. Captain Davis and his family 
are well known here as he was stationed at the Presidio 
some years ago. The newly married couple have gone to 
Europe on a three months' trip and have taken their 
wheels with them. 

Miss Irmingarde Anderson, who has been attending 
school at Farmington, Conn., during the past year, is now 
at Vancouver Barracks, Wash., on a visit to her father, 
Colonel J. M. Anderson, Fourteenth Infantry, U. S. A. 

Dr. and Mrs. Ogden Rafferty, U. S. A., and their child- 
ren, are here on a three months' visit renewing former ac- 
quaintances. At the conclusion of their visit they will go 
to their new station, Willets Point, N. Y. 

Lieutenant and Mrs. A. F. Fechteler, U. S. N., recently 
became the parents of a baby boy at their home in San 
Rafael. Mrs. Fechteler is the daughter of Justice W. W. 
Morrow. 

The gunboat Yorktown is expected to arrive here from 
the China Station about August 10th. She will then be 
placed out of commission, thoroughly repaired and 
modernized. 

The monitor Comanche is to be docked at the Mare Is- 
land navy yard and overhauled. She will not return to her 
anchorage here for several months. 

The old wooden cruiser Mohican is at the Mare Island 
navy yard being prepared for service. 

The Marietta is at the Mare Island having the finishing 
touches put on preparatory to being commissioned. 

The Monadnock returned from Puget Sound last Satur- 
day. 

The training ship Adams, now at Mare Island, will soon 
take on another crew of apprentice boys and proceed to 
sea for more practice cruising. 

Rear Admiral J. N. Miller, U. S. N., accompanied by 
his aides, Lieutenant Philip Andrews, U. S. N., and 
Lieutenant Rogers, U. S. N. will sail from here for 
Honolulu next Thursday. 

Rear Admiral John G. Walker, U. S. N., and Captain 
Oberlin M. Carter, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., have 
been appointed members of the Nicaragua Canal Com- 
mission. 

Quartermaster General G. H. Weeks, U. S. A., has re- 
turned to his headquarters at Washington, D. C, after a 
comprehensive tour of the West. It is said that there 
will be several changes of stations in officers of the Quarter- 
master's Department. There is a most desirable vacancy 
at Fort Monroe. 

Major-General Z. R. Bliss, U. S. A., retired, and bis 
family are at Conanicut, Newport, R. I. 

Colonel Samuel B. M. Young, U. S. A., has been trans- 
ferred from the Fourth to the Third Cavalry. 

Lieutenant Colonel Michael Cooney, U. S. A., has been 
transferred from the Fourth to the Seventh Cavalry. 

Lieutenant Colonel James Jackson, U. S. A., has been 
transferred from the Second to the Fourth Cavalry. 

Commander Charles O'Neil. U. S. N., has been promoted 
to the rank of Captain. 

Captain Norman H. Farquhar, U. S. N, has been pro- 
moted to the rank of Commodore. 

Captain Uriel Sebree, U. S. N., has been ordered to 
command the Wheeling, and Lieutenant F. H. Lefavor, U. 
S. N., has been appointed Executive Officer. The Wheel- 
ing will be put in commission about August 15th and will 
be sent to Alaska to relieve the Concord as station-ship; 
the latter will then join the Asiatic Squadron. 

Lieutenant Commander Walton Goodwin. U. S. N., has 
been promoted to the rank of Commander. 

The gunboat Bennington sailed last Wednesday for San 
Diego to give the Naval Battalion there a d'ill and a 
cruise for a week. It is surmised that she will then go to 
Honolulu. 



Engineer-in-Chief John Wilkie Collins, U. S. R. C. S., 
has been appointed Captain of Engineers in that service. 

Major Thomas M. K. Smith. First Infantry, U. S. A., 
has been detached from San Diego Barracks and ordered 
to assume command of Benicia Barracks. 

Captain Luigi Lomia, Fifth Artillery, U.S. A., has been 
granted two months' leave of absence, to take effect about 
August 5th. 

Captain Charles M. Gandy. Assistant Surgeon. U. S. A., 
has been assigned to duty at Fort Mason. 

Captain W. A. Thompson, U. S. A., has been trans- 
ferred from the Fourth to the Second Cavalry. 

Captain J. A. Augur, U. S. A., bas been transferred 
from the Fifth to the Fourth Cavalry. 

Lieutenant Wainwright Kellogg. U. S. N.. has been 
promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Commander. 

Lieutenant U. R. Harris. U. S. N.. has been detached 
from the Adams, ordered to examination for promotion at 
Mare Island, then ordered home and granted two months' 
leave of absence. 

Lieutenant J. M. Roper, U. S. N., will be detached from 
the Monadnock on August 14th, ordered home, and granted 
two months' leave of absence. 

Lieutenant F. A. Wilner, U. S. N., will be detached 
from the Adams on August 14th. and ordered to the Mo- 
nadnock. 

Lieutenant F. E. Beatty. U. S. N.. will be detached 
from the Naval Academy on August 7th and proceed at 
once to the Adams. 

Lieutenant John P. Hains, First Artillery. U. S. A., 
who was recently promoted, has been ordered to remain 
on duty with the Third Artillery until September 1st. and 
then join his battery at Fort Barrancas. Fla. 

Lieutenant Dennis E. Nolan, First Infantry. U. S. A., 
has been relieved from duty at the Presidio and ordered 
to San Diego Barracks. 

Lieutenant Charles B. Vogdes. First Infantry. U.S. A., 
is now on duty at Benicia Barracks. 

Lieutenant W. B. Homer. Fifth Artillery, U. S. A., has 
been granted four weeks' leave of absence. 

Lieutenant John K. Cree. Third Artillery. U. S. A., has 
been granted one month's leave of absence, to take effect 
August 1st. 

Sergeant Thomas M. Anderson Jr., Fourth Cavalry. U. 
S. A., has been promoted to the rank of Second Lieu- 
tenant. 

Sixty-seven of the new cadets from the Military Academy 
have been appointed, with the rank of Additional Second 
Lieutenants, and will report at their stations by Septem- 
ber 30th. The appointments for this Coast are as follows: 
Robert S. Abernethy and Edward O. Sarratt, Third Artil- 
lery; Mervyn C. Buckley, Fifth Artillery; Matthew E. 
Hanna and Pierce A. Murphy, Fourth Cavalry; Frederick 
E. Johnston, First Infantry. 

The United States Attorney General has rendered a de- 
cision to the effect that no officer at present on the army 
roll can wear the uniform of the volunteer rank, but per- 
sons who were honorably mustered out of the volunteer 
service and have no army connection now may wear it 
on occasions of ceremony. This is a matter of interest to 
thousands of volunteer officers. 

The new gun boat Helena was presented with an elab- 
orate set of silver service last Sunday evening at Wash- 
ington. D. C. It was a gift from the citizens of Helena, 
Montana. 

Major David H. Kinzie. Third Artillery. U. S. A., has 
returned from Fort Canby. Wash., and is in command at 
Alcatraz Island. 

Lieutenant Elmer W. Hubbard, Third Artillery. U. S. 
A., has been granted twenty days' leave of absence, com- 
mencing August 1st. 

Lieutenant F. E. Lacy Jr.. of Benicia Barracks, is ab- 
sent from duty on a three weeks' leave. 

Lieutenant Samuel McP. Rutherford, Fourth Cavalry, 
U. S. A., bas been granted one month's leave of absence 
commencing August 1st. He will report for instruction at 
the Infantry and Cavalry School on September 1st. 

The Bennington will leave on August 5th for Honolulu, 
en route to Pearl Harbor to conduct a survey. 

The training ship Comanche is being overhauled and re- 
painted on the dry dock at Mare Island. 



July 31. 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



By l^ail, Boat ar?d Sta^e. 



Southern Pacific Co. --Pacific System. 



Trains Leave and are Due to Arrive ai SAN 


FRANCISCO: 


Umt. | From July I, 1»7. 


I .<4rriw 



•8:00a Nlles. Sao Jose, and way stations 

7:00a Atlantic Express, OgdenandEast 

7:00 a Bcnteia, Sacramento, OrovUlc, and Redding, via Davis 

7:00 a VacavlUe and Rumsey 

7:30 a Martinez. San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Cahstoga, Santa Rosa 
8:30a Nlles, San Jose, Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Marysville, 

Cbtco, Tehama, and Red Bluff 

•8:30 A Peters, Milton, and Oakdale 

0:00a New Orleans Express, Merced. Fresno, Bakersfleld, Santa 
Barbara, Los Angeles, Deming, El Paso, New Orleans, and 
East 



8:46 P 
5:46 p 
8:45 P 
6:15 P 

4:15p 
*7:15P 



6:15 P 

9: 00 a Vallejo 13:16 P 

Nlles, Sao Jose Livermore, and Stockton 7:15p 

•1 :00p Sacramento River steamers *9 :0U p 

1 :00 p Nlles.San Jose, and Livermore 8:45a 

1:30 p Martinez and Way Stations 7:45 p 

4:00p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Callstoga, El Verano 

and Santa Rosa 9:15A 

4:00 p Benicia, Winters. Woodland, Knight's Landing, Marys- 

ville, Oroville, and Sacramento 10:15A 

4:30 p Lathrop. Stockton, Modesto, Merced, Raymond (for Yost-m- 
ite) and Fresno, going via Niles, returning via Martinez.. 12:15 P 
5:00 p Los Angeles Express, Tracy, Fresno, Mojave (for Rands- 
burg), Santa Barbara, and Los Angeles 7.45a 

5:00p Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, for Mojave and East.... 6:16p 

6 :00 p European mail, Ogden and East 10:15 a 

6:00 p Haywards, Niles and San Jose 7:45a 

18:00 p Vallejo f7:45p 

8:00 p Oregon Express, Sacramento, Marysvllle, Redding, Port- 
land, Paget Sound and East 7:45a 

San Leandro and Haywards Local. (Foot of Market St.) 



i«o00 Al 


Melrose, 


f 7:15 A 


8:00 a 


Seminary Park, 


19:45 A 


0:00 a 


Fitchburg, 


10:45 A 


10:00 a 


Elmhurst. 


11:45 A 


ill .00 A 


San Leandro. 


12:45 P 


(12:00 K 


South San Leandro, 


(1:45 P 


2:00 P 


Estudillo, 


J8:45 P 


i3:00 p 


Lorenzo, 


4:45 P 


4:00 p 


Cherry, 


(5:45 P 


5:00 p 


and 


6:15 p 


5:30 p 


Haywards. 


7:45 P 


7:00 P 




8:45 P 


8:00 P 


i Runs through to Nlles. 


9:45 P 


9:00 P 


t From Niles. 


10:50 P 


ttll:16 P 




lttl2:00 P 



Santa Cruz Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

17:45 A Santa Cruz Excursion, Santa Cruz & principal way stations 18:05 p 

8:15 A Newark, Centerville, San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 5:50P 

•8:15 P Newark, Centerville, San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations *10:5oa 

4:15 p San Jose and Qlenwood 9:2.1> 

14:15 p Felton and Santa Cruz §9 ;20 A 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— *7:15, 9:00, and 
11:00 A. M., Jl :0O, «2:00, 13:00. «4:00, 15:00 and *6:00P. M. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— *6:00, 8:00, 10:00 A. M.; {12:00, •1:00, 
t2 :00, «3 :00, 14 :00 *5 :00 P. M. 

Coast Division (Third and Townsend streets). 



•7:00a 
17:30 a 



10:40a 
11:80 a 
•2:80 P 



•8:80 P 
•4:80P 
5:80 P 
8:80P 
tll:45p 



San JoseandwaystatlonslNew Almaden Wednesdays only) 1: 
Sunday excursion for San Jose, Santa Cruz, Paciflo Grove, 

and principal way stations 18: 

San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Paso Robles 
San LuisOblspo, Guadalupe, Sarf andprinclpalwaystatlons 4 

SanJose and way stations 9: 

Palo Alto and way stations 5 

San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Santa Clara, San Jose, 
Gllroy, Eollister, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, Paciflo 

Grove. *10: 

San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove and way stations *7 

San Jose and Way Stations *8: 

San Jose and principal way stations *8 

SanJose and way stations 6 

San Jose and way stations 17 



15 p 
45 a 
25 P 



30 A 

:3UP 

:05A 
:45 a 
35 A 



A for Morning, p for Afternoon. 'Sundays excepted. fSaturdays only. 

ISundays only . tt Monday, Thursday, and Saturday nights only. 

^Saturdays and Sundays. gSundays and Mondays. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
Enquire of Tloket Agents for Time Cards and 



hotels and residences 
other information. 



The f.panrf Porifir 808 Stockton St. San Francisco. 
1116 UldllU rdulllUi MRS. ELLA CORBETT, Proprietress. 
Furnished rooms by the day, week, or month Telephone : Grant, 507. 



San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tl BORON FIRRY- Foot of Market Strcot. 
WEEK DAYS— 7:80,9:00. 11:00 am; 12:35, 3:80 5:10, S:90 p M. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11:30 p m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :B0 and 11:30 P M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00,9:30, 11:00 A H: 1:30. 3:30, 6:00, 6:20P M. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 8:10, 7:50,9:20, 11:10 am; 12:45, 8:40,6:10pm. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1:55 and 6:35 PM. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:10, 11:10 am; 1:40, 8:40, 6:00, 6:25 p m. 

Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same sohedule as above. 



Leave S. F. 


In Effect Juno 13, 1897 


Arrive in S. F. 


Week Days. 


Sundays. 


DESTINATION. 


Sundays | Week Days 


7:30am 
3:30 pm 
6:10 pm 


8:00am 
9:30 am 
5:00 pm 


Novato, 
Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa. 


10:40 am 1 8:40 am 
6:10pm 10:26 am 
7:35 pm ] 6:22 PM 






Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

Geyservllle. Cloverdale 








8:00 am 


7:36 PM 




3:30 pm 


6:22 p m 


3:30 PM | S:K> AM 


Hopland, Uklah 


7«pm 1 l":i» AM 
7.35PM | g.jjj p „ 


7:30AM 1 8:00am 

3:30PM 


Guernevllle. 


7-9SPM 1 10:25 A M 
7.35PM | 6:22PM 


7:30 am I 8:00AM 
5:10pm 1 5:00pm 


Sonoma, 
Glen Ellen. 


10:40AM 1 8:40 A M 
6:10pm 1 6:22 pm 


7:30am I 8:00am 
3:30pm 1 5:00pm 


Sehastopol. | «$*$- | 10:25 A « 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs; at Geyservllle 
for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for High- 
land Springs, Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport, and Bartlett Springs; at 
Uklah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Laurel Del 
Lake, Upper Lake, Porno, Potter Valley, John Day's, Riverside, Lier- 
ley's, Bucknell's Sashedoin Heights, Hullvllle, Booneville, Orr's Hot 
Springs , Mendocino City, Ft. Bragg. Westport, Usal. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 

TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 
A. W. FOSTER, Fr es. & Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass . Agent . 

Pacific Coast Steamsh i p Co - 

Steamers leave Broadway Wharf, San Francisco for ports in Alaska, 
9 A. M-. August 4. 9, 14, 19,24, 29, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For British Columbia and Puget Sound ports, 9 a. m., August 4, 9, 
14, 19, 24, 29, and every 5th day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), Steamer "Pomona," at 2 P. M. Aug. 3, 7, 
11, 16, 20, 24, 28; Sept. 1, 6, 10, 14, 18. 22, 27; October 1, 5, 9. 13. II, S3, 26, 30. 

For Newport, Los Angeles and all way ports, at 9 A. M. ; Aug. 2, 6, 10, 14, 
18. 22, 26, 30, and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford Santa Barbara, Port Los 
Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles) and Newport, 11 A. M., Aug. 4, 8, 12. 16, 
20,24, 28, and every fourth day thereafter. 

For Ensenada, Magdalena Bay, San Jose delCabo, Mazatlan, Altata. La 
Paz. Santa Rosalia, and Guaymas (Mexico), steamer "Orizaba," 10 A. m., 
the 2d of each month. 

The company reserves the right to change, without previous notice, 
steamers, sailing dates, and hours of sailing. 

Ticket Office— Palaoe Hotel, No. 4 New Montgomery street. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 10 Market st.S. F. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p m., for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, 

calling at rwbe (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at 

Hongkong with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on 

day of sailing. 

Belgic Saturday, August 14, 1897 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday, September 2, 1897 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, September 21, 1897 

Doric Tuesday, October 12, 1897 

Round Trip tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street, 
corner First. D. D. STUBBS, Secretary. 



[ANN 




@a$wur 



S S "Australia", for Honolulu only, Tuesday, 
August 10th, at 2 p m. 

S. S. "Alameda," Thursday, Aug. 19th. at 2 P M. 
Line to Coolgardle, Australia, and Capetown, 
South Afrioa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO., 
Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight office, 327 
Market St., San Francisco. 



Lieutenant Commander J. K. Cogswell, U. S. N., of the 
Marion, arrived here last Saturday from Honolulu, en 
route home. 

Captain ClermoDt L. Best, First Artillery, U. S. A., is 
now in command of Battery G., at Jackson Barracks, New 
Orleans. 

General Stewart L. Woodford, United States Minister 
to Spain, sailed from New York for Madrid last Wednes- 
day, accompanied by Captain Tasker Bliss, TJ. S. military 
attache, and Lieutenant George S. Dyer, U. S. navy at- 
tache. 



WITHIN three miles of Ukiah, the terminus of the San 
Francisco and North Pacific Coast Railway, is situ- 
ated Vichy Springs, noted for its champagne baths and 
abundant flow of health-giving Vichy water. The hotel, 
under the management of Miss D. D. Allen, is fitted 
throughout with every modern convenience. The cuisine 
is especially fine, and the wants of guests are promptly 
anticipated. It is one of the most popular summer resorts 
in the State. 

All sensible people drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



24 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 31, 1897. 



TWO AFRICAN MONARCHS. 

MPAUL MIMANDE has recently paid a visit to two 
, dusky potentates, ruling, under French control, in 
West Africa, and gives a description of his experiences 
{IS Illustration), which is nothing if not entertaining. Aqo- 
li-Aqbo, the King of Dahomey, according to the writer, is 
a decidedly antipathetic personage. His majesty is a 
large stout negro, with a broad flat nose, and a sly, 
treacherous expression. On ceremonial occasion he wears 
a sort of toga of white cloth, and a pasteboard helmet 
covered with some spangled material. This costume, 
although sufficiently absurd, has the advantage of being sim- 
ple and inexpensive. Aqo-li-Aqbo is vain, and fond of dis- 
play; but unhappily the royal purse is depleted, and he 
cannot gratify his luxurious tastes. Too poor to maintain 
the royal stables he has been obliged to abandon driving 
about in the berlin which his predecessor enjoyed, and in 
his mortification bit upon a happy expedient which is 
characteristic. He caused a small vehicle to be built, 
something like the wagons in which peddlers hawk their 
goods at country fairs, and in the deficiency of horses, 
conferred upon his ministers the honor of dragging it. The 
ministers play their part to perfection; they trot along 
rapidly at an eves pace, and, the drive over, resume their 
post as the confidential friends and advisers of their 
sovereign. Aqo-li-Aqbo has had the honor, M. Paul 
Mimande declares, of realizing practically, for the first 
time, the conception of the chariot of state, which has 
hitherto been regarded as merely an abstraction. 

The King of Dahomey has three hundred wives, and lives 
in the old palace of Sambodji, which formerly witnessed so 
many human sacrifices, the very walls, only a short time 
ago, being garnished with skulls. He has no longer any 
power either to behead or crucify, and contents himself 
with smoking, drinking, and courtship. 

Toffa, the King of Porto Nova, is a much more wealthy 
and powerful monarch. Indeed, since Solomon, it is ques- 
tionable whether he has had his peer. Toffa has a full 
treasury, five hundred wives, and concubines ad libitum, 
who never address him save on their knees, subjects who 
prostrate themselves at his approach, and children more 
numerous than those of Prism. He is a man of about fifty, 
black as the ace of spades, with small, but keen and pierc- 
ing eyes, and is very subtle and intelligent. When he ap- 
pears in his royal costume, a splendid robe embroidered 
with gold, a helmet with a tufted plume, his arms loaded 
with bracelets, and his breast starred with amulets, he 
produces an extraordinary and very contradictory impres- 
sion; that of grolesqueness combined with real dignity. 

Toffa's palace is a handsome wooden structure, not un- 
like the country-seat of a well-to-do middle-class English- 
man. A long avenue of trees leads up to it, and the en- 
closure of which it stands is surrounded by a wall, with an 
immense entrance gate which, for the most part, is 
hospitably open. It is evident that the king is beloved by 
his subjects, and in no fear of anarchists and dynamiters. 
His manner of receiving his European visitors is novel. 
Toffa sits upon his throne in the reception-hall, surrounded 
by his counsellors and the members of his household. The 
foreigners are introduced. A bottle of champagne is 
brought; and the three principal officials of the kingdom 
come forward to open it: one takes the bottle, the second 
the corkscrew, and the third the glasses. Their faces are 
grave— they feel the responsibility of their important 
office. When the glasses are filled the king rises. This 
is the supreme moment! The courtiers prostrate them- 
selves face downward: his majesty clicks his glass with 
those of his guests, and they drink 'in silence. The cere- 
mony over, Toffa resumes his seat, and strikes the floor 
with his cane, the signal for the courtiers to rise. On 
hearing it, they start up snapping their fingers like 
castanets. 



am men ought to stand by ihe miners." "For what 
reason?" "Look at the coal we husbands have handled 
for no wages at all."— Chicago Record. 

Only fashionable gentlemen's wear is to he found at John W. 
Carmany's, 2. r . Kear ny st reet. Newest, latest. [Strictly up-to-date. 

Mothbrs. besureanduso -Mrs. Wmslow's Soothing Syrup" for your 

children while teething. 



CHIROGRAPHY OF THE PRESIDENTS. 

THE chirography of the Presidents from Washington 
down to McKinley is as different as the chirography of 
the same number of any other men chosen at random from 
the various walks of life. Students of character contend 
that there are many points of similarity in the mental 
make-up and equipment of our Presidents, but if there are, 
they are certainly not shown in the handwriting of these 
men. Of the entire lot, I suppose old Zachary Taylor 
wrote the worst hand. I have seen numerous letters of 
his which I am confident no human being could read. It 
was cramped and awkward, like that of a boy just learning 
to write. Jefferson wrote a plain, flowing hand, and 
Monroe's writing was decidedly feminine, though not 
nearly so much so as Grover Cleveland's, whose chiro- 
graphy is small and delicate. Jackson's scrawl bespoke a 
nervousness and timidity of which nobody dared to accuse 
him while he was on the earth, and Lincoln's a smooth 
polish, which his crude simple mind did not bespeak. Of 
all our chief magistrates McKinley writes the best hand, 
and his chirography shows a painstaking ease and caution 
which are evidently the dominant factors of the man's 
character. — St. Louis Republic. 

Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. Cooper & Co., 740 
Market street. San Francisco. 



Jackson's Napa Soda is a gentle aperient. 



Bbomo Kola cures headaches, neuralgia, and nervous troubles. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, Cal. Location 
of works—Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the twenty- seventh day of July, 1897, an assessment. No. 71, of Ten 
(10) cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, room 35. third tioor of Mills Building, N. E. corner 
Bush and Montgomery streets, San Francisco, Cal 

Any stock upon whioh this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
31st DAY OF AUGUST, 1887, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction; and, unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 21st day of Sept., 
1807, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale . By order of the Board of Directors . 

JAMES NEWLANDS. Secretary. 

Office-Room 35, third floor Mills Building. N. E. corner Bush and Mont- 
gomery street. San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Mexican Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works — Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 28 day of July, 1897, an assessment (No. 57) of Twenty (20c) Cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
Immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the office of the 
company, room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
1st DAY OF SEPTEMBER. 1897, 
wlU be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before will be sold on Thursday, the 23d day of Sept., 
1897, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E ELLIOT. Secretary. 

Office: Room 79, Nevada Block, 339 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Hale & Norcross 8ilver Mining Company. 
Office oftbe Hale& Ngk. Ross Slivkk Minim: Company, Room 11, 
3BI Pine street. San Francisco, July 27. 1897 

Notice Is hereby given that at a m^etin? of the Board of Directors of this 
company, held this day, the date of delinquency of stock for assessment 
No. Ill was postponed until 

SEPTEMBER 2K, 1897. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on Sept. 28. 
1897, will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction: and un- 
less payment be made before, will be sold on MONDAY, October 18. 1897 
to pay said delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertising 
and expenses of the sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

R. R. GRAYSON, Secretary 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Alpha Con. Mill and Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 19 

Amount per Share 10 centp 

Levied July 8,1897 

Delinquent in Office August 12, 1897 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock September 2, 1897 

CHARLES E. ELLIOT. Secretary. 
Office: Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

Weak Hen and Women S,„rg re D a1 l M I e A x?c'.nrl I m: 

edy ; It gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Mar- 
ket street. San Francisco. (Send for circular.) 



PANORAMIC SERIES, PLATE 72. 



WITH S. F. NEWS LETTER, AUGUST 7, 1897, 




Across the Golden Gate, San Francisco Looking Over the Fort. 








Seal Rock, San Francisco, After a Storm. 



PICTURESQUE CALIFORNIA. 



Price per Copy. 10 Cents. 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 




«*•* ■3S8? ,% «o 








Vol.LV. 



SAN FRANCISCO. AUGUST 7. 1897. 



Number 6. 



Printed and Published every Saturday by the proprietor, FRED MARRJ0T7 
&% Kearny ttreet, San Francisco. Entered at San Francisco Post- 
office a* Second-date Matter. 

The office of the NEWS LETTER in New Tort City is at Temple Court; 
and at Chicago, 905 Boyce Building, (Frank E. Morrison, Eastern 
Representative), where information maybe obtained regarding subscrip 
tion and advertising rates. 



THE Supervisors have adjourned until the 13th of Sep- 
tember, and tax-payers can nerve themselves mean- 
time to sustain the shock of the new tax levy that is due to 
arrive on the 20th of that month. 



THE first cheering report heard from the Whittier 
State School is that one declaring a reduction of sala- 
ries. Next to the discharge of the whole incompetent 
outfit this is the most satisfactory news that could be had. 

SCHOOL Director Gallagher is chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Secondary Education, and he has just un- 
dertaken a scheme to increase the salary of his friend 
O'Connor, who is principal of the Mission High School, by 
an adroit move to increase the enrollment in his depart- 
ment. Education is truly secondary with Gallagher. He 
ought to be at the head of some committee on mutual 
finance. 

DE. Stahle, who was indicted by the last Grand Jury 
upon a charge of embezzling certain property of the 
City and County Hospital, of which institution he was at 
one time superintendent, has escaped trial. The thrifty 
physician's attorney had the indictment dismissed upon 
the ground that one of the twelve men who voted to indict 
Stahle was disqualified because his name was not on the 
assessment roll. This sort of vindication repeated a time 
or two would almost injure Dr. Stahle's reputation. 



THREE men were appointed by the Supervisors at their 
last meeting to take care of the New City Hall dome, 
at an aggregate wage of $210 per month. This is not a 
very large sum, but it illustrates, as well as a million 
might, the great care the Board takes of the people's 
money — and the political hangers-on. It will be a long time 
before the tower is completed, and, in any event, the work 
should be simply made a part of the regular janitor ser- 
vice of the building. The dome is a beautiful ornament, 
and its uses are being rapidly demonstrated by the patri- 
otic gentlemen whom the taxpayers have selected to feed 
and clothe the active and illiterate pull. 

THE effort to make San Francisco a city of conventions 
is suggested by kindly nature and accented by pros- 
pective financial harvests. The coming of the people from 
the East means healthful recreation to the summer visi- 
tors and prosperity to the patriotic citizens. Immigra- 
tion would follow the gathering of great national conven- 
tions, the resources of the State would be learned, and the 
most intelligent and influential people from other States 
become acquainted with California. There is not another 
city in all America where the climate is so delightful 
in the summer. While cities beyond the Rockies are burn- 
ing up with heat — where sunstrokes and tornadoes lead 
band-in-hand toward the hospital, the beer cellar, and the 
cemetery, in San Francisco the delightful ocean breezes 
make this fortunate peninsula a charming summer resort. 
The climate here is so mild and encouraging that moss grows 
the year round on the backs of a great majority of old 
residents. 



MAYOR Phelan has emphatically declared that he will 
veto the proposed monstrous tax levy that has been 
determined upon by the Supervisors; but it is pointed out 
that his veto would leave the city without funds to 
conduct any of the departments, and municipal chaos 
would result. We hope the Mayor will stand by his guns 
and throttle the schemes of extortion hatched by the 
Board. It is hardly conceivable that the Supervisors 
would make the levy now threatened if they knew that it 
would meet with a prompt veto. Mayor Phelan has every 
pocket-book in San Francisco with him. The people pre- 
fer temporary chaos to permanent robbery, any day. 

THE Board of Health has called the attention of the 
medical profession of the city to the fact that the 
law requiring prompt report of all births is being violated, 
and the Board threatens the arrest and fine of doctors who 
continue to disregard this statute. It is surprising that 
any class of citizens should prove themselves to be so un- 
patriotic. San Francisco is just now making especial 
efforts to induce immigration, is parading the fruitful soil, 
delightful climate— fruits, flowers, grain and grapes; and 
this neglect by the doctors is high treason at the very 
least. Of the coming of native sons and daughters there is 
happily no end. Hail to the ubiquitous and colicky babe; 
henceforth let no derelict doctor delay the story of his 
noisy arrival ! 

THE Merchants' Association claims a membership that 
represents more than 50 per cent, of the taxable 
property of San Francisco, and its great influence has 
been employed for the betterment of the city. Its execu- 
tive officers are composed of patriotic men of affairs, and 
the organization has been wisely kept from shooting at the 
stars. Its influence has not been frittered away in windy 
memorials to Congress; but it has been content to take up 
the annoyances that infest the day and make hideous the 
night. Street sweeping and street sprinkling, paving, 
garbage, lights and sewers have absorbed its attention. 
The Merchants' Association is one of the solid institutions 
of San Francisco, and its immense influence will be directed 
toward the suppression of that crime against society and 
enemy of economical municipal government, the thick- 
necked political boss and his shady contingent. 

AN enraged father at Los Angeles has sued out a writ 
of habeas corpus, in which the young man who ran 
away with his fifteen-year-old child, and with the criminal 
assistance of a steamboat captain married on the high seas, 
is commanded to bring her into court and defend the legal- 
ity of his reprehensible act. The News Letter will very 
widely miss its guess if the court does not hold that no 
marriage has been performed, and that the young couple 
are guilty of a great crime. The practice of thwarting 
opposing parents, common sense and the Seventh Com- 
mandment at one and the same time, by chartering any 
handy old steam scow, and going through the mockery of 
a marriage within sight of the church spires ashore, is be- 
coming too frequent in California. The complications arts- i 
ing from such irregular marriages, and equally irregular 
offspring, justify the Los Angeles father in his appeal to 
the courts. Having respect for his own name and the 
future of his child, he has wisely determined to establish 
the law in such cases made and provided. The result of 
his suit ought to be of considerable moment to several 
dozens of hitherto impatient and love-lorn couples, who 
have chosen to hazard the desperate chance of matrimony 
in this particularly desperate way. 



SAX FRAXCISCO XEWS LETTER. 



August 7, 1897. 



DEMORALIZATION OF THE SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

THE School Department of this great city is to-day 
thoroughly demoralized. Teachers and Principals are 
arraved against each other, and the scholars, for the most 
part! are in sympathy with their teachers. The latter did 
not tind their vacation a period of rest and recreation, as 
they ought to have done, but found it necessary to hasten 
their return to the city, full of perturbation and fear. 
They naturally wanted to learn what those secret, and, in 
most instances, malicious reports of the Principals meant. 
There is no longer any doubt of the fact that they were 
suggested by certain of the Directors, at the instance of 
the Bosses, in order to create vacancies for somebody to 
fill. The department is so crowded that it is hardly 
possible to appoint any more needless teachers. Patrou- 
age was desired that could not be bad without dismissals, 
and these are not lawful, except for causes real or pre- 
tended. The Principals were given a hint that "cause-* 
would be agreeable to the powers that be. and they were 
furnished, not because they existed, but because they were 
wanted. We do not know who was responsible for mak- 
ing those reports public, but it must now be confessed 
that he or she rendered a public service. If they had been 
intended in good faith and for the real improvement of the 
department, the case would have been different. But 
conceived in sin and shapen in iniquity, as they were, it 
was well that their deformity was brought to the light of 
day. It is always in order to expose a secret conspiracy 
having malign purposes in view. As a result of public ex- 
posure that conspiracy can now hardly succeed, but. 
meanwhile, irreparable injury has been done the School 
Department. Distrust, heart-burnings and bickerings 
have been created that will not soon be allayed. That 
certain of the Principals and many of the teachers can 
never get along together again as they should, is as cer- 
tain as that human nature is what it is. It is easier to 
sow distrust than to appease it. It looks as if the exist- 
ing demoralization must continue for some lime. All this 
with shame and confusion of face be it said, because the 
Bosses wanted places for their friends! Fancy the 
••friends" of Bosses Rainey and Kelly being foisted upon 
the School Department! The real "friends" of education 
can have nothing in common with such men; coarse, cor- 
rupt, vulgar and brutally ignorant as they are. Once for 
all, they should be warned that they must keep their un- 
holy hands out of the public schools. Unhappily, they 
nominated a majority of the Directors, aod what that has 
come to mean is only too well known. Bosses and Directors 
alike must be taught that there is an aroused public indig- 
nation that will tolerate no tampering with the education, 
or educators, of our future men and women. 

Whilst, however, all this is true, it must be conceded 
that the Department, as it exists today, is not what it 
ought to be, and that it is badly in need of a wise, conser- 
vative, but thorough overhauling by some competent 
authority. Its imperfections are, for the most part, those 
which Buckley, Rainey. and their kind imposed upon it, 
during long years of misrule. It was long ago proven that 
examination papers, positions in the department, and 
other things were being sold for coin, and that not a little 
of this old leaven remains, is without a doubt. That it will 
have some day to be expurgated is true. But it will not 
mend matters to have Martin Kelly and Sam Rainey dis- 
missing a hundred or more of the most experienced and 
best teachers, only to make room for friends of their own. 
That would be to intensify the evil, and not to cure it. 
Better, for the present, to endure the ills we have than 
fly to others we know not of. The needed reforms cannot 
be had to-day. but they will come ere long. The New 
Charter makers must see to it that a foundation is laid for 
a better management of the schools in the future. The 
road they will have to travel to reach that end is neither 
new nor unbeaten. The Bosses get their hold on the School 
Department, because it primarily emanates from the 
filthy pool of politics. The Bosses control the machine, 
and, as a consequence, no good can be got out of machine 
made directors. Besides, the present system makes 
politicians out of the teachers, to the injury alike of them- 
selves and the schools. A newer and better way ought not 
to be bard to formulate. It is time to enter a protest 
that will be remembered. 



The Charter-Makers The committee of one hundred are 
At Work. at work with excellent intentions, 

but with no very clear ideas of 
what they want to accomplish. Of course, they know that 
tl.ey want a new charter, but that appears about all they 
ai e \ ery sure of. It was proposed at first that they 
should agree upon the principles they desired to embody 
in the new fundamental law before proceeding to draft it. 
The proposal was a good one. but was not adopted. The 
committee would have reached a better understanding of 
itself, and of the subject matters with which it is charged, 
if it had proceeded to consider the many conflicting views 
that prevail as to how best to secure good municipal gov- 
ernment. Does it favor appointed or elected officers ? 
Has it a preference between a strong one-man power, and 
the distribution of responsibility around among many, as 
at present ? Does it believe in permanency of tenure and 
civil service reform for subordinate officials? Has it a de- 
cided mind as to how the Police and Fire Departments 
should be controlled ? Does it favor a Board of Public 
Works, and. if so. how should it be constituted ? How 
would it take the schools out of politics, and keep them 
out ? These are but a few of the problems it ought to face 
at the outset of its labors. With the adoption of a series 
of clear-cut resolutions relating to the vexed questions in- 
volved, the afterwork of drafting the charter into one 
homogeneous and consistent whole would be better left to a 
committee of experts. That, as it seems to us, would be 
the practical way for so large a body to proceed, and we 
think it cannot too soon retrace its steps. It has divided 
itself up into a number of sub-committees, to each of which is 
relegated a different branch of the municipal government. 
It is difficult to see how such an arrangement can be made 
to work. If persisted in. the proposed instrument must 
necessarily be a thing of patches and shreds, without unity 
of purpose and inconsistent with itself. Then again, it is 
proposed to submit alternative schemes to the discrimina- 
tion of the voters. That is to say. they are to exercise a 
choice between conflicting plans. If that choice can be 
limited to but three or four doubtful points, about which 
even good citizens may disagree, the idea may not be a 
bad one. But we fear it could not be so limited, and that 
the result would be the submission of practically two pro- 
posed charters. Out of so large a committee it is very 
possible that a minority may be found to form alternative 
proposals that the Bosses and tax-eaters generally would 
vote for and carry. Is it well to throw so dangerous an 
opportunity in their way ? Moreover, there does not ap- 
pear to be any provision of law by which either alternative 
proposals, or two rival charters can be submitted to, or 
voted upon, by the people. We think we see too great a 
disposition in certain quarters to pass a charter that may 
be either good or bad, if only it can be got through. That 
tendency will need watching. It will never do to compro- 
mise away evervthing that renders a new charter desira- 
ble. 

The Tax The controlling majority of the Board of 
Levy. Supervisors declare their inability to manage 
the affairs of this municipality during the com- 
ing fiscal year for less than seven millions of dollars, to 
raise which a two dollar rate will be necessary. Such a 
tax upon all the values on this peninsula would be an out- 
rage at this time, and ought to be strenuously resisted. 
The City and County Attorney has given it as his opinion 
that the Mayor has the right to veto the action of the 
Supervisors, and it is understood that Mr. Phelan is very 
willing to act upon the view of the law laid down by the 
city's legal adviser. If nine Supervisors cannot be found 
to override the Mayor's veto, the proposed rate will have 
to be very materially reduced, or no rates will be collect- 
able. Of course there are other sources of revenue beyond 
what is raised on real and personal property, but not 
enough to support the school and police departments, 
which must be kept running at all hazards. If this were 
not so, worse things might happen than that of keeping 
the vast horde of taxeaters who are fattening at the 
public crib for a year without pay. It would teach tbem 
that in the end the taxpayers are masters, and propose to 
be consulted as to the burdens they will bear. The Mayor 
says that he can show where very large reductions may 
be made in the cost of running the departments, and it is 



August 7, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



to be hoped that he will do it. If he be but firm he will de- 
feat the schemes of "the solid eight," and thereby render 
an incalculable service to every man who has anything to 
tax. The men in office, like the prospectors to the 
Klomlyke, must have a year's grubstake,' or starve. 
They will see to that, in the last resort, their friends the 
Supervisors yield. There will be a tax levy. There need 
be no fear about that. It is in the power of the Mayor to 
say how much it shall be. That he will keep the Super- 
visors pretty near to the pledge upon which he and they 
were elected, we make no doubt. Of course, the Mission 
Zoo, the repavicg of Market street, and the building of a 
new City and County hospital, desirable as they are, will 
have to await a more convenient season. This is not a 
year in which our people will stand a two dollar tax. 
The prospect of reviving times must not be blighted by 
such a burden. 

A Southern Senator Morgan, of Alabama, is nothing if not 
Fire Eater, sanguinary. He is as touchy as dynamite, 
and as full of fireworks as a Fourth of July 
orator. Had his counsels prevailed, the United States would 
have long ago been involved with England over the Venezue- 
t Ian boundary. Had his fiery denunciation of Spain been 
: listened to, we should have declared hostilities against 
i that country; and if his last suggestion had been accepted, 
' representatives of the Central American republics now in 
j this country would have been sent home, and the careful, 
painstaking work of years destroyed by the stroke of 
a pen. The Alabama Senator wanted to force our own 
Captain Merry down the throats of the hot-blooded coun- 
tries to which.he was accredited by President MeKinley, 
and upon the acceptance or rejection of the great champion 
of the Nicaraguan canal the rupture would have been 
completed or averted. 

The Senator is soon to undertake a journey of observa- 
tion, and possibly bloodshed, to the Hawaiian Islands. 
What he will do to the natives of President Dole's republic 
is not difficult to imagine. He will add war with Japan to 
his already ensanguined belt, if the slightest opportunity 
is offered. He is a pronounced annexationist, and is 
among those who imagine that the ultimate destiny of the 
United States is the conquest of the Western Hemisphere 
— and is ready to enforce his patriotic ambition at the can- 
non's mouth if need be. The Senator is anxious to imbroil 
this country in a senseless and indefensible war with our 
neighbors — destroy our commerce, squander millions of 
treasure and sacrifice thousands of human lives — all 
through a mistaken idea of the true mission of the United 
States and the comity of nations. Under some conditions 
the belligerent Morgan would be a serious menace to the 
peace and prosperity of the republic; as it is, he con- 
tributes to the gaiety of nations and the unspeakable joy 
of the gallery. 

Politics In Much misplaced sympathy is being worked 
The up in behalf of Dr. Andrews, in his retire- 

Colleges, ment from the Presidency of Brown Univer- 
sity, because of his teaching upon the silver 
question. He did not bow to the will of the country after 
the last election, but, on the contrary, has since advo- 
cated the dangerous, and, as millions of his countrymen 
believe, the dishonest policy of free and unlimited coinage 
of silver at the ratio of 16 to 1; the same to be a legal 
tender in payment of all debts, public and private. Like 
most new converts he has been extreme in his efforts to 
prosyletize. In college, and out of it, through the press 
and on the lecture platform, his zeal in behalf of a fifty 
cent dollar has outrun bis discretion. Naturally enough, 
honest-money men who believe free coinage would be a 
dire menace to the Nation, have quietly declined to sup- 
port an institution devoted to the propagation of that 
theory, and the University began to suffer. Ere long it 
would have been left without students or financial backing. 
This at last became so plain to even Dr. Andrews himself 
that he voluntarily tendered his resignation; which how- 
ever, was not accepted until after his refusal to remain on 
condition that he should discontinue his silver teachings. 
He was kindly and considerately parted with, and that 
might well have ended the episode. But now the Bryan- 
He organs all over the country are loudly proclaiming it a 
case of "persecution," and "an effort on the part of the 



mouey power to suppress free thought." False as those 
pretenses are, they may serve a purpose. They may lead 
to a beneficial discussion of the relations of our colleges to 
the political issues of the day. Free men never have 
agreed about politics or religion and never will. Political 
controversies that are warm enough and strong enough to 
divide the opinions of the Nation are better kept separate 
and apart from seats of learning. At the same lime, if 
the silver men must needs raise the issue as to their right 
to use our Universities for the propagation of their views, 
the action taken in the case of Dr. Andrews is a very 
proper answer to their challenge. 

The Tenacity The great powers of Europe decreed 
Of the Turk, some weeks ago that the Turk should get 
out of Thessaly, but he is there yet, and 
finds no difficulty in offering plausible excuses for remain- 
ing. He does not say that he will stay, but he stays all 
the same. That is his old-time policy. Generally when the 
powers agree that he must do certain things, he grumbles, 
then promises, but finally fails to keep his promise. By 
the terms of the Berlin treaty, which enabled him to es- 
cape the dismemberment of his Empire, he was at once to 
institute reforms in the government of his Christian sub- 
jects. How he first evaded, and then ignored bis engage- 
ments in that regard, all the world knows. The terrible 
massacres in Armenia tell the story only too vividly of his 
bad faith. When attempts have been made to bring him 
to task, he has shuffled, equivocated and falsified. He has 
been fertile in excuses, pleading all the time insuperable 
difficulties in the way of doing what he had been told to 
do, and had agreed to do, and has pretended to be hard at 
work removing those difficulties. Yet rapine and massa- 
cre has gone steadily on. Is he now to be permitted to find 
excuses that will suffice to enable him to remain in Thes- 
saly indefinitely? That is what he is trying to do, with 
some show of success. He is willing to go, he says, but 
wants his twenty millions of dollars first, in good gold coin. 
He is not willing to take Grecian bonds, or other prom- 
ises to pay, and, no doubt, measures the Greek by himself. 
He has not paid, and seems to have no intention of pay- 
ing Russia the indemnity for the last war, now many years 
overdue. He says he has no money or credit, and cannot 
pay. Yet he had money enough the other day to put 
300,000 soldiers in the field. What is sauce for the goose 
should be sauce for the gander. Greece cannot pay all at 
once, and should be given time. When will the powers 
tire of this everlasting shuffler, and take Gladstone's hint 
to "turn him out of Europe, bag and baggage?" He is 
out of place where he is. An Asiatic despot, he will not 
conform to the requirements of Western civilization. 

a Teapot A great cry of agony goes up from the yawn- 
Tempest, ing jingo throat of the country because it is said 
that England, pursuing the acquisitive pol- 
icy of that country (and in order to offset the annexa- 
tion of the Hawaiian Islands by the United States), has 
grabbed a little barren potato patch in the middle of the 
Pacific Ocean. The alarm is false, and the war party in 
America will have to wait for a more tangible reason be- 
fore declaring hostilities against John Bull. An English 
vessel cruising in the neighborhood of the Polynesian group 
and something like one thousand miles from Honolulu, 
touched at Palmyra Island. Hence the story of further 
strengthening of England's possessions in Pacific waters. 
Palmyra Island is one of the largest of the Polynesian 
group, and was discovered by Captain Cook, an English nav- 
igator, so long ago that everybody has forgotten the date. 
Afterwards an American guano company located on it, 
stripped it of all commercial value, and left. Later it fell 
into the hands of the Kanakas, who in turn deserted it. 
England, as is her custom, went among the islands of the 
Pacific about ten years ago sprinkling a crop of flags 
wherever vacant territory was found, and among the num- 
ber was Palmyra Island. No protest was made at 
that time or afterwards by either this country or any 
other. Thus the premature wail of the frenzied jingoes is 
again snuffed out. However, Senator Morgan of Georgia 
is to be heard from upon this deep design of England to 
dominate the waters of the Pacific. And the dizzy assort- 
ment of war-clouds carried conveniently up his sleeve may 
yet obscure the peaceful horizon. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 7, 1897. 



Excursions to Some time ago the Merchants' Associa- 
te City. tion announced that an effort would be 
made to get up and conduct a series of 
excursions to San Francisco from various points about the 
State and from more distant localities. There is no reason 
for thinking that such a series of low-rate excursions 
would not be eminently successful and would result in in- 
struction and profit to all who may be concerned. This, 
of course, is to be a movement entirely distinct from the 
plan now in its preliminary stage for making San Francisco 
the convention city of the country; but the results in each 
case could not be otherwise than gratifying. 

It may be interesting for our local association to know 
that New York has a Merchants' Association, recently 
organized, to foster commerce and prevent unjust discrim- 
ination against the city. The organization is arranging 
for a' series of fall excursions, and it is expected that the 
greatest benefits will flow from them. Speaking of the 
aim and influence of the organization, the Mail and Ex- 
press says : 

"While no dates have yet been fixed for the fall excur- 
sions to New York by the army of purchasing merchants 
located in the vast territory covered by the Joint Traffic 
and Trunk Line Associations, this appears to be now a 
matter of a few days only. The many details preliminary 
to a formal announcement are approaching completion, 
and when this announcement is made it will unquestion- 
ably represent the greatest blow struck in defense of New 
York's commercial supremacy for many a year. 

While the special railroad rates are to apply to all 
points east of the Mississippi and north of the Ohio, with 
the exception of New England, there is no reason why, in 
view of the stop-over privilege provided for the benefit of 
other trade centers, the Southeastern and Southwestern 
Railway Associations, as well as the New England body, 
should not ultimately make concessions similar to those 
already secured. Certainly, the moral force of the Mer- 
chants' Association is greatly enhanced in the view of the 
country since it has shown that it seeks nothing for New 
York which it is not willing to see granted to other cities of 
commercial importance. By thus disarming the criticism 
of the jealous and the uncharitable. New York again 
proves herself worthy of her greatness and vindicates her 
claim to be known as the Nation's greatest market." 

What is true of New York is also in relative measure 
equally true of San Francisco. The New York Associa- 
tion has seven thousand members, and the local organiza- 
tion nearly one thousand, representing more than one-half 
the assessable property in the city. Such a number of 
men can accomplish wonders when they are united and 
working in harmony toward a common end. Let us have 
the excursions and the conventions, for tbey would mean 
much to every mercantile interest and the substantial 
prosperity of the community and State. 

The Future To-day the United States are supplying 
Granary bread to many different nations. Their 

Of the World, supremacy in that regard will not long 
continue, even if our present large sur- 
plus could be maintained, which is not likely. The trans- 
Siberian railroad will open up the future granary of the 
world. An expanse of four thousand miles of wheat-grow- 
ing country, added to the producing capacity of this round 
Earth of ours, is a big thing. That appears to be the view 
taken by our Government. It is reported from Washing- 
ton that the Secretary of Agriculture has a secret com- 
mission abroad investigating the near possibilities of 
Siberia, especially as they may affect the future trade of 
the Pacific. So serious does this problem appear to'the 
administration, that the Cabinet is said to have been 
unanimous and earnest in sending this commission out. 
Whether this be true or not, it is certain that the great 
line of railroad the Russian Government is building through 
Siberia will be opened through its entire length by the 
year 1SI00. One terminal will open near the Chinese coast, 
and wheat grown in Siberia can easily be shipped, not only 
throughout China, but can be exported into Japan, to both 
of which places we now send considerable wheat and flour. 
Then from the western terminal of the road wheat can be 
rushed to France and Germany, and even to England, at 
much less cost than from the United States. The com- 
mission is also to investigate the cotton crops now being 



grown in the trans-Caspian country. The two lines of rail- 
road along the base of the Caucasus mountains have 
opened up that cotton growing country, and enquiry is to 
be instituted as to the degree of competition to be expected 
from that quarter. There can be no doubt that Russia is 
bending her best energies to get an outlet to the Pacific, 
and to control the future trade of that ocean. Good judges 
have long believed that it is not Great Britain, but Russia, 
that we shall have for a rival in the countries that con- 
front the Golden Gate. It is well to watch the develop- 
ments likely to flow from the near competition of the long- 
est railroad in the world. 

Jackson s Napa Soda kills malaria. 



GOOD! 
BETTER ! ! 
BEST ! ! 1 



There are many GOOD life assurance 
companies, there are some BETTER, 
but there is only one BEST. The 

Equitable is the best: — 

NOT BECAUSE it has, during the past thirty- 
six years, accumulated assets of over $201. 000,- 

nno— 

NOT BECAUSE it has, during the past thirty- 
six years, paid to its policy-holders $232,000,000— 

N< )T BECA USE its surplus earnings, during the 
past ten years, are more than have ever been 
earned by any other life company during any 
period of ten years — 

NOT BECAUSE its policies are incontestable 
after one year, and contain so many advantageous 
guarantees — 

NOT BECAUSE its policies have met with such 
favor that it now has over *900,0ll0,000 of assur- 
ance in force — 

BUT BECAUSE it has a surplus of 
over forty million dollars, which is 
larger than that of any other company, 
and is the strongest life company in the 
world — and, therefore, THE BEST in 
which to assure for the protection of (it 
may be) the far future of your family. 

Write or call for particulars of the Society's latest 
policy. 

A. n. SHIELD, Manager. 

EDWIN CkAHKk. Cashier. 

Crocker Building. S. F. 



August 7, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE WHEEL OF FORTUNE. 

No. VII. 

W II ILK lart;e sums were every clay won and lost at the 
faro and roulette tables, the card rooms in the jjam- 
bliuj,' houses, hotels, and clubs also did a big busiuess. It 
• secret that a regular faro lay-out was maintained, 
at which the regular gamblers were much wroth. The 
fraternity considered it an indecent thing for gentlemen 
to trespass upon thei r preserves, and especially as there 
was no admission for them to take a hand in the game. The 
spirit of play was indeed active in those days. And it 
sometimes cut up queer antics and acted in a very unusual 
and very extraordinary fashion. There was one scene 
which can never be forgotten by those who witnessed it. 
It is doubtful if it has a parallel in the history of gambling 
throughout the world. 

A millionaire, long since dead, occupied a swell house on 
Pine street, Xob Hill neighborhood, while his own was go- 
ing up. There was pleuty of life in that locality in those 
days — great entertainments, one endeavoring to outvie 
the other in magnilicence and extravagance. It was at 
that period when every one was getting rich. Stocks 
were going up, land was booming, money was easy, and 
the country was in a general and most comfortable condi- 
tion of prosperity. And so this great magnate determined 
to give a party which should leave all the previous jambo- 
rees of that famed spot in the shade. Caterers, florists, 
decorators, every one engaged in the business of making 
the house beautiful, were called in. The result was daz- 
zling, and when the guests poured in exclamations of de- 
light and admiration were heard on all sides. The music 
struck up, and the young people took partners and began 
the dance. Then did the host address himself to the grave 
and venerable signors of his party. 

"Gentlemen, you who do not care to dance come below, 
and we shall have a game of cards." 

Nothing strange in this invitation, to be sure, but the 
surprise came when they entered the card room. In one 
corner of that department stood a round table, on which 
were piled certainly not less than five thousand dollars in 
gold coius of the various denominations. 

''Help yourselves, gentlemen," s^id the host. "Some of 
you may nave come here unprepared. There is plenty for 
all. Pitch in and enjoy yourselves." 

If a bomb had fallen in the midst of that company it 
could hardly have created a greater sensation. Men ex- 
changed bewildered glances, but no one ventured to ap- 
proach the glittering pile. 

'Oh, nonsense," cried the host, "don't be so blamed 
diffident," and plunging his hands into the coin, he strewed 
it about on the different tables. Parties were made up 
and the money used. But only in the same sense as coun- 
ters, for all was restored to the pile again. Perhaps not 
all. The temptation was great, and a hundred or so 
might have gone astray. 

Simon Teackle was one of the very shrewdest gamblers 
of the old times. He dressed like a Quaker, and cultivated 
the quiet, slick manner of the sect. Simon was a big oper- 
ator on the turf, and did not appear as a professional 
sport himself, but backed Charley Burroughs in the rooms 
on the corner of Commercial and Kearny streets. The 
speculation was for a time a success, but Teackle finally 
concluded that Burroughs was too easy-going, withdrew 
his support, and Charley went to deal for John Scott. 

In 1850 Colonel Bryant, though a professed knight of the 
green cloth, ran for the office of Sheriff of San Francisco 
City and County against Colonel Jack C. Hayes, the Texan 
ranger. It was the first election for that office ever held 
in Sau Francisco, and took place on April 1st. Bryant 
was the Democratic candidate. He was a good-looking, 
stylish fellow, and set his game in a hotel called the Bryant 
House after him, situated on Clay street. Colonel Hayes 
was on the Independent ticket. The Bryant House was 
open to all during the campaign — drinks and cigars free. 
The boys clustered there by the hundreds, and it looked 
like a walk-over for Bryant. Quite unexpectedly Colonel 
Hayes, mounted on a fiery black horse, cavorting and 
plunging, dashed up Clay street. He made such a splen- 
did appearance that he was loudly cheered. After that 
ride Bryant's chances were gone, The Banger's noble 
horsemanship won the day. 




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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 7, 1897. 



ECONOMIC CONDITIONS. 

No. II. 

EDITOR Nbws Letter. Sir.— We know by experience, 
only too well, that when the economy of a country is 
vitiated by unsound legislation the discontent which en- 
sues is generally directed, justlyor unjustly, against those 
in power. The masses are ready to clamor for reform, 
but to construct the new programme is left to so-called 
leaders. These are generally men of action, fluency, and 
pronounced political views. Such men seldom have the 
time, patience or taste for the study of economic and 
sociological questions. They are generally tempted to 
seize on some specious political shibboleth, the advocacy of 
which requires no special training, and which in itself is of 
a kind to capture the fancy of the masses. Such political 
reforms appear all the more promising when the way in 
which they are to benefit the people cannot be clearly de- 
fined and the process by which they are to be attained is 
left in a nebulous and chaotic state, which affords a wide 
scope for the imagination. 

I am moved to these observations by the presence 
among us last month of Mr. W. J. Bryan, the Apostle of 
Fiatism, 1. e. Free Silver, and the utterances, reported in 
the press dispatches of July L'Tth, of Secretary John Sher- 
man, affirming the efficacy of a high protective tariff to 
create prosperity. 

Mr. Bryan, like other silverites. seems to have no con- 
ception of intrinsic equivalency in a standard of value, and 
asserts that silver will now buy as much of anything as 
ever before. I assert without fear of successful contradic- 
tion that within the period of twenty-four years, 1873 to 
1897, human labor in the gold stacdard countries would 
buy as much gold and the gold buy more of the necessaries 
of life than in any other similar period known to history. 
Furthermore an ounce of gold will not buy more labor to- 
day than it would twenty-four years ago, and an ounce of 
silver (not interchangeable as coin with gold) will not buy 
half so much labor in gold using countries as it would 
twenty-four years ago. Considering all qualifying condi- 
tions whatsoever including present depression, the conse- 
quent number of unemployed and reduction in wages, etc., 
it is reasonably certain that in the past thirty years under 
the gold standard while capital earnings have fallen 4(1 per 
cent labor earnings have increased over 50 per cent. 

As to the alleged benefit of "cheap money" to agricul- 
tural debtors of this country in regard to the payment of 
obligations: The labor bureau of the United States 
issued last year the following table of indebtedness. 

Railway Companies (5.669.431,114 

Business and homes— lots. 3,810.531, 5M 

Farms, etc 2 200,148.431 

Public debts of all kinds 2 027.170.54r, 

National banks 1,904. Ki7 351 

Other banks 1,172,918,415 

National. State and local taxes 1,010.473 013 

Crop Hens 650.000,000 

Street Railway Companies 182.240754 

Canal, turnpike and bridge companies, etc 114.268.078 

Public water companies 89.1l'7.1>:i 

Cas companies 75,000,000 

Electr e and telephone companies HV.192.565 

Telegraph companies 20.000 000 

Other debts— private 1,212.701,236 

$20,227,170,546 

It will be seen the farm incumbrances are only about 
one-ninth the total debts of the country. Here the fiat- 
ists can observe where their crusade for cheap money 
would lead to. Xor has the half been thus told. If the 
payment of twenty-two hundred million dollars of personal 
farm land mortgages in "cheap money" would be good for 
those debtors, what would be the effect of having the 
earnings of the 2"_' million wage workers, some seven 
thousand million dollars annually, paid in the same kind of 
'cheap money?" If ever the fallacy and wickedness of the 
"cheap money " craze fully dawns on the minds of the 
working men who voted for Mr. Bryan, they will be as- 
tounded at their own folly. 

The fact that this Coast has for almost fifty years been 
the unfaltering adherent of a standard of value of intrinsic 
equivalency renders the remarkable frenzy in California 
for the unlimited free coinage of silver at a ratio of 16 to 1 



all the more extraordinary. In 1894 the State Republican 
party committed itself to that form of fiatism and in 1896 
reaffirmed the folly, and the delegates to the National 
Convention at St. Louis last year went forth shouting for 
the free coinage of silver at 16 to 1, only to reverse them- 
selves on twenty-four hours notice from the National Con- 
vention. The acuteness of the craze was amazing! 
Editors, politicians, alleged statesmen, Democrats as well 
as Republicans, utterly lost their heads and filled the air 
with their wild declaimings and calamitj bowlings. It re- 
called the aphorism of Socrates, that half the trouble of 
mankind is due to the reckless use of language; and one of 
Voltaire's cynical remarks that this world of ours is the 
mad-house for the universe. The present junketing tour 
of the commissioners to promote international bimetallism 
is not likely to produce any more tangible result 
than the vaporings of the free silver enthusiasts. 
Goethe says: "The greater part of all the mischief 
in the world arises from the fact that men do not 
understani their own aims and undertake to build a 
tower and spend no more labor on the foundation than if it 
were a hut." 

During the recent Presidential campaign one of the 
favorite exemplifications of the silverites was to show how 
the "white metal'' controlled the price of farm products, 
especially wheat. While it is true that the two commodi- 
ties fluctuated at periods in about the same ratio, it was 
simply a coincidence, not an effect. Let us examine how 
they have compared during the past year: Silver was 
worth in June, 1896, per ounce, 70 cents; August, 1897, 
per ounce, 58 cents: wheat was worth in June, 1896, per 
100 pounds, 97 cents; August, 1897. per 100 pounds, $1.44, 
a change down and up in the relation between them of 
58 points, or in percentages in round figures a fall of sil- 
ver of 18 per cent., a rise of wheat of 49 per cent. Silver 
has no more to do with the price of wheat than it has with 
the price of Spring Valley water in San Francisco. The 
prices of commodities, including silver, move in obedience to 
natural and inherent causes independent of circulating 
money quantities. The economic phenomena of the past 
fifty years demonstrate this conclusively. The quantity 
theory of money is a fallacy. 

A cry of the silverites is, " Look how failures continue; 
where is your prosperity ? " It should always be borne 
in mind that after a financial and commercial crisis and 
the subsequent depression and stagnation, liquidations 
continue long after current business has appreciably im- 
proved. This is inevitable. 

Certainly no Democrat, and probably no Republican not 
blinded by partisan bigotry or prejudice, believed that the 
election of Mr. McKinley to the Presidency could bring 
prosperity to the country. What gold standard Demo- 
crats (of whom I am one) did believe has been well ex- 
pressed by Editor Richardson of the Eldorado (Cal.) Re- 
publican as follows: 

" The writer voted for William McKinley, not because of a belief 
that a protective tariff insures a country against hard times, or even 
tends to permanently remove that condition, but because the entire 
policy of the Republican party on the tariff and finance was likely 
to give a temporary social stability that would enable work and busi- 
ness to be resumed as fast as conditions of supply and demand would 
permit. Prosperity, as people call it, is not poured out of a bottle 
into this nation by any political doctor— McKinley or otherwise"— 
not even bv Mr. Sherman. 

The real prosperity of a country comes only from the in- 
dustry, frugality, and patience of it* people, under a Gov- 
ernment intelligently, honestly, and economically adminis- 
tered, and that this country has enjoyed prosperity is in 
despite of a Government extravagantly administered in 
the main for thirty-five years past. 

Let no one assume that I disparage the importance of 
intelligent and therefore just legislation in promoting the 
welfare of a country. Right here, though, comes one of 
our greatest evils. Our legislation has been not only crude 
and empirical, but peculiarly selfish — the substitution of 
domestic for political economy. The chief economic diffi- 
culty is excess of production, accompanied by a still greater 
excess of capacity for production, with every opportunity 
for distribution abroad hampered and hindered by the in- 
terposition of paternalism — fatuous legislation at home. 
But legislation is in the hands of the people, and when it 
is inadequate, unjust, or pernicious, they have simply to 



August 7, 1897. 



SAX I'RAXCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



try a chaDge. Conscience, patience, and industry, with 
tbe ballot intelligently exercised, are adequate to produce 
improved conditions. The inherent strength and vigor of 
the nation triumphs over all obstacles. Our country is 
emerging from the depression of 1833-91! simply because its 
vitality is strong enough to overcome the quack nostrums 
so frequently administered during this generation. And 
those who have such unbounded faith in the efficacy of 
crude statutory law would do well to ponder Goldsmith's 
lines : 

" In every Government, though terrors reign, 
Though tyrant kings or tyrant laws restrain, 
How small, of all that human hearts endure, 
That part which laws or kings can cause or cure.'* 

I have, during the past six months, made inquiry re- 
garding tbe business prospects throughout the Western 
States, and advices from Montana, Washington, Oregon, 
Cab'fornia. Colorado, Nebraska, Kansas, and Texas, con- 
cur in the assertion that there is increased activity in all 
these States, with evidences of the cumulative good effect 
of the past four years of economy and frugality in living. 

Wells, Fargo & Company, whom I serve, is probably as 
well situated as any business organization to take early 
cognizance of the movements of commerce, having agen- 
cies abroad as well as throughout the American continent, 
practically from Guatemala to the Canadian boundary, and 
from ocean to ocean, having over 30,000 miles of inland 
lines and established offices in no less than six of the seven 
census districts of the United States, with a total of agen- 
cies numbering over 3200. As indicated by the transac- 
tions of this company, the facts are that the extreme 
depth of depression was reached in 1894, the upward 
movement manifested in 1895, and continued through the 
first six months of 1896. At that period it was arrested 
by the excitement of a heated Presidential campaign, but 
the general outcome of 1896 was still an advance over 
1895; and basing an estimate on returns received to Aug- 
ust 1st of this year, the advance for 1897 over 1896 will be 
even greater. Therefore, we may fairly say that there 
has been improvement in current business throughout the 
last three years to date. John J. Valentine. 

San Francisco, August S, 1897. 

{To be continued.) 

THE LURLINE BATHS. 



IT is a far cry from Ancient Rome to modern San Fran- 
cisco; but in reading of the luxurious baths of the 
Eternal City the mind involuntarily turns to similar in- 
stitutions of to-day, and one of them is the famous Lurline 
Baths of San Francisco, where salt water from the ocean 
is brought into the heart of the city and warmed to a com- 
fortable temperature for bathing and swimming the year 
round. Here men, women and children mingle in enjoy- 
ment of the delights of sea bathing, surrounded by all the 
accompaniments of convenience and luxury which the Ro- 
mans enjoyed. Not the rich alone, but the poor also have 
been provided for, as the prices are within the means of 
the most humble, while those with money to spend for lux- 
uries can secure all they desire. 

The great tiled and enameled swimming tank has an 
area of 11,250 square feet, the water varying from 4» to 9 
feet in depth. The baths have toboggan slides, rings, 
trapezes and high dives for the swimmers; instructors to 
aid and teach the timid; hot and cold tub and shower, 
Russian steam and needle baths, masseurs, chiropodists, 
hairdressers, gymnasium, cafe, barber shop, bicycle de- 
partment and a separate department for ladies. 

The French are the greatest cooks in the world. To receive a 
pleasing illustration of this one has only to visit the Maison Kiche, 
Geary and Grant avenue, between the hours of 5 and 9 o'clock, and 
enjoy a French dinner served daily. Beautiful string orchestra, 
choicest wines, and refined service. 



A drink of J. F. Cutter Whiskey is always in order, because it is 
the finest liquor made and is the recognized standard of excellence 
by all good judges throughout. It's like gold— there's no discount 
on it. E. Martin & Co., 411 Market street, are sole Pacific Coast 
agents for J. F. Cutter Whiskey. 

Shirt Waist Buttons, Silver Links, and other novelties in sterlin 
silver at J. N. Brittain's, watchmaker and Jeweler, 20 Geary street. 

Jackson's Napa Soda is a gentle aperient. 




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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 7, 1897. 




' We obey no wand but pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



IN London to-day are playing two plays 
— Tin Princess and thi Butterfly, by Mr. 
Pinero. and Tin Physician, by 11 r. Jones — 
which have discovered to English literary 
persons a new malady and its cure. The 
malady of middle age, it is called, and the 
cure is love. "Middle age," like appendicitis, is said to 
be quite prevalent uow that it is discovered — even the 
youug are afflicted, and the medicine is not always bitter. 
I remember reading in the Daily Telegraph of London, 
some 3'ears ago, interminable papers on "the age of love." 
For the most part these papers bore fictitious signatures, 
but an aroma of British sincerity pervaded them all. In 
one, I remember, it was upheld that a woman of fifty-five 
was a sun-burst of man-comfort, providing the man to be 
comforted (he was to be sixty, I believe) was proportion- 
ately lively at heart — if not, a younger man would do. I 
soon made up my mind that the writer of this was a 
woman, and fifty-five. In another paper it was argued 
that a young man of twenty-five, an exceptional young 
man of twenty-five, who had precociously acquired sedate- 
ness and stability, could marry charms of forty-two 
and not Hy in the faces of fate and nature. By a similar 
deduction I convinced myself that this was written by a 
solid old party of twenty-five, who had fallen heels-over- 
head to some superb specimen of belated maidenhood. 
And when I read descriptions of the new plays of Mr. 
Pinero and Mr. Jones, it seemed as if some of those old 
letters in the Telegraph had been sublimated and societized 
into very interesting studies on the disease of being forty 
or thereabouts and its cure — the cure consisting, as I have 
already said, in finding the latent love in the heart of forty, 
and finding another to mate it in the heart of — Well, Mr. 
Pinero finds the other for his hero in a "meteoric girl of 
eighteen," for his heroine (she is forty or thereabouts, too) 
in "a fiery youth of twenty-eight;" and Mr. Jones presents 
an equally liberal discrepancy of years. 

Now, in Rosemary, which Mr. John Drew and his com- 
pany are playing at the Baldwin Theatre, and which by 
its poesy graces has ensnared many cant critics into call- 
ing it the antithesis of the problem drama, there is a victim 
of ■middle age" who is just forty, and who falls in love 
with an excessively young girl of eighteen. She, like Mr. 
Jones's heroine in Tin Physician, is betrothed to another of 
little more than the same tender years; but honor con- 
quers in Rosemary, the young loves fly their way, and the 
middle-aged hero is left alone — but cured. His love and 
its grief remain. And to point the permanency of the 
cure a sub-act is dared, wherein we see Sir Jasper Thorn- 
dyke in his ninetieth year — a doddering old man with mem- 
ory all but dead, living only by instinct, and by instinct 
coming back again, for the last time, to the old place 
where he had parted from her; by accident he finds the 
page torn from her diary, by instinct he reads it, and 
vaguely remembers and vaguely ruminates. It is a phan- 
tom gesture of the romance that was; it is almost as im- 
personal as a faded daily prayer. It is the symbol of his 
salvation, that is all. One is sure that an active heart 
had saved him from the miasmata of middle age. 

In London and in New York Rosemary did not figure in 
the "age of love' controversies — the subject had not 
then become legitimate dramatic babble; the little play 
was unique among costume plays for its delicacy and for 
its simple dramatic strength. " The last act, of course, is 
the ground for disagreement; it displays to the auditor 
what is usually left to his imagination; and dramatic con- 
struction, which is based exclusively on what will sustain 
the auditors' interest, is very clearly defined and is not 
assisted by this innovation. The last act of Rosemary is 
essentially undramatic from the standpoint of construc- 
tion; if accepted it would establish a gloomy precedent. 
Who, sav, would be the better entertained for seeing 
Dorothj Cruickshank appear in the last act with wizened 
face, barren gums, aud all the physical disqualifications of 



seventy summers ? Thackeray did something like that to 
his Beatrice Esmond and the world has not quite forgiven 
bim yet, withal the old witch's cleverness. The scheme 
of it is unpoetic. and Rosemary is poetic beyond a cavil in 
its first three acts — quaint, early-Victorian poetry, with 
a pretty vein of truth singing in it. But to see that last 
act once — only once, mind, for it is very disenchanting 
when it ceases to be a surprise ! — is not to be absolutely 
offended ; it blends sympathy and cynicism into a touch- 
ing, humorous mixture. And for him, of course, who re- 
gards a play as accomplished with the instant of its last 
curtain, this act holds that curtain back long enough to 
supply him with imagination. But if, as Mr. Peter Rob- 
ertson suggested to me the other night, it is there to 
to exhibit the actor in some of the clever tricks of his 
trade, then there is nothing to redeem it and it ought to be 
stamped on on principle. We have too much actor in the 
drama anyway. I am reminded of a day when an editor 
asked me to " tack on " six lines to a notice of a play so as 
to dress up the column. If it had been a sonnet I sup- 
pose he would have said the same thing. 

Otherwise Rosemary is delicious. The opeuing act is 
leisurely, but not dull; it gives immediate individuality to 
all the characters who are seen, and cleverly anticipates 
that czar whose very humbleness is a tyranny, Professor 
Jogram. The second act is masterly — that is a high word, 
I know, but the second act is masterly just the same. The 
situations are there, and one feels that the dialogue is the 
natural outcome of these situations, and the characters 
fulfill their promise with fine integrity. I know of no 
scene in comedy — outside of the acknowledged master- 
pieces — that comes to a more unaffectedly effective close 
than this brilliant second act. It makes conversation dull 
between curtains. The third is full of impetus and tender- 
ness. The page from Dorothy's diary, the struggle for 
honor, the giving of her up — sure, the old, sad song is 
sung with depth and artistic decency in this dear little 
play! 

It is unfortunate that Mr. Drew plays his share of the 
third act for nothing like what it is worth. In the earlier 
scenes he is sensitive to every shade of his part; his opti- 
mism—the sheer jollity of the man who is unconsciously 
falling in love, and, as it were, spilling it all over the sun- 
shiny earth — is magnetically glad: it gives me a sensation 
of warm, human delight. But the ' strong scenes" find 
him melodramatic and hollow. I should rather believe this 
due to false conception than absolute inability, for I re- 
member John Drew in The Baubh Stop, where he played 
with subtlety, strength, and conviction. This is not Mr. 
Drew's advent into seriousness, and I cannot imagine why 
he should insist on such strenuousness, when tense repres- 
sion would serve him and his authors ten-fold better. As 
it is he attains to little beside the motions of the wildest 
costume acting, and caricatures the catastrophe of the 
piece. In the last act he gives a good study in mumbling 
and make-up, unimprovable I dare say — but that sort of 
thing is only one of the fancy shots of play-acting. John 
Drew's genius glitters in the first two acts of Rosemary. 

It is a splendid play for acting; I don't think even the 
actors can grumble at their parts, which are consistent 
and definite, and not needlessly stagey. Even the two old 
men, the sea dog and the Professor, with their Dickens- 
esque catch lines, are nowise banal. Professor Jogram. in 
fact, is a valuable addition to the drama; hesubstitut ?s the 
stage mother-in-law with copious improvement, and really 
he becomes something more than comic relief as the play 
progresses. Mr. Harkius is clever enough to raise him 
from eccentricity to earnestness without losing the color 
of the part. Mr. Harwood does well, but there is small 
chance for distinction in the old sailor. Mr. Arthur Byron 
is the best actor of cub roles that I have ever seen upon 
any stage. If it is all simulation I cannot compliment him 
higher on playing William, the sulky turtle dove. But, 
after all, couldn't Sir Jasper shine just as fascinatingly if 
William were a little less kickable? 

I have heard that Dorothy was the bigger half of Rost 
iiuinj when Miss Maud Adams played in the New York 
production, and it is easy to believe, considering that Miss 
Isabelle Irving, an actress of largely less spell, makes 
Dorothy an even half now. Undoubtedly this is the best 
work of Miss Irving's young life, and it would be mere 
idiocy to attribute its excellence to imitation. She could 



August 7, 1897. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW3 LETTER. 



no more imitate Miss Adams's art than her nose. She 

grasps the gush of Dorothy, the sweet silliness, the pretty, 

raw youth ami makes tliani real withherown personal spirit. 

Her reading of the diary is a faultlessly balanced bit of 

comedy craft. I apologize for ever having said that Miss 

Irving could not act. 

• » » 

7Vi. Oast of Rehtttiout Susan is one of Mr. Jones's most 
insinuating sallies. Ostensibly conceived in the comic 
spirit, irradiated by comic incident, familiarized a little by 
common play writing conventions, it is a still deft diatribe on 
the futility of forgiveness and married life as it is usually 
practiced. Especially forgiveness when the husband 
does not even know what he is forgiving. There are three 
couples in the play, the Susans, the Pybuses and the 
Darbys: the two last are avowedly funny, the other is of 
the world woildly; all are utterly hopeless in the scheme of 
domestic happiness. The only hope seems to be for Sir 
Richard and Mrs. Quesnel, who are skeptics and victims 
of "middle age." They have exhausted everything in life ex- 
cept its virtues. Susan is beyond recall; her last line is 
her keynote — "I want to be loved." After she has per- 
mitted herself to be forgiven one is sure that it is only a 
question of weeks before Mr. Susan falls into a new indis- 
cretion, and she does the whole thing over again. All in 
all a pessimistic comedy of rare diversion which 
I had the pleasure of reviewing to considerable 
length on this page two seasons ago when the Lyceum 
company played it here. It was the best acted piece of 
one of the best Lyceum seasons, cast with picked playeis, 
so it cannot be said that the Frawley people give the same 
satin performance. It is by far the most satisfyingly ele- 
gant of Mr. Jones's plays — Mr. Jones is too much the 
preacher to be elegant always — and it demands the 
social atmosphere that comes of good stage manage- 
ment. To say that it is not played up to the old 
Lyceum mark is no disparagement: of the new 
pieces put on by Mr. Frawley this season, Rebelliovs Susan 
is the smoothest played. Some of the acting is capital. 
Miss Bates's Susan, with a touch of cold brutality to it, is 
much more real than Miss Irving's; and Mr. Worthing's 
Sir Richard, if not encased in that easy importance which 
Mr. Kelcey lent the part (it was the best thing 
Kelcey ever did); nevertheless is accomplished acting of 
the more affable sort. Mrs. Quesnel is the most human 
drawing room personation Miss Moretti has executed dur- 
ing the engagement. Mr. Clarke's Pybus is another im- 
provement on Mr. Clarke. The other players, with the 
exception of Mr. Hamilton, do not seem judiciously cast. 

Ashton Stevens. 

The Frenchy farce now known as Betsy, and a Francis 
Carlyle mono-act are passing the week pleasantly at the 
Alcazar. Monday night comes the Powers, play, Greek 
Meets Turk, and it is safe to say that none of the critics 
nor many theatre patrons will pass over Mr. Powers this 
time. The play needs no further description until it is re- 
viewed. It is on the late Grieco-Turkish unpleasantness, 
and the title and Mr. Powers's First Born imply realism 
and vivid action. The cast is picked from the members 
new and old of the Alcazar stock company, and new people 
specially engaged. There are thirty-one speaking parts 
in the play, besides a chorus of twenty-five voices. Much 
is expected of the incidental music. 

Edwin Stevens and Wan g close gorgeously at the Tivoli to- 
morrow night. Monday begins the long-expected opera 
season, with Madame Kronold-Koert in the title-role of 
Verdi's masterpiece, Aida. Mrs. Hinrichs will be the 
Amneris, William Mertens the Amonasro, Michelena the 
Radames, and Abramoff the Ramphis. It is promised that 
this will exceed even last season's famous production. On 
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday Romeo and Juliet wil be 
given, with Mile. Alexis Bassieu as the heroine and Miche- 
lena the Romeo; the other nights are for Aida. Mr. 
Hinrichs leads, and Mr. Lask directs the stage. 

In the cat and dog actors, the strong woman and Pa- 
pinta, the Orpheum offers an exceptional bill, even for the 
Orpheum. It will be further strengthened next week by 
Gus Williams, the greatest of German dialecticians, and 
Hilda Thomas, a vaudeville comedienue of reputation, as- 
sisted by Frank Barry, accompanist and vocalist. 



At the Columbia the Frawleys will repeat an old favor- 
ite, Tin Charity Hull. Mr. Parry, the clever valet of A 
Social Highwayman, is cast for the wayward brother. 

Another week of Rosemary at the Baldwin. 

To be up to date in alt your furnishing goods is to buy tli em at 
Carmany'e, 25 Kearny street. 



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Market street, San Francisco. 



When playing poker drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 

G-.I.,~U!~ TL„i The "Gem" Theatre ot the Coast. 
oiumDia 1 neatre- Frtecuander, Gotuob&co., - 



and Managers 



, Lessees 



Monday, Aug. 9th. Eleventh week of the Season. THE FRAW- 
LEY COMPANY, in Belasco & De Mine's best play, 

THE CHARITY BALL. 

Monday, August 16th— The Idler. 

B-%1 J../!_ TL«-J--« AL Hayman & Co., (Incorporated 
al<J\rVin I heatre- Proprietors 

Commencing next Monday, August 9th. Second and last week 
of MR. JOHN DREW (management of Charles Frohman) pre- 
senting his greatest triumph, 

ROSEMARY. 

"That's for Remembrance." By Louis N. Parker and Murray 

Carson. 

Monday, August 16th— The Heart of Maryland. 

T 1 , I ■ r\ I— i Mrs. Ernestine Kreling, .. 

I VOI I Upera riOUSe. Proprietor and Manager 

Commencing Monday, August 9th The 

GRAND OPERA SEASON. 

Under the direction of Mr. Gustav Hinrichs. 1st week's reper- 
toire: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Sunday evening, Verdi's 
masterpiece, AIDA. Mmes. Kronold-Koert. Fleming- Hinrichs, 
etc.; Michelena, Mertens, Abramoff, West,. Thomas, etc. 
Tuesday, Thursday. Saturday eveniDgs, Gounod's tragic opera, 
ROMEO AND JULIET. M'lles, Alexia Bassian, Bernice 
Holmes, etc.; Michelena, Raffael, Abramoff, Darcey, West, 
Boyes, etc. 

Careful productions; splendid chorus; enlarged orchestra. 
Popular Prices . - 25c and 50c 

Ol San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. O'Farijell 

r P llG U m . street, between Stockton and Powell streets . 

"Week beginning Monday evening, August 9th. The world's great- 
est German comedian, 

GUS WILLIAMS. 

Hilda Thomas, the clever comedian, assisted by Frank Barry, 
pianist; tremendous success of Professor Leonidas and his 
cats and dogs; Mary Arniotis, the strongest woman in the 
world; Papinta, ihe myriad dancer; the three Rackett Brothers. 
Crawford & Manning, Elvira JfrencellL & Tom Lewis, and the 
Deonzos. - .. 

Reserved seats, 35c ; balcony 10c ; opera chairs and box seats 50c. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. Matinee Prices : 
Parquet, any seat, 35c; balcony, any seat, 10c; children, 10c, 
any part . 

r\ 1 T* L J_ Belasco & La Faille, Lessees and Man- 

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Monday night, August 9th. First production of Mr. Francis ' 
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TURK MEETS GREEK, 

A perfect historical presentation. 

Matinee Saturday afternoon. Popular prices: A choice re- 
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IS YOUR 

TITLE 

PERFECT? 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 7, 1897. 



" Tfle Cyclopir iia of Practical Quotations." by J. K. Hoyt. Pub- 
lished by Frank Wagnalls Company, Chicago. 

A prospectus of the above publication bas reached us. 
Litt'.e did the sender know how we regard these short cuts 
to knowledge. Of all tbe manifold schemes for producing 
an appearance of culture, we consider the thesaurus of 
quotations as the most reprehensible, for it is positively 
fraudulent in intent, being obviously designed to enable its 
users, by adroitly culling appropriate sentiments from its 
pages, to gain the credit with ignorant listeners of having 
read books written in Greek. Latin, French, and other 
languages entirely unknown to the quoters. It scarcely 
pretends to lead to knowledge, but only to a reputation 
for knowledge. It is presumed that the wildest enthu- 
siast in favor of its practical usefulness to uncultured peo- 
ple anxious to appear cultured would not venture to assert 
that readers of the cyclopa-dia of quotations are led on by 
a perusal of its promiscuous contents to read the works 
from which this literary kaleidoscope is constructed. A 
man may spend a lifetime in collecting fragments of col- 
ored glass without gaining the capacity to appreciate the 
painted windows of a Gothic cathedral. We have looked 
over the translations of several of the quotations from 
Latin authors, and very queer translations some of them 
are. It is enough to give one example. Ante victoriam 
ne canai triumphant, which means, "Don't sing a song of 
triumph before you have won a victory": the translation 
given of this is, " Count not your chickens before they are 
hatched." Fancy the credulous senator, congressman, or 
parson who blindly accepted this translation: he would 
suppose that omas meant "count." triumphum "chicken." 
and victoriam "hatching." In defense of this barbarous 
book tbe publishers impudently quote Isaac D'Israeli and 
Emerson, thereby manifesting themselves faithful follow- 
ers of the devil, who can quote the Scriptures most adroitly 
to suit his own wicked purposes. The former of these two 
eminent writers said: "It is generally supposed that 
where there is no quotation there will be found most origi- 
nality. The great part of our writers have, in consequence, 
become so original that no one cares to imitate them: and 
those who never quote in return are seldom quoted." 
Emerson says: "A great man quotes bravely, and will not 
draw on his invention when his memory serves him with a 
word as good." But both Emerson and D'Israeli intended 
that men should quote from their memory passages which 
they have actually read, and which have become part of 
the furniture of their minds. Great men "quote bravely" 
from the fullness of their minds: by the aid of compilations 
such as this cyclopaedia little men are enabled to quote 
impudently from authors they never heard of, and to draw 
from the pages of a dictionary not only things which their 
memory fails to recall, but words which they never read 
and never were capable of reading. The compilers of this 
cyclopaedia admit that "to quote conspicuously and well 
requires taste, judgment, and erudition, a feeling for the 
beautiful, an appreciation of the noble, and a sense of the 
profound." Yet people utterly devoid of taste, judgment, 
erudition, a feeling for the beautiful, an appreciation of 
the noble, or a sense of the profound, are encouraged to 
hope that by an investment of six dollars they can pass 
themselves off to the world as the happy possessors of all 
these grand things. For how many minutes do you sup- 
pose that any one of the poor fools investing their money 
in this volume would deceive a man really familiar with the. 
authors quoted ? 

A prospectus of The Lotus, which modestly announces 
itself as "the one characteristic American periodical of 
literature in America to-day," has fallen into our hands. 
If this claim is a just one, the other periodicals are either 
not "American," or are not "of literature." The pros- 
pectus says that The Lotus "enrolls all the young men 
and women writers and readers who believe in American 
Authorship and Literature" spelled with capital letters. 
Those who do not write for or read The Lotus are stamped 
as unbelievers in the gospel of "American Authorship and 
Literature."— If American Literature is something 



nli generis, and not part and parcel of the great body of 
English literature, we hear and now proclaim ourselves in- 
fidels. Of the stories that a/e printed in the pages of 
The Lotus it is said that "they are not made on a carpen- 
ter's bench, like those of the old-fashioned domestic 
magazines." Possibly not: but they may be written with 
a journeyman's pen for all that. We are, however, told 
that "they are written by virile young writers to please 
themselves." Then, if the "virile young writers" are 
pleased with them, the stories have fulfilled their purpose: 
and the "virile young writers" must not be surprised or 
hurt if their work does not please the public or the critics. 
The Lotus further asserts that "all its literature is 
written by American writers for American readers." 
Now, we do not care a particle about the nationality or 
citizenship of any writer who can win our interest or 
touch our hearts. Is an Irishman, a Canadian, or an 
American to be such a fool as to refuse to read Robert 
Louis Stevenson or Andrew Lang because they are Scotch- 
men, or is an Englishman to taboo Hawthorne or Emerson 
because they are Americans? If people of American 
birth write literature at all, they must perforce write 
English literature. Who shall say that Longfellow, Lowell, 
Holmes, Irving, Preseott or Motley, wrote American, but 
not English, literature? Of all books published in America 
by American writers it may be said that either they are 
not literature, or they are not American: in so far as they 
are specially or peculiarly American, they are not litera- 
ture. Is any one ready to assert that Walter Scott wrote 
Scotch literature, but did not write English literature? 
We trow not. This theory, if logically carried out, would 
compel us to say that there is a Californian literature, a 
Floridan literature, an Iowan literature, and heaven 
knows how many other literatures, and that the pit of 
Hamlin Garland's provincialism is gaping wide for all 
America writers. God forbid. 

In the last issue of Collier's Weekly that we have seen 
Mr. Edgar Fawcett asks whether it is possible that a very 
great fortune, even when its possessor is coarse in man- 
ners and speech, can purchase the company of people of 
the highest birth in England. Let us try to answer his 
question. In an old, settled and highly cultivated com- 
munity the vast majority of people accepted in good 
society are well educated and well mannered; indeed, there 
is almost a dead level of good manners. Such a society, 
with every resource at its command, sometimes grows a 
little tired of its own perfections, and longs for diversion, 
in the shape of something uutre or vulgar. Hence the 
social success of such people as Joaquin Miller, Buffalo 
Bill, the Shah of Persia, a Kaffir or a Zulu Chief. The 
coarse manners and positive vulgarity of such people set 
off by contrast the agreeableness of the manners of well- 
bred people: they lend a certain "zip" to social intercourse. 
And, besides, it must be remembered that the people you 
meet in a house are really of more importance to you than 
your host and hostess; if you meet agreeable people, you 
need not trouble much about the host; he is merely the 
man who pays the bills, and the hostess is the lady you 
shake hands with on arriving and departing. And you 
can escape from your host so soon as he begins to bore you. 
Thus in an old society there is always room for a few (not 
too many) very rich men, who will spend their money in 
lavish entertainments; they furnish the spice of variety, 
and add to the picturesqueness of things. Further, a 
society composed of persons quite sure of themselves can 
afford to receive quite unconventional persons, just as the 
Duke of Wellington can afford to d ress anyhow and talk to 
anybody. The people who assume to be at the top of the 
tree in a new society, not being quite sure of their ground, 
and claiming a superiority which their fellow-citizeus do 
not concede to them, are troubled by qualms to which the 
breasts of persons of unquestioned position are utter 
strangers. The social importance of Lord Salisbury or 
the Earl of Warwick is not a whit imperilled by their be- 
ing seen as guests at the house of a manufacturer of boot- 
blacking or washing-powder; and, if the blacking-man 
amuses or interests them, why should they deny them- 
selves the pleasure of going to bis house, and lending an 
air of distinction to his wife's parties? But Mr. Fawcett 
has himself almost anticipated this explanation, which is, 
of course, the true and only one, of the matter. 



August 7, 1897.